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Author Topic: 40 meter noise level  (Read 844 times)
AI4U
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Posts: 65




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« on: January 03, 2006, 06:07:57 PM »

Hi,
  I was wondering what others are hearing as far as 40 meter noise levels. I am getting spikes of up to s8 - 9 . Is this normal for 40 meters lately, or I am getting interference from something?
Jeff
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WI7B
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Posts: 53


WWW

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« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2006, 07:07:39 PM »


Jeff,

Last night was horrendous.  Tonight was so-so.  Good xhexk is to listen to the award nets on 40m.  Like OMISS on 7.2635 @ 01:00 UTC, or the 3905 Club.

73,

---* Ken
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20560




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« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2006, 07:10:06 PM »

S-meter readings don't mean much, since they're all different.

Tonight (1/3/06 local time, 1/4/06 in UTC) I didn't notice any unusual noise level on 40m.  I use several reference standards, one of which is the time standard station CHU in Ottawa, Ontario on 7.335, since it's there 24/7 and has been there my whole life.

I just checked it, and it's 20 dB/S9 here in Los Angeles; I have a background noise level (between BC stations!) of about S2.

WB2WIK/6
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K6AER
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Posts: 3497




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« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2006, 08:00:14 PM »

I'll make a guess that you were hearing two of the largest winter thunder storm fronts seen in years. Front one was from the Great Lakes down through Ohio. The second front was located in the South East down to Mississippi. The lightning activity was strong enough to be heard on twenty meters from Colorado.

Try this site to check lightning activity in the lower 48 states.

https://thunderstorm.vaisala.com/

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K4SAV
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Posts: 1834




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« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2006, 08:32:31 PM »

Noise on 40 meters varies a lot depending on your local noise level and the current atmospheric conditions. If you live in an urban environment you may have a lot of man made noise. This is usually easily distinguishable from atmospheric noise.  Storm conditions greatly affect the amount of noise you hear. You can hear storms in any location if there is propagation to that location, but the biggest effect is from storms that happen to be close to you. I live in a quiet rural area. Last night with the beam pointed at Europe the noise level was below S1 on 40M.  Tonight, pointed at Europe there are a lot of crashes going up to S9.  That is because the beam is pointed directly into a storm over New England. You will also notice, in general, there is more noise during the summer than in the winter.  That is because there are more storms in the US during the summer than in the winter.

The next time you have a lot of noise, go to one of the weather sites and look at a radar map of the US. Also check out this link that shows lightning distribution throughout the world, during whatever time you select.
http://thunder.nsstc.nasa.gov/data/OTDsummaries/

Jerry, K4SAV
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W9GB
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Posts: 2612




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« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2006, 09:48:55 PM »

AER is correct ... not fun on 40 meters last week in Chicago area.  
Got about 2 good days of listening and operating in.

SKN was not the best conditons fior this new year's.

w9gb
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K0ZN
Member

Posts: 1542




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« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2006, 10:30:46 PM »

The bands have been noisy ....atmospheric in most cases.  You can look at one of the many internet weather sites...if you see if a large part of the country is under a large high pressure system and there are no major frontal system storms, typically the low bands are more quiet under this condition...and visa versa.

We have had some unusually warm weather this winter which is allowing unseasonal thunderstorms; the weather has been more like March than January.

A simple check of atmospheric noise is that 160, 80 and 40 typically all have a higher noise level when QRN levels are high.

73,  K0ZN
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AI4U
Member

Posts: 65




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« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2006, 05:38:48 AM »

Thanks for all the info ! Seems like most others are hearing as much noise that I am. I had suspected it might be atmospheric conditions, but wasnt entirely sure. All I know is that last night 40 meters was exremely loud and crashy. Thanks
Jeff
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