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Author Topic: Armstrong Rotor  (Read 1643 times)
KC2PHJ
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Posts: 21




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« on: March 08, 2008, 02:48:00 PM »

I've heard about this rotor and I'm thinking to use it for a project at my QTH. It will be for a small antenna.
Are these able to be brought or do you have to make it?
Any information?

Thanx,

KC2PHJ
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KZ1X
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Posts: 3227




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« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2008, 02:53:08 PM »

I am not sure if you're "pulling our legs."
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20543




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« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2008, 03:16:53 PM »

The Armstrong rotator is a unique design that no mortal has been able to fully reproduce.

It involves millions of years of evolution.  It's weatherproof and has an average lifespan of over seventy years -- much longer than the average rotator!

If you can find a way to mass produce these, we'd all be interested.

WB2WIK/6
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N3KTA
Member

Posts: 13




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« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2008, 03:18:47 PM »

1. Mount a directional antenna on a mast that is located just outside of an accessible window
2. When desiring a change of direction, open window and reach outside.  Grasp mast with both hands and turn in the desired direction using the Armstrong method.

WARNING: Do not do this near power lines or if the mast is cemented into the ground.
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N1LO
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Posts: 1039


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« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2008, 03:24:13 PM »

The Armstrong rotor is remarkably flexible. It's the ultimate emergency power rotor. It can run off all kinds of different fuel such as steak, potatoes, broccoli, beer, ice cream, vodka and Snickers bars, just to name a few!

--...MARK_N1LO...--
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N3KTA
Member

Posts: 13




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« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2008, 03:29:21 PM »

I do not recommend fueling the Armstrong rotor with beer, vodka, or any alcohol-based fluid.  I tried this once while operating portable and the Armstrong rotor failed miserably thus causing the Yagi to become embedded in mountaintop soil.
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W3LK
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Posts: 5644




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« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2008, 03:40:41 PM »

<< If you can find a way to mass produce these, we'd all be interested. >>

With rare exceptions, these can only be made one-at-a-time. It generally (but not always) requires two technicians working together to produce one working model.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
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A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
KA5N
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Posts: 4380




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« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2008, 04:40:58 PM »

Don't let them kid you. Armstrong rotors come from the same place as shank's mare and elbow grease.
Allen
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N3KTA
Member

Posts: 13




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« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2008, 05:05:20 PM »

All kidding aside...there are various ways to construct an antenna mounting structure so that the Armstrong method can be employed.  I've seen masts with welded handles, vice grips, pulleys...you name it.  Google 'K4LRG Harper's Ferry balloon' 2004A and you will see a pic of an interesting setup that he has.  Actually, with a little ham ingenuity, you can come up with some interesting mounting schemes (and have fun doing it).  Just watch out for power lines, windows, and small children.  
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KB1IAI
Member

Posts: 69




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« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2008, 06:45:46 PM »

you guys have all forgotten my favaorite:
Rube Goldberg, inventer of all things odd!!
hahahahahahahahaha
73 paul kb1iai
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W1ITT
Member

Posts: 145




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« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2008, 06:50:26 PM »

A few years ago, while working in Romania. one of the locals on site invited me to see his hamshack.  He had a couple nifty homebrew all-band ssb transceivers feeding a 20 meter quagi on the roof.  The array was turned by a wonderful Armstrong rotor that came straight through the roof into the radio room and featured a big compass rose, a large turning peg and mechanical stops.  It reminded me of a submarine periscope.  What those guys lack in ready cash, they make up in ingenuity and craftsmanship.
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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3714




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« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2008, 08:21:36 PM »

hi,

no shack should be without one !

73 james
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K6AER
Member

Posts: 3483




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« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2008, 08:31:05 PM »

In much colder climates is must be  noted you should never grasp the mast with damp hands to exercise the Armstrong method while in need to visit the boys room. You may be delayed on your departure.
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KA5N
Member

Posts: 4380




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« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2008, 03:37:43 AM »

Naw, the greatest homebrewer of all hamdom was Hastifisti Scratchi of "fenix arizona."  I remember the time he put a huge rotor on his tower to turn his giant Yagi and the rotor, antenna, and tower all took off cross country like a heliocopter.
Allen
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KI4OXD
Member

Posts: 27




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« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2008, 09:42:35 AM »

Hmm...I have fueled my Armstrong rotator with beer and chocolate cake but vodka and Snickers bars sound like an interesting alternative.
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