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Author Topic: newbie question.....SSB vs FM??  (Read 4502 times)
VA7CPC
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Posts: 2392




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« Reply #30 on: April 14, 2009, 08:01:34 AM »

It's time to trot out the same old advice:

. . . Get a copy of the ARRL Amateur Radio Handbook.

It's the most "answers per dollar" you'll ever buy.

         charles
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W5GA
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Posts: 430




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« Reply #31 on: April 14, 2009, 08:27:14 AM »

And #2 would be the ARRL Antenna Book.
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W9JAB
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Posts: 70




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« Reply #32 on: April 14, 2009, 11:08:30 AM »

I always thought SSB was the Sub Sonic Blaster so I was afraid to use it.
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W0FM
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Posts: 2056




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« Reply #33 on: April 15, 2009, 12:14:15 PM »

Hi Dave and welcome.  You have received a lot of very good information here.  The questions you asked turned this thread into one of the best I've seen in years on this site.

You mentioned that you'd like to be able to listen on HF until your budget is prepared to help you enjoy it.  You also mentioned your involvment with a local amateur radio club.  I'd pretty much bet a cold one that somebody in that radio club would loan you an HF radio that you could use to listen to the activity.  A simple long wire antenna thrown into a tree is all you really need for receive only.  Make an announcement at a club function and see if anyone offers to loan you a receiver.

Keep up the learning process.  It is wonderful to see that attitude in our hobby.

73 de Terry, WØFM
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K0AX
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #34 on: April 15, 2009, 04:14:40 PM »

I would like to extend my thanks to Dave also.  This thread has turned many directions and has unearthed (ungrounded?)some great information.  I would second the recommendation of the ARRL Handbook.  It's not really a handbook anymore, it takes at least two hands, but you can open it up at random and always learn something new.  

Keep asking questions, Dave.

Ken
K0WKM
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KI4OXD
Member

Posts: 27




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« Reply #35 on: April 16, 2009, 03:24:52 AM »

Does anyone really think Dave is checking out this seven-year-old thread?
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12892




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« Reply #36 on: April 16, 2009, 05:38:55 AM »

Maybe not, but apparently others are. So maybe somebody learned something :-)
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W0FM
Member

Posts: 2056




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« Reply #37 on: April 16, 2009, 02:19:48 PM »

Bummer!  Missed the date.  

Good point, Bob.  Hopefully someone benefited from the comments this time around.  It was nice to see an impressive lack of flamers for a change.

73 de Terry, WØFM
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K3WVR
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Posts: 31




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« Reply #38 on: April 17, 2009, 08:30:17 AM »

This whole string proves that there is no such thing as a dumb question.
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KQ6Q
Member

Posts: 988




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« Reply #39 on: September 19, 2009, 07:57:00 PM »

It wasn't mentioned earlier, but you might read some books - the ARRL Handbook for Radio Communications is an essential part of a ham's library. It has chapters which explain all the technical areas of radio, and includes many projects you can build. I buy a new one every few years.
Back in ancient days before cram courses, I the Novice License manual was quite thin, and rather than memorize test questions, we actually learned the reasoning behind the correct answer. For license levels beyond novice, we even had to draw simple schematic diagrams, or understand the difference between to types of FM demodulators - the Limiter-Discriminator and the Ratio Detector - and recognize them in a schematic diagram. Nowadays, it's all done in a chip, and the only people who worry about it are the chip designers.
Get the ARRL books - the Handbook, the Operating Manual, and Getting Started with Ham Radio are some excellent titles. Join a local club, go to Field Day and see the various modes demonstrated, including VHF SSB and Satellite. Check your local public library - a local club may have donated some of the ARRL books - especially the Handbook for Radio Communications - and it's just sitting there waiting for you. When I was a novice, I used the library copy of the handbook before buying my own. In your local club, some members may have bought the newest edition, and might be happy to pass on their older editions to you. Visit, and ask!

Good luck!
Fred Wagner, KQ6Q
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