Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Slinky Antenna to Coax  (Read 1535 times)
KC9QEB
Member

Posts: 17




Ignore
« on: September 07, 2009, 08:58:04 AM »

I'm trying to attach a slinky antenna (purchased via slinkyantenna.com) to RG-6 Coax. The slinky antenna has a SO-239 end. What connector do I need to connect the antenna to the coax?

Thanks in advance for your help!
Logged
N3OX
Member

Posts: 8854


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2009, 09:02:44 AM »

I would recommend using a proper F compression connector on the RG-6 and using an F to PL-259 adapter.

You can also buy BNC compression connectors and use a BNC to PL-259 adapter.

Some people have had luck soldering to RG-6 type coax.  I don't even try.  The F connectors are cheap and easy to install... I have a couple antennas fed with "RG-6 Quad Shield" type coax from Home Depot... works fine.

73
Dan
Logged

73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
W5FYI
Member

Posts: 1044




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2009, 09:03:04 AM »

In general, PL-259 plugs attach to SO-239 sockets.
Logged
W5FYI
Member

Posts: 1044




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2009, 09:05:02 AM »

Okay, now I understand the predicament. Dan's solution makes perfect sense.
Logged
KC9QEB
Member

Posts: 17




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2009, 09:21:43 AM »

Thanks so much. Maybe I should ask a different question. I bought a DSW-40 for a great price on the classifieds. It powers up just great and now I want to (first) listen to and then eventually practice my morse (which I'm learning, slowly!) on the 40M band - making contacts with others.

I live in a 3rd floor apartment with a small balcony - I need to operate super stealth. And, soldering and wiring are not my thing - I'm a new ham with little budget and a very tight lease.

So, what would you suggest for a budget-conscious antenna? And then, what would I need - from start to finish - to attach it to my DSW-40. Yes, I know this is asking a lot...stealth, help, budget. Thanks in advance.
Logged
N3OX
Member

Posts: 8854


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2009, 09:48:40 AM »

"And, soldering and wiring are not my thing"

I would probably recommend adding those to your repertoire of skills over time.

"Effective, budget conscious 40m QRP apartment antenna" and "experimenting with home-brewed wire contraptions" are almost exactly the same thing ;-)

My honest opinion is that there's no such thing as a really good commercial apartment antenna under a couple hundred bucks, but if you do it yourself, you can build a good one for much less.  Part of the problem is that if you want to operate 40m from a balcony antenna, you might actually want it to fit your balcony like a glove, to use AS MUCH of the possible space as you can.  

I have a couple of questions...

Do you have apartments above you?  I used to live on the third floor of a three floor apartment building?

What is height, width, and depth of your balcony?

73
Dan
Logged

73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
KC9QEB
Member

Posts: 17




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2009, 10:05:49 AM »

I'm on the top floor. My little balcony is about 5'9" long by 3' wide.

I'm a new ham, so I hope to learn all the skills in the future, but right now I'm not ready to do so.
Logged
N3OX
Member

Posts: 8854


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2009, 10:17:05 AM »

Balcony got a roof over it?
Logged

73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
KC9QEB
Member

Posts: 17




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2009, 10:22:16 AM »

The roof partially overhangs.
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13163




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2009, 10:48:32 AM »

My solution in a similar situation was to stack some
furniture on the balcony and climb up onto the roof at
3AM to string a wire antenna.  In my case I just tucked
it under the shingles and dropped an end down to a
convenient window where I could pull it in without anyone
noticing.  Not the best solution for everyone, but it
worked quite well in that apartment.

You should be able to plug a length of wire right into the
back of the rig and copy plenty of 40m signals.  For
transmitting, a short slinky may be difficult to tune,
but since you have it already you might as well try it
and see for yourself.

Do you have aluminum window frames?
Logged
N3JBH
Member

Posts: 2358




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2009, 11:28:11 AM »

do you have a email address ? I might have a solution
Logged
N0FPE
Member

Posts: 362




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2009, 12:01:54 PM »

" I hope to learn all the skills in the future, but right now I'm not ready to do so. "

That says a lot right there.
Logged
K4DPK
Member

Posts: 1077


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2009, 06:10:36 PM »

Being a ham and trying to operate a station under adverse conditions requires ingenuity, knowledge and skill.

If you intend to postpone learning the skills, even the very basic ones like soldering, then I suggest you postpone operating while you read, study and acquire the skills you need.

There are two types of hams—the ones who only care to be “licensed talkers”, and the ones who realize they now possess a license to learn.  Now is an excellent time to decide which you care to be.

Phil C. Sr.
k4dpk
Logged
N5LRZ
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2009, 06:36:38 PM »

To original poster...

One begs to ask the question, why on earth is one using RG6 which when I looked it up is 75 ohm coax when the normal average amateur uses RG 8 type of coax having 50 ohms imp?  Or perhaps RG 8x aka mini 8 coax?
Logged
N3OX
Member

Posts: 8854


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2009, 06:54:16 PM »

"Being a ham and trying to operate a station under adverse conditions requires ingenuity, knowledge and skill. "

Being a new ham and having to operate a station under adverse conditions should garner relatively unprejudiced support from those with knowledge and skill.  

"If you intend to postpone learning the skills, even the very basic ones like soldering, then I suggest you postpone operating while you read, study and acquire the skills you need. "

I half agree with that.  Getting a good antenna for a QRP 40m station going from a tiny balcony is probably the least plug and play thing I can think of to start out with.  You could buy one of those MFJ apartment antennas, but it's going to be a relative waste of money.  You could buy a Buddipole which would be better, but REAL expensive compared to something you could do yourself.  

But you need to balance abstract skill acquisition with concrete skill acquisition.  Pick an antenna that you think fits your budget. It might be something of  a waste of money.  But you can start listening with it, make some contacts, and it can be modified.

One of those MFJ apartment antennas is real short for 40m... but it has a coil and a cliplead that could be used on a long wire on a fishing pole at night for better 40m performance.

I want to be encouraging, KC9QEB but I really have to be honest.  Most of the cheap apartment antennas that exist are not very good and the decent ones are very expensive (because convenience + performance demands a rather high price, apparently).  That doesn't mean that a cheap one won't get you on the air.  But it might be frustrating.  I can't really in good conscience give you a particular recommendation on a good apartment antenna in the, say, $100 range because I just think they're all ripoffs.  That doesn't mean you absolutely shouldn't go that way if that's what gets you on the air... but it does mean you'll get ripped off ;-)  Go ahead and pick one, and then figure out something better later.


A good, cheap antenna is within reach.  

Study the shorty 40 concept:

http://www.k7mem.150m.com/Electronic_Notebook/antennas/shorty_40.html

Check out a cheap 20 foot antenna support that can collapse down to a tiny thing during the day:

http://bnmpoles.com/p-119-black-widow.aspx

And when you get around to learning to solder:

http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2007/01/its_learn_to_solder_month.html

It's really a massively useful skill to have if you're an apartment dweller because as you learn you're going to quickly find that reliably joining a couple of wires is key.  You're actually less likely to **need** to know how to solder if you build a $5,000 DX station with commercial gear including pre made cables than if you build a $300 apartment QRP station.



73
Dan
Logged

73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!