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Author Topic: Field and Ecomm?  (Read 47417 times)
N8AUC
Member

Posts: 173




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« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2016, 11:18:05 AM »

You all are going to LOVE this, but sometimes the truth hurts so here we go.

First off, the biggest single issue with ham radio is the hams themselves. 
For every twenty or forty good, hobby radio enthusiast, there is one fool that sets everyone else against hams in general.
He's the fool that has big SKYWARN stickers on both doors of his car, carries a ARRL official badge, and acts as if he is the last hope for humanity.  The truth is that he's the one that everyone see's in their mind when the topic of ham radio comes up in conversation.  And the 40 or so squared away hams, being nice guys and non-confrontational will not tell the asshat that he's an asshat and makes them all look bad.  So the issue persists. 

Take a trip to a large hamfest, Dayton is the one I go to.  Now there are 10 to 20 thousand folks there.  Do you remember any of them?  I bet you do... and none of them that you remember seeing are the squared away ones.  It's the ones that look like they are homeless, or wear a hat with a big ass antenna on it.  Or in one case shit themselves that morning and didn't bother to go to the local walmart for some new pants and instead walked around with a big brown stain on their ass all day long looking for deals in the flea market.  That one was 4 or 5 years ago.... still remember that one.  Thing is, if we as hams look at this and ask ourselves WTF? how do you figure the general public see's us when they can't understand the draw to sit and use a radio with a big ass antenna on our house or car to do the same thing their cell phone will do (communicate long distances) and they can leave voicemail if the other party don't answer.  Every single function of ham radio to the uninformed and nontechnical can be done with a phone.  Send text (packet) send photos (facsimile)  voice conversation and email (traffic nets).  We understand that it will work even with no infrastructure,  they don't care.  Add poopie pants to the ham radio thing, or looking like a bum, or sever body order and you have a public relations issue plain and simple.  Do your field say on the set of DELIVERANCE (Squeal damn you) and you don't need to worry about the general public coming to interfer with your field day plans because they ain't coming anywhere around that shit even if you have free beer and hot dogs.
 
Sadly, you're absolutely right.
See, the thing is, that collectively, amateur radio operators are merely a cross section of society.
And let's face it, there are some real wackadoodles out there in the general population.
So it makes perfect sense that we will sometimes have a few people like that among our ranks.

The fool you reference, with the big SKYWARN stickers, etc. probably has a light bar on his vehicle, too.
I've encountered people like that. And it's a real embarrassment when people like that are wearing an orange ARRL badge.
If someone like that IS wearing an ARRL badge, then an SEC/DEC/EC somewhere isn't doing their job.

As for Field Day, we've sent aspiring participants home who were not dressed properly. It's a family show, folks, and
we're on display for the general public. There's nothing wrong with working up a good sweat, but grubby, grungy, and
stinky doesn't cut it.

73 de N8AUC
Eric

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N5TWB
Member

Posts: 50




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« Reply #16 on: August 10, 2016, 02:27:57 PM »

Sadly, you're absolutely right.
See, the thing is, that collectively, amateur radio operators are merely a cross section of society.
And let's face it, there are some real wackadoodles out there in the general population.
So it makes perfect sense that we will sometimes have a few people like that among our ranks.

The fool you reference, with the big SKYWARN stickers, etc. probably has a light bar on his vehicle, too.
I've encountered people like that. And it's a real embarrassment when people like that are wearing an orange ARRL badge.
If someone like that IS wearing an ARRL badge, then an SEC/DEC/EC somewhere isn't doing their job.

As for Field Day, we've sent aspiring participants home who were not dressed properly. It's a family show, folks, and
we're on display for the general public. There's nothing wrong with working up a good sweat, but grubby, grungy, and
stinky doesn't cut it.

73 de N8AUC
Eric



First paragraph: agreed - real life has sharp and unpleasant edges.

Second paragraph: please reference the ARRL criteria whereby an SEC/EC could/should remove a volunteer for whatever is on their vehicle.

Third paragraph: tough crowd, guess they don't schedule Field Day on the first day it's scheduled to go to 100 degrees in your area. Around here, you could start fresh as a daisy, directly from the shower, to begin set-up at 7am on FD Saturday. By the time operations start at 1pm CT, you can look like you just arrived from a 20-mile road march while wearing a full pack at basic training. Most clubs don't then have a separate crew of operators ready for the photo crew from QST, wearing a fresh club T-shirt and khaki slacks. 
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 2754




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« Reply #17 on: August 11, 2016, 10:16:00 AM »



[/quote] As for Field Day, we've sent aspiring participants home who were not dressed properly. It's a family show, folks, and
we're on display for the general public. There's nothing wrong with working up a good sweat, but grubby, grungy, and
stinky doesn't cut it.

73 de N8AUC
Eric


[/quote]     Absolutely agree!   This year a young ham showed up with his 18 YO girlfriend, who was wearing about the least that one could get away with in public!  She made many of the older hams uncomfortable, and one ham remarked that he was getting QRN from the number of pacemakers that were being triggered!!    Roll Eyes
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N8AUC
Member

Posts: 173




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« Reply #18 on: August 12, 2016, 07:46:54 AM »

As for Field Day, we've sent aspiring participants home who were not dressed properly. It's a family show, folks, and
we're on display for the general public. There's nothing wrong with working up a good sweat, but grubby, grungy, and
stinky doesn't cut it.

73 de N8AUC
Eric



First paragraph: agreed - real life has sharp and unpleasant edges.

Second paragraph: please reference the ARRL criteria whereby an SEC/EC could/should remove a volunteer for whatever is on their vehicle.

Third paragraph: tough crowd, guess they don't schedule Field Day on the first day it's scheduled to go to 100 degrees in your area. Around here, you could start fresh as a daisy, directly from the shower, to begin set-up at 7am on FD Saturday. By the time operations start at 1pm CT, you can look like you just arrived from a 20-mile road march while wearing a full pack at basic training. Most clubs don't then have a separate crew of operators ready for the photo crew from QST, wearing a fresh club T-shirt and khaki slacks. 

I probably worded that wrong.
It's not THAT tough of a crowd. Field Day is a picnic like atmosphere. Jeans or shorts and a T-shirt, sneakers, are what is expected.

In the past, we've had some "interesting characters" show up at Field Day who had to be sent home. And it's really a pretty rare occurrence. But it has happened.
Wearing barely enough to keep from getting arrested, and what they were wearing would allow them to pass for a hooker trolling for business.
That's not the kind of image you want to present to someone who might be encountering amateur radio for the first time, especially if there are young kids around.

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N5TWB
Member

Posts: 50




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« Reply #19 on: August 12, 2016, 01:52:07 PM »

As for Field Day, we've sent aspiring participants home who were not dressed properly. It's a family show, folks, and
we're on display for the general public. There's nothing wrong with working up a good sweat, but grubby, grungy, and
stinky doesn't cut it.

73 de N8AUC
Eric



First paragraph: agreed - real life has sharp and unpleasant edges.

Second paragraph: please reference the ARRL criteria whereby an SEC/EC could/should remove a volunteer for whatever is on their vehicle.

Third paragraph: tough crowd, guess they don't schedule Field Day on the first day it's scheduled to go to 100 degrees in your area. Around here, you could start fresh as a daisy, directly from the shower, to begin set-up at 7am on FD Saturday. By the time operations start at 1pm CT, you can look like you just arrived from a 20-mile road march while wearing a full pack at basic training. Most clubs don't then have a separate crew of operators ready for the photo crew from QST, wearing a fresh club T-shirt and khaki slacks. 

I probably worded that wrong.
It's not THAT tough of a crowd. Field Day is a picnic like atmosphere. Jeans or shorts and a T-shirt, sneakers, are what is expected.

In the past, we've had some "interesting characters" show up at Field Day who had to be sent home. And it's really a pretty rare occurrence. But it has happened.
Wearing barely enough to keep from getting arrested, and what they were wearing would allow them to pass for a hooker trolling for business.
That's not the kind of image you want to present to someone who might be encountering amateur radio for the first time, especially if there are young kids around.



Agreed on the family/picnic atmosphere where the general public can feel comfortable interacting with members whose actions, attitudes, and dress bring credit to the organization. It certainly shouldn't be a peep show or resemble a red light district. You have very realistic expectations.
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LONESTRANGER
Member

Posts: 9




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« Reply #20 on: August 19, 2016, 08:43:18 AM »

[


[/quote]     Absolutely agree!   This year a young ham showed up with his 18 YO girlfriend, who was wearing about the least that one could get away with in public! 

Wish we had that problem.
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LONESTRANGER
Member

Posts: 9




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« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2016, 08:50:48 AM »

Field day is a contest/social event, nothing more, quit fooling yourselves.   In a real emergency, one that will probably never happen to the vast majority of us, people will stay home and take care of their family, their homes, and themselves, and perhaps close neighbors.  Stay out of the way and let the REAL authorities do their jobs.
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W7ASA
Member

Posts: 343




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« Reply #22 on: August 19, 2016, 01:41:28 PM »

"Real authorities ..."

In small scale emergencies we have -generally- excellent emergency services. In a large scale disruption of infrastructure, The System(tm) is very often overwhelmed. I know, because I've been through real emergencies and assisted when able. It's not 'all or nothing' , but help where you can and stay out of the way where you cannot.

An aspect of waiting for 'the real authorities' is the slow and sometimes political criteria for doling out of (tax payer paid-for ) government assistance after impact. From Stalin to the current administration, it is usually cities first and rural last. If you're a mid-West farmer under three feet of semifrozen river water , or small towns in a fire or hurricane struck region - oh well, you're on your own, so you'd better hope that your fellow citizens are volunteering to help those unable to help themselves. This is why volunteers are usually seen as more helpful in non-urban areas, rather than in urban areas.

Volunteerism and its perceived value varies by region and mindset of emergency managers.

73 de Ray ..._ ._
« Last Edit: August 19, 2016, 02:05:55 PM by W7ASA » Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 2754




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« Reply #23 on: August 19, 2016, 06:12:17 PM »




"Absolutely agree!   This year a young ham showed up with his 18 YO girlfriend, who was wearing about the least that one could get away with in public!" 

  Wish we had that problem. [/quote]
                                                                                                                                                                  LOL!!  You don't understand how bad it was.  Hams were having a hard time even concentrating on their radios!   One ham brought his wife along, and when she saw him staring at that girl she started beating him with his 2m/440 mag mount!!!  Shocked
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N5TWB
Member

Posts: 50




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« Reply #24 on: Today at 08:05:05 AM »

An aspect of waiting for 'the real authorities' is the slow and sometimes political criteria for doling out of (tax payer paid-for ) government assistance after impact. From Stalin to the current administration, it is usually cities first and rural last. If you're a mid-West farmer under three feet of semifrozen river water , or small towns in a fire or hurricane struck region - oh well, you're on your own, so you'd better hope that your fellow citizens are volunteering to help those unable to help themselves. This is why volunteers are usually seen as more helpful in non-urban areas, rather than in urban areas.

Volunteerism and its perceived value varies by region and mindset of emergency managers.

73 de Ray ..._ ._

QFT and worthy of a repeat, IMNSHO. Throw in the different relative proximities to a major media market with the shift of type and duration of coverage to get a better understanding of the differences in need and the appreciation for volunteerism of every kind. The news cycle works as reliably as the sunspot cycle only faster.
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