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Author Topic: What receiver/scanner for emergency use by (relatively ) ignorant user?  (Read 1152 times)
KD0ZGW
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Posts: 483




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« on: September 23, 2016, 09:29:06 AM »

I am a ham with family that lives in the cascadia subduction zone in the Pacific Northwest.  A very severe quake is possible. I would like to find an easy to use receiver for them.   Neither is a ham.  Looking for suggestions.  I think 12v a plus.

73's
KD0ZGW
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K5AJ
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2016, 12:04:13 PM »

Hi,

You might want to point them to AOR receivers, which can handle the entire spectrum and most modes.

For VHF and above, you might want to point them to leading scanner makers such as Uniden, for scanners that can handle trunking and digital.  Above all. I think you should take your question to the radioreference.com website.

You'll probably get varied opinions from others who reply.

73/Jack
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ONAIR
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Posts: 2842




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« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2016, 12:40:12 PM »

I am a ham with family that lives in the cascadia subduction zone in the Pacific Northwest.  A very severe quake is possible. I would like to find an easy to use receiver for them.   Neither is a ham.  Looking for suggestions.  I think 12v a plus.

73's
KD0ZGW
   I would get them an 11 meter radio as well.  When hurricane Sandy came in and took out the power, landlines, internet and cell phone towers, the only non hams who were still able to communicate and call for help were the ones who had CB radios.
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NA4IT
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Posts: 1042


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« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2016, 04:05:57 AM »

First, find out what frequencies are available in that area by going to RadioReference.com.

Then look for a scanner that can monitor those frequencies.

Ditto on being able to run from 12VDC, or from a small DC to AC converter and battery. Or a portable scanner with outdoor antenna (if needed).

If the authorities are on 800MHz, it could get expensive. If not, and you can find evidence they are not upgrading any time soon, you might could use a cheaper scanner.

11 meters (CB)... eh depends on if there is a local group. Having an FRS radio could be a plus, maybe a MURS radio.

It's hard to get neighborhood groups started, but the ones that have and kept it up love it.
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 2842




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« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2016, 11:47:48 AM »

Check if there is a R.E.A.C.T group in the area.    www.ReactIntl.org
« Last Edit: September 24, 2016, 12:09:29 PM by ONAIR » Logged
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