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Author Topic: Has It Really Become Easier To Earn A Ham License?  (Read 30010 times)
N9AOP
Member

Posts: 161




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« Reply #75 on: December 18, 2014, 09:28:28 AM »

Given enough time, there will only be no-code extras.  And given enough time
the FCC will allow open book testing.  After all, we don't want to discriminate
against morons.
Art
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K2GWK
Member

Posts: 540


WWW

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« Reply #76 on: December 19, 2014, 06:16:28 AM »

Given enough time, there will only be no-code extras.  And given enough time
the FCC will allow open book testing.  After all, we don't want to discriminate
against morons.
Art

or Smart Asses, right Art?
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Guy
Lawn Guyland, New York

K2GWK Website
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2844




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« Reply #77 on: December 19, 2014, 06:44:13 PM »

Given enough time, there will only be no-code extras.  And given enough time
the FCC will allow open book testing.  After all, we don't want to discriminate
against morons.
Art

Discriminating against the illiterate?
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K6CPO
Member

Posts: 173




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« Reply #78 on: December 21, 2014, 11:35:18 AM »

Given enough time, there will only be no-code extras.  And given enough time
the FCC will allow open book testing.  After all, we don't want to discriminate
against morons.
Art

I think they'd eliminate all testing (like CB) before they'd go to open-book tests...
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W8JX
Member

Posts: 6733




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« Reply #79 on: December 22, 2014, 07:17:26 AM »

I think they'd eliminate all testing (like CB) before they'd go to open-book tests...

They are nearly open book now. If it had been this easy when I started over 45 years ago I would of gotten my extra at start.
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--------------------------------------
You can embrace new computer/tablet technology and change with it or cling to old fall far behind....
KM4FMK
Member

Posts: 102




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« Reply #80 on: December 22, 2014, 11:01:37 AM »

Read it all, not just the first few lines to make sure you get the entire point.... Too often people read the first sentence and then go spewing off and ranting because they failed to read the entire thing:

The biggest problem I have with being recently licensed myself is these old timers who are bitter that new hams do not have to do everything they did 50 years ago like CW, or when they built their own systems or spent as much as a new car for a radio, and think us new hams are nothing but clueless kids who think ham radio is clicking a button like on smart phones, or somehow equate us with crude clueless CB users with a call sign. They believe they somehow got screwed just because of the era they were born. Yet from how I see it, without the updated rules and altered testing requirements, ham radio would be dying as they got older and died off, taking it with them. They have a hard time changing with the times.

I do not have a problem with the older generation, there have been several very helpful great elmers and elders that have helped me along. Many of them are tired of dealing with 100 ft long antenna wires and all the equipment that goes along with HF, so they're going back to basics with 2/70 rigs.

Us new hams are not starting in HF or as an Extra, just like most other new hams we are starting with very little and working our way up. Many times I am ignored, or worse given an attitude because less than a year in I don't know it all, simply because they think we should. Just because they spent 20 years in the early radio industry during which they got their license, yet somehow because I did not makes me less than an equal. It just seems that so with many of these older hams, when they took their test, color TV was just being released so they've forgotten what it's like to start anew, nor what it is like to start new today. 50 years ago they did not have the distractions we do today.... Big screen tvs, cable TV, computers, Internet, tablets, smart phones, laptops, texting, and a million other things striving to tear our attention away that did not exist when most of these long time hams started.

For me and many others, it is nice to turn the radio on, scan the channels, sit back and talk to someone at random and tune out the rest of the technology, even if only for a few minutes. Just because we're using a $35 Baofeng with a $20 mag mount does not make us less worthy to carry a call sign, just as you with your $500 mobile system and $150 antenna on your vehicles does not make you any more worthy.

We're all licensed amateur radio people, new and old, we all started out with very little and working our way up, so there is no reason for the attitudes and division. If you're really that unhappy with all the changed testing requirements and new hams, I think it is time for you to sell your equipment and get out of it, or stick with HF and don't bother with local groups or local VHF/UHF. Let the helpful elmers do what they do and help new hams work their way up.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2014, 11:07:20 AM by KM4FMK » Logged
AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1651




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« Reply #81 on: December 23, 2014, 06:30:23 AM »

Read it all, not just the first few lines to make sure you get the entire point.... Too often people read the first sentence and then go spewing off and ranting because they failed to read the entire thing:

Read it all... thumbs up  Wink
Totally agree.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
WX7G
Member

Posts: 6352




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« Reply #82 on: Yesterday at 02:12:34 AM »

A review of the post that started this thread and subsequent posts by KB1WSY are in order.

The first post in this thread shows an actual essay question British test of 1971. KB1WSY then compares it to the U.S. multiple choice General test of 2012 and I quote him here:

"Concerning the U.S. General test that I passed in early 2012, I prepared by using the ARRL license manual. If you do this thoroughly, taking in all of the material (and not just memorizing the answers to the multiple-choice questions), you will know just as much as what was in the British test. In fact, you will know more: a larger number of rather disparate facts and electronic theory, much larger than what we were required to know 40 years ago, although forming a rather odd whole. Part of that has to do with the explosion in ham communication modes."

Who here has taken an FCC essay style amateur radio test and how did it compare to the British test?
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 02:20:21 AM by WX7G » Logged
WD3N
Member

Posts: 14




Ignore
« Reply #83 on: Today at 01:46:42 PM »

The requirement to know code ended How many years ago  ? Roll Eyes
Code is optional ,just like the military ,or are you unhappy that the draft ended  too ?
Nothing stays the same ,time marches on ....blah blah blah .


Is it easy to get Extra class ?

Yes it is if you really want it .
All you have to do is read some books and study things . Huh
Take some tests and pass .

Nice people administer the tests , so no pressure there .
Go ahead and do it  , take test test .
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