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Author Topic: extra call sign  (Read 8640 times)
K7MEM
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« Reply #30 on: November 25, 2016, 04:00:58 AM »

Not only was there no keeping the call sign, with the "WN" prefix, there was no keeping the license. When I got my license in 1965, the Novice license was for one year only and was not renewable.

I got mine in 69 and it was good for 2 years and I believe it could be renewed once but only after a 6 month lapse.

The 2 year Novice license was part of the "Incentive Licensing" initiative. While the FCC and the ARRL proposed it in 1964, it was not put into effect until 1968. That was a little too late for me. By then, I was going to college and working full time, so I didn't have a lot of time for ham radio. So you got in at the right time. In 1978, the Novice license became a 5 year renewable license. I'm not sure when they kicked all the license terms to 10 years.
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W8JX
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« Reply #31 on: November 25, 2016, 06:21:37 AM »

Not only was there no keeping the call sign, with the "WN" prefix, there was no keeping the license. When I got my license in 1965, the Novice license was for one year only and was not renewable.

I got mine in 69 and it was good for 2 years and I believe it could be renewed once but only after a 6 month lapse.

The 2 year Novice license was part of the "Incentive Licensing" initiative. While the FCC and the ARRL proposed it in 1964, it was not put into effect until 1968. That was a little too late for me. By then, I was going to college and working full time, so I didn't have a lot of time for ham radio. So you got in at the right time. In 1978, the Novice license became a 5 year renewable license. I'm not sure when they kicked all the license terms to 10 years.


I was never aware of a 5 year novice ticket that was renewable. It has been 10 years on most tickets for as long as I can remember. (at least sometime in 80's). I upgrade to a 13 WPM "conditional" in early 70"s and it was later commuted to a General when it was renewed. I went to Advanced in early 80's and I am pretty sure it was 10 years since then. It was early 90's before I crossed the 20wpm barrier for Extra. Had it not been for that I would of held a extra long before that.
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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20 WPM Extra
W3HF
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« Reply #32 on: November 25, 2016, 06:31:20 AM »

I do believe that at some point the Novice license was changed to renewable, but WN callsigns were not automatically replaced with a WA or WB. In the 80s and early 90s, before the vanity program occurred, you would sometimes run into a WN 2 x 3 call on the air.  It wasn't common, but they were out there.  Some big contester even had a KN 2 x 3, from the much earlier days when novices were given KN 2 x 3 calls, and then they dropped the N when they upgraded. Not sure how he was able to keep that one.

73 John AF5CC

John -

Sorry, but that's not true. All Novice callsigns that were active as of 1 October 1976 were converted into their permanent versions. This applied not only to the WN prefixes in the lower 48, but the WL calls in Alaska, the WH calls in the pacific, and the WP calls in the Caribbean. I was one of those converted calls--WN2FKS issued in May or so of 1976, converted into WA2FKS as a Novice later that year, and upgraded to Tech in February of 1977. You can even see this documented in the callbooks of the era.

The few calls you ran into are an artifact of hams being able to reclaim former calls. If a Novice had their license expire prior to 1 October 76, then the call wouldn't have been upgraded--it would have stayed in the FCC license archives as a WN. If that person re-tested for another Novice license after the conversion (since the restriction on getting a second Novice had been lifted), and if that person requested on the form to reclaim his/her former callsign, the FCC would re-issue the WN prefix (since that was the former callsign) and the WN would never be converted. (By the way, this was documented in an article in QST in May 1994 by Phil Sager and Rick Palm.)

I know personally of one of those cases, but I'm sure there are others. Ron Notarius (now W3WN) received WN3VAW in 1973. That license expired in 1975, but he requested and received it again after the conversion. (He held it then for 30 years.) Your KN example was probably the same thing, although the gap between Novice licenses was probably around 20 years.

Your observation that these cases weren't common is circumstantial evidence that these were special cases.

Steve
W3HF
« Last Edit: November 25, 2016, 06:34:23 AM by W3HF » Logged
W3HF
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« Reply #33 on: November 25, 2016, 06:40:43 AM »

I was never aware of a 5 year novice ticket that was renewable. It has been 10 years on most tickets for as long as I can remember. (at least sometime in 80's). I upgrade to a 13 WPM "conditional" in early 70"s and it was later commuted to a General when it was renewed. I went to Advanced in early 80's and I am pretty sure it was 10 years since then. It was early 90's before I crossed the 20wpm barrier for Extra. Had it not been for that I would of held a extra long before that.

Novice license became 5-year renewable in the late 1970s, a few years after the distinctive prefixes were converted. It may have been in 1978, at the same time as the big change to the Group A/B/C/D callsign system. The ten-year terms didn't start until 1984.

By the way, Rod Dinkins (formerly AC6V, now SK) had a very extensive web site that has been taken over by his son Jeff (who now holds his dad's call). Rod had (and Jeff now maintains) a great page on the  history of amateur radio and licensing in the USA. 
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N0NB
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« Reply #34 on: December 06, 2016, 11:32:30 AM »

I was never aware of a 5 year novice ticket that was renewable.

I received my Novice in early November 1983 and it was a five year renewable license.  As I recall the ten year term came in just after that as I recall my Technician in January 1985 and certainly my Advanced in October 1985 were for ten year terms.

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73, de Nate
Bremen, KS

SKCC 6225
WA2ISE
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« Reply #35 on: December 07, 2016, 03:54:49 PM »

Oh, the FCC says you are allowed just one call sign, and not any extra...   Grin
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K7MEM
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« Reply #36 on: Yesterday at 04:03:40 AM »

Oh, the FCC says you are allowed just one call sign, and not any extra...   Grin

Yes, that is true today. However, in the 50's an 60s a US ham could hold both a Technician and Novice licenses at the same. Each license had different band privileges.
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W9RND
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« Reply #37 on: Yesterday at 04:10:35 PM »


in the 50's an 60s a US ham could hold both a Technician and Novice licenses at the same. Each license had different band privileges.


 Shocked  Shocked  Shocked  Shocked

i would love to watch a ham radio history trivia gameshow with the winner receiving some fancy rig, antenna, or DXpedition vacation  Grin
it would be cool to hear all the nooks and crannies of ham radio history revealed
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W8JX
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« Reply #38 on: Yesterday at 04:25:37 PM »


Yes, that is true today. However, in the 50's an 60s a US ham could hold both a Technician and Novice licenses at the same. Each license had different band privileges.


I was under the understanding that a Technician always had novice privileges too. The test required same 5 WPM and same basic theory with a additional test for tech privileges.
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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20 WPM Extra
K7MEM
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« Reply #39 on: Today at 05:49:28 AM »


Yes, that is true today. However, in the 50's an 60s a US ham could hold both a Technician and Novice licenses at the same. Each license had different band privileges.


I was under the understanding that a Technician always had novice privileges too. The test required same 5 WPM and same basic theory with a additional test for tech privileges.

In the mid 60s (1965 when I got my license), the same 5 WPM test was required for the Technician license. But the Technician license did not include any low band privileges. The written test was essentially the General class written test. The Technician licensee received 6 Meter access, that was equivalent to a General class license. Plus, all amateur privileges on 220 and above. The only privilege match between the Novice and Technician was 2 meters, where the access was limited to 145-147 MHz. And, at that time, the Novice license had a one year term and was not renewable. So, if you tested for a Technician license, while your Novice was still active, your Novice license was still valid and you would have had two call signs.

The Technician license was not considered an upgrade. The FCC intended for Novice licensees to upgrade to General. The Technician license was intended for experimenters and radio control of model aircraft. That never really panned out, so they adjusted the privileges in (IIRC) 1968. IMHO, if they intended it for radio control, they should have made it separate from the Amateur Radio service.

Back then, I could only afford one crystal for my Heathkit Twoer. So I logically looked at the frequency limits and chose a crystal that put me right in the middle of the band, 146 MHz. There weren't any repeaters at the time and FM was not common, so I used that frequency for a long time. It would have been better if I picked something around 145.5 MHz, because not many hams tuned that high in the band. But after a while, everyone got use to me being high in the band.
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