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Author Topic: New to HAM what is range?  (Read 559 times)
ANDREW86
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Posts: 4




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« on: March 27, 2003, 10:43:57 PM »

Hey.
I'm new to the HAM Radio scene thinking of getting a licence with a friend.

Here is my question. Is it possible to talk to my friend that has a cottage 250km away from my house? How could that be done and what kind of equipment would I be looking at?

thanks,
andrew
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WA4PTZ
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Posts: 528




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« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2003, 05:59:40 AM »

Part of the responsibility of becoming a HAM is to
learn. This is a LEARNING hobby. Study "Propagation"
and learn how it is done, then you will be equipped
with the knowledge for future endeavors.
73 - Tim
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KD5USS
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Posts: 1


WWW

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« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2003, 11:39:12 AM »

And part of the respnsibility of BEING a ham is to assist others and promote the hobby of amateur radio.

Andrew, the quick answer to your question is yes it is possible.  There are many ways this could be accomplished though.  If the terrain is fairly flat you could do it on 2m FM simplex if both of you were working with directional antennas, such as a Yagi.  Other options could be anywhere else in the bands allocated to us if the conditions are correct.  

Give some specifics about the terrain and your possible set-ups, and I feel certain you will get some more replys that can help you much more than I can.

As the first poster stated, this hobby is a learn as you go hobby and LOTS of information is out there.  Look on the web and open a few books.  You will be amazed at just what all is possible in amateur radio.

Charlie
KD5USS
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N5CTI
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Posts: 69




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« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2003, 12:51:17 PM »

In addition to Charlie's reply about there being many radios, frequencies and antennas you could use, there are also many different modes available to you, too. I'm sure you had a voice mode in mind, and Charlie specifically mentioned FM, but you could also do 2m SSB, which would likely extend your range beyond what you could achieve with 2m FM. Maybe you'd like to also use one of the digital modes, such as packet. You'd also have the opportunity to practice Morse code together, still on 2m. Maybe you'd want to use SSTV to shoot pictures back and forth. And on, and on...

That's one of the beauties of this hobby: there are so many different things to do, it's hard to imagine ever getting bored with it. And if you do, it's probably your own fault. ;-)

Good luck!

Boyd / N5CTI
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AA8RF
Member

Posts: 67




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« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2003, 12:13:45 PM »

Andrew,

Yes, as posted above there are many ways to do this. You might be able to get started with $200 in used equipment to do what you want. With new equipment you could probably get going for $500 per end depending on terain and exactly where the 2 stations are.  If you don't mind learning morse code you could certainly accomplist what you want for <$1000 per end for new equipment and a lot less for used.

-Jim
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KI8DJ
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Posts: 190




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« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2003, 12:19:37 PM »

I hope you do become a ham you will enjoy it. My advice is to get an hf rig that has 2 meter capability,and a high gain beam antenna at least 10 elements.With similar setups on each end you should be able to work each other quite well,assuming you don't have a mountain in between. You should have 100 watts or so output power.Also if you upgrade to general class this distance can be spanned by 5 or 10 watts on 40 or 75 meters. Good Luck Gary ki8dj
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12893




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« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2003, 10:04:39 PM »

250kM (155 miles) is a pretty good haul for 2M on a consistant basis unless you have some gain antennas (Yagi) up pretty high in the air (or you are located on a couple of mountains). The 75 meter band during the night or 40 meters during the day using a couple of wire dipole antennas would be a better choice for that distance unless you have some fantastic terrain or are into 100-foot towers.
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