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Author Topic: HAM RADIO'S RELATION TO MUSIC  (Read 521 times)
AE4TR
Member

Posts: 43




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« on: July 06, 2003, 10:26:07 AM »

I was just wondering if anyone beside me has thought about the relation between Ham Radio and Music.  For instance,  if a person is a music player, reader, writer, or whatever, it seems to me that learning the morse code comes a lot easier for them, than for those who know no music whatsoever. When sending the rythm seems to be a natural thing, the spacing seems to be perfect, and of course receiving is exceptionally easy.  Am I dreaming or is this a fact?  I surmise this does not mean that one should learn music first, but there is an advantage to knowing and playing music.
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WA4MJF
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Posts: 1003




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« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2003, 02:24:04 PM »

Well, there is a relationship.  I learned many
moons ago, when I was just a little ham, that
YLs and XYLs are better at code them we guys are.
The reason is somethin' in a girls genes make the
fair sex more musically inclined than guys and therefore they do code better.  There was an
XYL (SK now) that used to do Drake ads and she
did 60 wpm plus!
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KC8AXJ
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Posts: 303




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« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2003, 06:30:09 PM »

The Rhythm of the Code


http://www.edisongreen.com/kawa/
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GREENEGGSANDHAM
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Posts: 26




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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2003, 06:46:05 PM »

I agree.  I think that those who are 'musically inclined' tend to be 'wired' in such a way that they are capable of learning code much easier.  I'm not sure I understand exactly why things are like that, but I'm guessing it has something to do with the ability to discern the rhythms in the code the same way one discerns rhythms in music.  I guess we musicians just have all of the neccessary filters and DSP built in. hi hi!

I had very little trouble learning the code fairly quickly.  It did require work on my part, but I didn't experience the severe mental block or frustration that I've heard many others complain about so bitterly.  I did, however, reach a plateau at about 15wpm that I never was able move past.  But, I also didn't put in the same kind of effort to increase my speed that I did when first learning it, either.
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KG4OOA
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Posts: 24


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« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2003, 11:25:30 PM »

I have two left feet and the only musical instrument that I can play is a stereo CD player. I have no musical ability whatsoever. I copy CW between 15 and 25 WPM depending on how I feel.

That said, that is the only way to learn the code and attain any speed. any other method is doomed to fail. Morse code is based on the rhythm or beat of the character. (When someone types code in a thread, i.e.
--.- ... .-.. I have trouble with it because it isn't natural.) I have a feeling that is one of the reasons some many new hams are having trouble learning the code.

Most people remember a song by the beat or rhythm. It is the same way with the characters of the code. Each one has a different beat or rhythm. For instance the character Q is dahdahdidah, it almost sounds like pay day today. Try it. Work from thre simplest character to the longest character and build words along the way.

Also, buy a key and osscilator. Just because you don't have to send for the test, practice sending. It helps to make the code fun. Better yet practice with a friend.

You know, you just might have some fun.

73,
Bob
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