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Author Topic: Should I become a ham?  (Read 1109 times)
KC8VWM
Member

Posts: 3124




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« Reply #15 on: October 27, 2003, 11:50:24 AM »


Don't sweat the code stuff. Rome wasn't built in a day.
Get your tech license first and then worry about CW.

Chances are pretty good that when you an Amateur License, you will start studying CW anyways.

Personally, I don't believe in code tapes or other maketing ploys to loose weight, learn code by hypnosis etc..

The best way to study code is to actually listen to code live on the air.

Start by looking for "slo code" op's. Get the sched's of W1AW on the air code sessions.

It doesn't matter if you don't get "all" the code characters sent at first. You will be able to "construct" the rest of the sent messages by "guessing." For example the word WHAT might be received as W(blank)AT, or the message will be like this,  "W_AT is your QTH."

Try to memorize all the "vowels" first. Numbers are always easy to understand as they are setup in a sequence. Don't try to memorize too much all at once.
Focus on specifics.

Memorize how your call sign in Morse Code sounds like.
Don't worry about the dots and dashes, just listen to the sound of your callsign like it is a musical tune playing from your favorite CD or something.

Then try sending the alphabet using a key. See how fast and accurately you can do this over time.

You get the picture, pretty soon you will know CW before you even realize it.

73

KC8VWM


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KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3710




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« Reply #16 on: October 30, 2003, 12:26:40 AM »

Hi,

Here is a link for the band chart with the class and modes.  Even seasoned operators have a chart at their station.  

http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/bands.html

For antenna, here is another great resource:

http://www.cebik.com

With your EE knowledge you should have no trouble.
Take a few tests here online in the test section.

73 james
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N2MG
Administrator

Posts: 121



« Reply #17 on: October 31, 2003, 01:28:56 PM »

Sure, become a ham!

Ignore the the cranky types you may see posting here from time to time - and the ones on the air.  They've seemingly nothing better to do.

GL.

Mike N2MG
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KC0LET
Member

Posts: 58




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« Reply #18 on: November 02, 2003, 03:19:45 PM »

Go for it!  Just wanted to pass on some advice, when learning the code I did not pass on the first time around, but then a friend suggested the G4FON morse code software.  The program can be downloaded for free at http://www.qsl.net/g4fon/ . Click on "Koch CW Trainer" on the menu on the left of the page.  This program helped me nail down the code in about a month.

Good Luck, and hope to hear you on the air soon.
KC0LET
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