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Author Topic: Relays for remote coax switch?  (Read 468 times)
KC0PZE
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Posts: 6




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« on: February 13, 2005, 06:34:42 PM »

Looking for a source for relays or solenoids to build a remote coax switch. Any Ideas?
Thanks
Ed
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20666




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« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2005, 08:09:03 AM »

I'd just buy a surplus commercial remote coax switch.  I've homebrewed my own using inexpensive relays, but by the time I was finished (printed circuit board, connectors, enclosure, etc) they usually turned out to be more expensive, and not nearly as good, as simply buying a commercial surplus unit.

Transco made remote coaxial switches for fifty years (and they still do), most of which used type N connectors and used coaxial construction internally to provide excellent performance to 3 GHz or higher, with such low crosstalk that it's almost immeasurable.  They all handle legal limit power.  And they can often be found in 6-port versions for about $50 surplus.  You need to provide your own power source (power supply and switch!) for the shack, but the switch itself is sealed and weatherproof.  Hard to beat this kind of deal, as I found out after homebrewing a few switches that easily cost $100 each when I was finished with them!

WB2WIK/6
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KC7FKW
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2005, 08:16:02 AM »

A relative inexpensive method using an A/B type ant switch, determined by your own or a friends mechanical skills, ; 1)take an ordinary antenna switch, and remove its knob  2)devise a means of attachment of a suitable lever to the switch shaft  3)aquire an automotive electric door/trunk/hood activ-ating solenoid  4)wire it up, to control both the ext-ention and retraction {and removal of power, after the change of position is completed} 5) measure the travel distance , to determine distance on the lever out from the shaft, (think of a toilets lever/chain action) include some freeplay, so things don't bind up 6)place in a suitable weatherproof enclosure 7) enjoy the fun of doing it yourself aspect of the hobby !!!
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