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Author Topic: Wildlife Tracking Frequencies?  (Read 1952 times)
RADIOHEAD
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Posts: 97




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« on: April 15, 2005, 08:40:58 AM »

I was testing a VHF antenna the other day when I came across what sounded like telemetry in the 40 MHz range, more specifically, it started at 40.011 through 40.841. According to the FCC the only bands allocated to wildlife tracking are the 40.660 - 40.700 ISM band and the 216 MHz band. Does anyone have anymore information about this? Curious minds want to know.



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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13230




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« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2005, 12:02:56 PM »

There is a lot of information on Wildlife Tracking on the
Homing In web page (www.homingin.com).  This comes from a
number of requests from researchers asking for hams to
help track migrating birds, etc.  There are links there
to other information as well.  Some of the birds tracked
were in the 150 or 170 MHz range.

Generally a transmitter needs to operate for several
months to be useful, and needs to be small enough not to
inconvenience the bird (or other animal) carrying it.
You won't find much continuous telemetry being sent unless
it is a pretty good sized animal that doesn't wander far
so the batteries can be changed.  (A bear, for example.)
Otherwise you will get very short pips out of the
transmitter at very low power, often unmodulated.

There are other telemetry sources that are more likely,
such as water/snowpack monitoring.  Perhaps you can
make a small DF loop and track down the signal?
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RADIOHEAD
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Posts: 97




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« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2005, 04:20:52 PM »

The info in that link was a good read, but I'm a little confused. How come they're using frequencies in the 150.3 MHz range? The FCC Frequency allocation chart says it's for Mobile & Fixed  - Government Exclusive use only. Am I reading the chart wrong?



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KG4RUL
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Posts: 2718


WWW

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« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2005, 04:27:22 AM »

If the bear is on public land, then it belongs to the Government and if it is moving, it is mobile.  Seem to fit to me!

Dennis KG4RUL Smiley
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RADIOHEAD
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Posts: 97




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« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2005, 05:24:37 AM »

Yeah that makes perfect sense now. Thanks for the clarification.

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RADIOHEAD
Member

Posts: 97




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« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2005, 05:28:17 AM »

My question still stands. Any takers?
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DROLLTROLL
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Posts: 265




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« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2005, 08:51:49 AM »

"The FCC Frequency allocation chart says it's for Mobile & Fixed - Government Exclusive use only. Am I reading the chart wrong?"

What's not to understand? The State (read government) Fish and Game commission, Wildlife Management, or whatever, decide to do a migratory study. Who's frequency should they use?
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RADIOHEAD
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Posts: 97




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« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2005, 11:37:37 AM »

Oh boy. Now I just feel silly.

For some reason when I think "Wildlife Tracking" I think of biology students doing some sort of research, never thought of the Fish & Game Commission, etc. Oops.





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KE7DFP
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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2005, 03:34:42 PM »

Don't forget r/c modelers.  Folks are into serious, cross country radio controlled gliders that have telemtry beacons on themso theycan be recovered 50 mi. or more from where the flight started.  I hunt with trained falcons (falconry) and we radio tag our peregrines, but we use 151, but mostly 216 mhz.  I know the R/C people are wat down there around 50 Mhz.  Fish and Game is about 90% of the business for telemetry manufactures.  No bird would be tagged at that low of freq, because of antenna size.  But Elk , Bear, wolf, might use something like that.
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KE4SKY
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« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2005, 05:25:08 AM »

USFWS is a government use and a bird tracker is a mobile station.  
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WA4MJF
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Posts: 1003




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« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2005, 01:46:20 PM »

But they the Feds and NTIA gives them freqs, not the
FCC.   I would think that they are talking about
state and local governments as that is the government
that the FCC regulates.

73 de Ronnie
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