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Author Topic: What model AF pilot rescue beacon ca. 1962?  (Read 435 times)
KE7FFX
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« on: September 09, 2008, 07:45:50 PM »

Among the HAM community, is there anyone who is knowledgable of the type of personal rescue beacon and survival gear that was carried by F-102-A stateside pilots in 1962?

I am interested in the frequencies such models could have transmitted, whether capable of functioning as a transponder.  Did stateside aircraft have any automatic crash locators?  

Was there a protocol for orange colored apparel, survival raft, or parachute in stateside exercises?

Regards,
John, KE7FFX
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WW5AA
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« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2008, 08:46:10 AM »

Your stretching the old brain cells here! I don't recall any survival gear stateside. My F-102 used the Sperry Emergency locator transponder which I think was still on 121.5. We were equiped with a HT emergency radio on TAC SAR somewhere around 383. something...to many years ago!

73 de Lindy
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WW5AA
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« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2008, 09:10:12 AM »

...and we still called the HT a walky-talky (:-)

73 de Lindy
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NA0AA
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Posts: 1043




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« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2008, 01:31:46 PM »

http://beacons.amsa.gov.au/Beacon_monitoring/History_of_the_system.asp

I'm not sure they had 'em back then, see the above reference page.

I'd ask my Dad, who was AF in the '50's but he unfortunately will not remember anymore.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2008, 10:44:34 AM »

NATO ones used 243 MHz: in Europe, they were called SARBE (Search And Rescue Beacon Equipment). A major manufacturer was a company called Burndept in south east London. I have a set of circuit diagrams for one model of them: the search aircraft equipment used two antennas for homing.
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NA0AA
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« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2008, 02:17:44 PM »

The majority of the ELT units sold here in the USA were 121.5 and 243.0 mHz dual band, 243 being the military band.

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KE7FFX
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« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2008, 10:40:52 PM »

Lindy,
Were the auxiliary fuel tanks on the F-102A as pods under the wings, and could they be mechanically released in flight? Is there any source of literature on this?  I have more questions as I think of them.  Do you have any networking with former pilots of that model?  

73
John KE7FFX
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KH6TX
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« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2008, 09:51:54 PM »

from my USAF days (and foggy memories), believe the primary rescue radio (not a beacon as such)in the early 60's was the dual-channel AN/URC-64, rock-bound to 121.5 and 243.0; unit had extendable dipole antenna (extended full length for VHF, shortened for UHF) plus a separate cable-connected battery. Can't recall the nomenclature and details on the next one that was a combo HT and battery (URC 74?) The URC-64 had a matching vest which predated the later survival vests introduced dueing the Vietnam war - balanced the load of radio plus battery; otherwise, it was packed into the seat-mounted survival kit for fighter aircraft. International Orange/Dayglo flight suits were usually restricted to Air Defense Command (ADC) aircrew members, Air Rescue (ARS)crew members and Alaska Air Command (AAC)crews- ostensibly, these high(er) visibility suits (and reversible flight jackets with orange linings) would enhance search, rescue and recovery.

Frank Nollette, CMSgt, USAF, Ret'd
KH6TX/7
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