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Author Topic: SCAMS  (Read 972 times)
KB7XU
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Posts: 8




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« on: August 28, 2008, 09:32:26 AM »

I got an email this morning from  "Betty Frasure" <betty_frasure@yahoo.com who was inquiring about a D-Star handie talkie I have for sale.  "Betty" wanted to know the ususal stuff and wanted me to send pictures.

I replied, and sent pictures but I had a couple of questions of my own.  Was she a ham and on which web site did she see my ad?

I got a reply saying "Betty" wanted personal contact information.  She said she lived in Houston but was traveling in Canada but the secretary would send me a "certified check" and that I should cash it and deduct the price of the HT and shipping and to forward the remaining funds to the "shipping company."

"Betty" ignored my simple questions.

I emailed her back with the following reply in red:  "Betty," I will not sell to you.  I have not heard back from "Betty."

So, beware of "Betty" since this just reeks of a scam!
73, Max, KB7XU
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AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12983




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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2008, 10:13:35 AM »

And you can bet that your "excess funds" check gets cashed before the "certified check" you received bounces and your bank backs the funds out of your account. That's an e-mail scam that has bitten many people. Any time someone wants part of their payment refunded run the other direction.

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W7ETA
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Posts: 2527




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« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2008, 07:27:26 PM »

Take the check; next time someone you to send them funds so that they can send you money left to you by a distant relative, send them the check.
73
Bob
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N4CQR
Member

Posts: 567




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« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2008, 08:20:58 AM »

QUOTE "I emailed her back....."


Not a good idea. You just comfirmed your email address for the scammer!
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20635




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« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2008, 08:11:03 PM »

Almost every time I've ever advertised any ham gear for sale on the internet I get these kind of replies.

They seem automatically generated.  They often ask to please send complete description, photographs, etc of the gear for sale even though all information was contained in the original ad.  Many are traceable to sources out of the country.

Ignore-delete-ignore-delete-ignore-delete...

WB2WIK/6
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WY3X
Member

Posts: 768




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« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2008, 10:40:36 AM »

Have some fun with them. Reverse-scam them. Make them use their money to pay postage to send you the fake certified check, then stop answering their e-mails. It's a great game and a fun time to be had for a few moments of your time. Also see this website: http://www.ebolamonkeyman.com . It's a fun website where people tell stories about their reverse-scam game of scamming the scammers. They get them to take photos of themselves standing around in a group with fish on top of their heads and pouring milk and honey on themselves, standing on top of loaves of bread, and lots of other such tomfoolery! FUNNY STUFF! -KR4WM
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AA7LV
Member

Posts: 149




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« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2009, 03:36:48 PM »

THIS SCAM IS CONTINUING!

LISTED MY EQUIPMENT AND GOT AN EMAIL RESPONSE FROM:
"ROBERTREY55@YAHOO.COM"
IN THE EMAIL HE SAID:
"I WILL SEND YOU A CASHIERS CHECK FOR $3500,SEND THE BALANCE ($1800)TO ME AND THEN MY SHIPPER WILL CONTACT YOU"

HE LISTED HIS CALL AS "GS3BSQ"

I RAN THAT CALL THROUGH THE DATABASE ON QRZ.COM:

COMES BACK TO AN AMATEUR RADIO CLUB IN SCOTLAND AND THEY STATE THAT SOMEONE HAS BEEN USING THEIR CLUB
STATION CALLSIGN TO RIP OFF HAMS

A SIMILAR SCAM HAS BEEN PULLED BY:
"WILLIAMSHERRY35@YAHOO.COM"
AND THIS MAY BE THE SAME PERSON

CASHIER'S CHECKS MAY BE COUNTERFIT
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"I SPENT all my money on radios and antennas; the rest I just WASTED!"
K5END
Member

Posts: 1309




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« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2009, 06:38:26 PM »

"Make them use their money to pay postage to send you the fake certified check, "



But you'd just verify your address, part of your personal information.

Risky?
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NY0R
Member

Posts: 8




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« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2009, 06:43:24 PM »

This type of scam is very common with internet for sale listings. I recently listed something non ham related on craigslist.org and I received a reply like the one mentioned here literally within minutes of posting the ad. Craigslist has a decent write up on what to watch for: http://www.craigslist.org/about/scams
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WB5JEO
Member

Posts: 805




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« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2009, 07:25:36 AM »

And all should know that using fake money orders is popular. The sloppier ones are easy to spot, because they often use sequential serial numbers for multiple money orders. The real ones use a more elaborate code and aren't sequentially numbered, and as crooks get better, they know that and make theirs conform. All cashiers checks, certified checks and money orders can be confirmed through the issuing bank, and anyone doing long distance commerce today should be accustomed to a waiting period for those instruments to make the complete circuit to the original bank and for any negative response to reach your bank.

As to providing your contact information so someone can send payment, you might as well provide it, if the deal seems legitimate. It is absolutely no problem obtaining any address you've ever used for almost any purpose, as well as your drivers licenses, vehicles, telephone numbers (including cell numbers if you ever used them on some kinds of applications and records), your marriage and divorce records, professional licenses, property, voter registration, and criminal records, including traffic tickets in states that make them part of the criminal record, your relatives, and, of course, photos of your home from the street and the air. And more sensitive information, with the right privileges. And the records routinely go back to the early 90's and sometimes back to the 70's. They are available to anyone who can put up an apparently legitimate front and is willing to pay the cost of the service.  

The point is that it's no problem at all for someone to access enough information to credibly pretend to be a business or government entity with which you do business. And it's not enough for just you to know how to protect yourself. Everyone in the house and every employee has to know. The reason these scams are so popular is that THEY WORK.
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W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




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« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2009, 02:08:33 PM »

I bet Betty is a NO-coder!
HI Hi.
73
Bob
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N3OX
Member

Posts: 8847


WWW

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« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2009, 04:02:36 PM »

"Not a good idea. You just comfirmed your email address for the scammer! "

Yep, good to be a tad paranoid about this.  Sometimes it goes overboard.

Some girl accidentally emailed me her resume, looking for someone with the same name at some unknown firm.  I really wanted to contact her but could not bear to return her email just in case "she" was some sort of extremely clever spam that stole "her" education, etc details from her public facebook info (which I found and verified by googling but still didn't quite trust).

I ended up phoning her at the cell number on the resume ;-)  Indeed, she was real, and indeed she was grateful that I called her so she could appropriately direct her resume... but without the phone number I doubt I would have contacted her.

It's worth remembering that the "best" spams & scams are generated by human beings and they may just be trying to glean info about you from you, the simplest of which is that you have a "live" email address.

73
Dan
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73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3734




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« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2009, 06:09:37 PM »

hi,

It is funny when they ask for photos when
all my ads always have photos.

A few times I told the 'buyer' that
I wanted more money, say $500 more for the item
and to send the check next day and they did !

It went into the paper shredder.

73 james
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K5CQB
Member

Posts: 223




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« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2009, 06:35:31 PM »

I too have fun with these scammers.  I spoof an email add then reply to their original email.  they send out so many that they don't keep track of their original emails.  I tie them up as long as I can then if they are still dumb enough to bite I suggest they send the checks to "Officer Byford", list my sector as my home address and demand that they overnight Fed Ex it.  I actually had someone send me two checks the other day, lol.  It cost them $40 per package;)  I think Fed Ex needs to give me some sort of commission for all the extra business.
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AC4RD
Member

Posts: 1235




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« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2009, 09:15:09 AM »

I agree that a lot of these bogus replies are auto-generated.  I posted a "Want to buy" ad on Craigslist a year ago and got a couple of emails:  "I want to buy your WTB <item> ..."   :-/
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