Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What killed Ham Radio???  (Read 9625 times)
K4DPK
Member

Posts: 1077


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #75 on: August 24, 2009, 04:23:44 PM »

Not unexpectedly, N6XXX appears to be hiding his identity.

N6XXX is listed on qrz.com as a gentleman here in GA by a different name than the one listed in the N6XXX bio on e-ham.

This thread began based on the preposterous notion that ham radio was dead.  Unbelievably, several answering posters have accepted the rediculous first premise.  

Some, N6XXX for example, have offered up even more asinine proposals to repair the non-existant problem.

I once believed Riley Hollingsworth was responsible for the reduction in the number of crazies on the ham bands.  Now, I'm thinking they just relocated to places like e-ham, to promote hare-brained ideas like these.

Phil C. Sr.
k4dpk
Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3926




Ignore
« Reply #76 on: August 28, 2009, 12:24:28 PM »

NO2A writes: "I always wanted to know why 220 mhz. never was popular."

IMHO, the main reasons were:

1) From the end of WW2 until about the 1970s or so, a lot of ham transmitters used frequency multiplication of a relatively low-frequency xtal or VFO. The output of a 2 meter rig on 144 MHz coule this be tripled to 432 MHz. (This is one reason a lot of 'weak signal' stuff on 2 meters is down the low end, but around 432 MHz on 70 cm). But 220 doesn't have an easy harmonic relationship like that.

2) When hams began to get on VHF/UHF-FM and repeaters in a big way back in the late 1960s and early 1970s, many of them did so by converting surplus land-mobile radios. 'Low-band' sets originally meant for 30-50 MHz could usually be modded to 6 meters, 'high-band' sets originally meant for 148-174 MHz could usually be modded for 2 meters, and UHF sets for 450-470 MHz could usually be modded to 440. For some sets the mod would consist of little more than buying the right crystals and realigning. Sometimes the cost of the new crystals was the biggest expense of the project!

Long after manufactured amateur VHF/UHF-FM rigs became popular, the converted land-mobile sets were still widely used for repeaters because they were rugged, cheap and designed for 100% duty-cycle 24/7 operation.

But there were no surplus land-mobile sets that could be easily converted to 220.

3) Propagation and antenna size for 220 isn't that much different than 2 meters.

4) 220 has been a target of reallocation a couple of times since the 1970s. First there was the Class E cb proposal of 1975, which would have lost us the entire band. Then came the land-mobile proposal of the late 1980s which would have lost us the entire band too, but in the end lost us 220-222. Such threats cause rigmakers to shy away from offering new products and hams from buying or building new rigs and antennas, because if they become true, the stuff becomes almost worthless.

"The arguement is that that band is only allocated to the U.S. That still doesn`t explain why it couldn`t be an alternative to crowded 2 meters."

Because 2 meters is a worldwide amateur band, there are lots of rigs available that cover it - and have been for decades. The selection on 220 is much more limited.


73 de Jim N2EY
Logged
NO2A
Member

Posts: 846




Ignore
« Reply #77 on: August 28, 2009, 04:50:45 PM »

Thanks,Jim. I knew about frequency multiplication on the h.f. bands but never thought about that for vhf/uhf bands.-Mike.
Logged
KASSY
Member

Posts: 167




Ignore
« Reply #78 on: August 31, 2009, 04:24:47 PM »

I\'m not sure but I\'m glad it came back to life before I got licensed!  The question isn\'t "what killed ham radio?" but "what resuscitated it?"  That\'s what we need to keep doing.

There\'s always activity on the bands when I turn on the HF radio.  Always.  That\'s ham radio.  Hamfests are just an adjunct, doesn\'t matter to me if they grow or shrink.  

The license gives us permission to get on the air - we\'re not operators if we don\'t do that!

- k
Logged
KG4DGF
Member

Posts: 50




Ignore
« Reply #79 on: August 31, 2009, 09:09:37 PM »

Amateur Radio is the hobby that keeps on giving.  I got my ticket in \'99, making me a ham for half of my lifetime.  I have had my on phases and my off phases, but it always has a way to drag me back.  To reach out to young people, like me, we have to show that ham radio is more then the nets on 75 meters at night.  Call CQ sometimes, get involved in something you havent tried before. There is an entire world beyond HF, some of my most rewarding contacts have been under 100 miles, mainly in microwaves but thats a different story.  Anyways to cut a long story short, we have to show the youth, and even the middle aged and over the hill crowd, that there is much much more to ham radio than meets the eye.

P.S. I was lucky enough to find out a good friend of mine has wanted to get his license for years, so it barely even took a push; if you hear KJ4NXE on the air, congratulate him.
Logged
KJ4CJV
Member

Posts: 30




Ignore
« Reply #80 on: September 01, 2009, 07:32:34 AM »

I can not believe you guys or some of you.  I see a lot of the older gentlemen putting down the younger ones or the ones that have no knowledge.  Lets all face it PEOPLE DO NOT LIKE CHANGE!!! And things are changing. TV Analog is a thing of the past and HAM radio is not that far behind. I'm speaking as far as the USA.  I dont care what age you start at who starts it but kids these days barely would go camping if they could not have their cell phone so that they can check their face book or chat to a friend, they send txt msg's back and fourth to each other all day!  Now I'm a new ham and have had a in tress in radio and other electronics for years now and I was born in 1977.  I think my age group is the last of a dying breed, as far as radio can you guess how many of my friends like the radio? NONE! I have 1 other friend here in my area who is a ham but that's it! A lot of people get licensed and fall out of the hobby, they like it for 6 months then something comes out that doesn't require them to build a antenna, get a license nor buy a 1000.00 radio just to get a quality station.  Just wait in 10 years I bet the price of a rig will have to drop because company's will be or start to close their doors or move on to bigger and better things. (Kenwood for example...) Most hams that I know are 46-60 + so lets all face it and get real and stop making excuses!!!  When they all die where do you think ham radio will be or how active then??? Only way I see things in the near feature!! USA im referring to!

Did tapes kill 8 track, did cd's kill tapes, did dvd kill vhs, beta, and the big big CD movies?? They are all changing and if you don't face the truth then its no wonder the kids are not picking up the hobby?  If i hurt some feelings then sorry I'm just speaking the truth!

JB
Logged
N5LRZ
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #81 on: September 01, 2009, 01:02:02 PM »

Re CJV....

If you will go back 10 or 12 years and get the data on the total number of Amateurs in the US and compared it to the total number of the US Population (percentage wise) I do believe that you will find that the total number of registered amateurs has always been an extremely insignificant percentage of the US Population.

Amateur Radio has always been since its licensed inception way back in the 19 teens a hobby for the very very few and not the many.
Logged
KJ4CJV
Member

Posts: 30




Ignore
« Reply #82 on: September 01, 2009, 03:12:31 PM »

Wow thats sad in a way I like to rag-chew Sad
Logged
N3OX
Member

Posts: 8847


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #83 on: September 01, 2009, 08:16:09 PM »

"Most hams that I know are 46-60 + so lets all face it and get real and stop making excuses!!! When they all die where do you think ham radio will be or how active then???"

I think hams are older guys because a lot of them START the hobby when they retire.  Like you observed, it's an expensive hobby... and requires a lot of time.

I think a lot of teenage hams get into it and get right back out when they start families or whatever.

Time passes, retirement comes, and after a few weeks of sitting around wondering what to do now instead of heading into the office every day, and they say "hey, I wonder what ham radio is like these days?"

I got my ticket in 1995 at age 15, and I'm sticking with it even in my busy life today (no kids yet though) ..

But I was lucky in that back then my uncle helped me buy a better radio than I could have bought with my savings at the time, and one of my favorite things to do has always been building antennas.  Furthermore, my parents didn't care one bit if I filled our isolated yard with ridiculous antenna contraptions.  I doubt that's typical.

Young folks who like ham radio have a lot of reasons not to stick with it... but there's nothing stopping them from coming back when they're 60 years old.

73
Dan
Logged

73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3926




Ignore
« Reply #84 on: September 02, 2009, 02:29:45 PM »

KJ4CJV writes: "I see a lot of the older gentlemen putting down the younger ones or the ones that have no knowledge."

A lot, or just some? What about the more-experienced folks who share what they know freely?

And what about those newer folks (not all, but some) who put down the old ways, or insist on being spoon-fed everything?

KJ4CJV: "Lets all face it PEOPLE DO NOT LIKE CHANGE!!!"

Not true.

People like change if it's for the better. When the sunspot numbers rise again, it will be a change, and you'll find that almost all hams will like it.

What people don't like is change that isn't for the better. Or change just for the sake of change, without any real benefits.

KJ4CJV: "TV Analog is a thing of the past and HAM radio is not that far behind."

Analog TV ended because it was legislated out of existence. Ham radio (not "HAM", it's not an acronym) isn't about to be legislated out of existence.

Fun fact: The number of US hams is growing, and has been for more than 2 years now. While we're still a few thousand short of the peak of July 2003, there are now more US hams than in May 2000 - and the numbers keep growing.

KJ4CJV: "kids these days barely would go camping if they could not have their cell phone so that they can check their face book or chat to a friend, they send txt msg's back and fourth to each other all day!"

So?

I've been a ham 42 years; I was a teenager back in the late 1960s and 1970s. In those days there were far fewer hams per capita than today. We didn't have cell phones but we had telephones.

KJ4CJV: "Now I'm a new ham and have had a in tress in radio and other electronics for years now and I was born in 1977. I think my age group is the last of a dying breed, as far as radio can you guess how many of my friends like the radio? NONE! I have 1 other friend here in my area who is a ham but that's it!"

It's always been that way.

KJ4CJV: "A lot of people get licensed and fall out of the hobby, they like it for 6 months then something comes out that doesn't require them to build a antenna, get a license nor buy a 1000.00 radio just to get a quality station."

Amateur radio is less expensive now (when you account for inflation) than at almost any time in the past. Look at what rigs used to cost - and then see what those prices equate to in today's dollars.

KJ4CJV: "Most hams that I know are 46-60 + so lets all face it and get real and stop making excuses!!! When they all die where do you think ham radio will be or how active then???"

The problem is that you think the hams you know are all the hams in the USA. They're not.

Amateur radio isn't one thing; it's a lot of different things that are somewhat related to each other. There are probably hams in your area that you don't even suspect to exist because they don't use the same bands/modes that you do, don't go to the same club meetings, etc.

KJ4CJV: "Did tapes kill 8 track, did cd's kill tapes, did dvd kill vhs, beta, and the big big CD movies??"

Those are technologies. And while you don't see many 8 tracks or Beta tapes, audio and video recording are alive and well. People still listen to music and watch TV, they just used somewhat different technologies to do it.

Same for ham radio.

KJ4CJV: "They are all changing and if you don't face the truth then its no wonder the kids are not picking up the hobby?"

When I was in high school, 40+ years ago, there were maybe a half-dozen hams out of over 5000 students in the local high school. That half-dozen was at the peak, btw.  

KJ4CJV: "If i hurt some feelings then sorry I'm just speaking the truth!"

No, your making some observations and expressing an opinion.

---

What you're missing is the real reason for the existence of ham radio.

What ham radio is really all about is radio for its own sake. As an end in itself, not as a means to other ends. The journey, not the destination.

Most people don't see the point in that, and never did. Ham radio is for those few who do.

Photography did not kill off drawing and painting. Motorboats did not kill off sailboats and rowboats. Automobiles did not kill off bicycles and walking.

There are lots of other examples, but the point is that new technologies do not always or even usually mean the end of older ways. They do, however, often mean that people do something by choice rather than necessity.

For more than 4 decades I've heard the prophets of doom saying that amateur radio was dying and would soon be gone. And yet it's now bigger and better than ever.


73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3926




Ignore
« Reply #85 on: September 02, 2009, 02:37:33 PM »

W5ESE posted these numbers sometime back:

Year US Population #Hams Hams as % of US Population
1913 97,225,000     2,000 0.002%
1914 99,111,000     5,000 0.005%
1916 101,961,000    6,000 0.006%
1921 108,538,000   10,809 0.010%
1922 110,049,000   14,179 0.013%
1930 123,202,624   19,000 0.015%
1940 132,164,569   56,000 0.042%
1950 151,325,798   87,000 0.057%
1960 179,323,175  230,000 0.128%
1970 203,211,926  263,918 0.130%
1980 226,545,805  393,353 0.174%
1990 248,709,873  502,677 0.202%
1997 267,783,607  678,733 0.253%
2000 281,421,906  682,240 0.242%
2005 296,410,404  662,600 0.224%
2006 299,291,772  657,814 0.220%
2008 303,000,000  658,648 0.217%

Currently there are more than 675,000 US hams, and the number keeps growing steadily.

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
NO2A
Member

Posts: 846




Ignore
« Reply #86 on: September 03, 2009, 03:39:30 PM »

I really wish all those who hate our hobby so much would go use their cell phones or whatever it is they like using. By the way,when you get done talking to your friends on your cell phone,and there is nobody else to talk to do you call "CQ" on your cell phone?
Logged
K4DPK
Member

Posts: 1077


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #87 on: September 03, 2009, 07:12:29 PM »

What amazes me is the number of people who didn’t question the basic premise that “ham radio is dead”.

Many of the posters began with: What killed ham radio was…..

This has to be one of the silliest threads ever seen on e-ham or anywhere else, started by someone who wasn’t satisfied with hamfest attendance and didn’t understand the effect the sunspot cycle has on the higher HF bands.

Everyone just fell in step.  Jeez.

Ham radio operators are supposed to be a minority.  At best, they are introverted tinkerers who have inquiring minds, quick to investigate how things work and sometimes explore the possibilities for using things in other than the intended way.

 They are captivated by the magic of electronic communication that doesn’t depend on infrastructure e.g. cell towers, telephone or power lines to give them that ability.  

Hams make do.  They can build a working device from the parts available.  Often, this causes them to be stereotyped as “cheap”.  We call it resourcefulness.

Ham radio is much more than just the ability to plug something into a wall outlet and connect a pre-fab antenna bought off the Internet.  It isn’t just a way to graduate to greater frequency usage by Cbers who became “licensed talkers”.  Ham radio is a progressive learning experience.  Your license is a ticket to learn.  If you don’t continue to study and put what you learn to use, you are not a ham, you’re just a Cber who got a ham license.

Phil C. Sr.
K4dpk
Logged
K4DPK
Member

Posts: 1077


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #88 on: September 03, 2009, 07:26:39 PM »

Oh,yeah, this is hilarious:

VE3NEAR said:

"I believe if licences would have been more accessible to people, there would have been more people walking around with HTs now than with cell phones.
I saw a guy few days ago in the store with a small Icom attatched to his belt clip. Everyone was looking at him as if he was going to takeover the cash register"

************

So, what you want is a lot more people walking around with Icom HTs on their belts, so more store clerks would panic and call the cops?Huh

Are you sure about all this???

Phil C. Sr.
k4dpk
Logged
VE3PLO
Member

Posts: 158




Ignore
« Reply #89 on: September 03, 2009, 08:04:19 PM »

k4dpk,

Wink maybe it is, maybe it isn't Smiley
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!