Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Radio recommendation for my tractor  (Read 1451 times)
N0TAN
Member

Posts: 6


WWW

Ignore
« on: June 28, 2016, 09:45:57 PM »

I'd like to put a radio in my tractor. It is a cabless 2015 Branson 3520H. I'll build a weather tight enclosure for the radio itself, and I can mount the head where it will also be protected. Here's what I'd like...

 - Broadcast band RX. I'd like it to be able to receive AM and FM broadcast radio stations. AM is most important, while FM is desirable.

I could just mount a cheap car stereo on it and carry an HT, but I'd like an all in one solution.

 - If it can receive FM broadcast stations I'd like it to be in stereo.
 - I'd like it to be dual-band VHF/UHF xcvr. If only single band, then VHF is a must.
 - I'll set up a set of external speakers that can be heard from a bit of a distance, so I can listen while working around the tractor 
 - I'd like it to have an interface for a headset with mic/ptt that I can wear while operating the tractor.

If anyone has any ideas of a good radio that won't break the bank, I'd love to hear about it.

Thanks!

--
Phillip (NØTAN)
Logged
K9YLI
Member

Posts: 1059




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2016, 07:44:40 AM »

First rule of driving a tractor.  You have to listen to the  music of the machine your  pulling.
I know the rythum  (spelling) of my baler and can tell if its working right with out looking.
It is also difficult to run a radio loud enough to over come the normal noise level of tractor and machines.
Just forget the whole idea. Concentrate on listening to the machines  for a change in behavior.
Logged
N0TAN
Member

Posts: 6


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2016, 05:25:22 PM »

Thanks but that's no help at all. I grew up on a 2000 acre farm and know my way around a tractor. I only have six acres and don't bale or plow or otherwise work the field. Think of this tractor as a more powerful and more useful four-wheeler and try to stick to what I asked.

Most of the time I just have the tractor near me and want it to be a mobile talk radio platform, with capabilities for the occasional rag chew or weather net.

Thanks, but try to avoid judging people's motives and just respond to the questions they ask.

I still could use some help in trying to choose a Ham Radio. To those of you who may have something constructive to offer regarding HAM RADIO, I'm all ears. :-)
« Last Edit: June 29, 2016, 05:48:15 PM by N0TAN » Logged
K0BG
Member

Posts: 10174


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: Yesterday at 05:56:20 AM »

Given the specs you posted, and little else, you're going to need one receiver and one transceiver in my opinion. While there are two dual band transceivers which will partially fill the bill, they do so at great compromise (FM and AM broadcast for example). It is sort of like having your cake and eating it too, but with no icing!
Logged

K9YLI
Member

Posts: 1059




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: Yesterday at 08:17:46 AM »

Since your original post didn't specify anything about when  , where or how you would use the tractor, and nothing about your  previous experience with tractors,  which I have, 
I think advising you to skip the whole idea was  very good advice.
Logged
N0TAN
Member

Posts: 6


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: Yesterday at 08:56:47 AM »

I didn't ask for advice on tractor usage. I asked for advice on a radio for a specific use.

Would you care to advise me on a religion while you're at it? How about what car I should buy my XYL? FWIW she needs all wheel drive and high clearance for snow.

This isn't a "proper tractor usage" forum. It's an amateur radio forum. Quit polluting my thread unless you have something constructive to say regarding HAM RADIO.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 09:09:01 AM by N0TAN » Logged
N0TAN
Member

Posts: 6


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: Yesterday at 09:12:05 AM »

Given the specs you posted, and little else, you're going to need one receiver and one transceiver in my opinion. While there are two dual band transceivers which will partially fill the bill, they do so at great compromise (FM and AM broadcast for example). It is sort of like having your cake and eating it too, but with no icing!

Thanks KØBG. I was afraid of that. My Yaesu VX-8DR does it all and is waterproof, but it's kind of expensive to leave permanently mounted to my tractor. I may create an interface for it that I can use to temporarily use it on the tractor then remove it when I'm done. 
Logged
W9IQ
Member

Posts: 399




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: Yesterday at 10:46:47 AM »

Phillip,

I operate an EROPS tractor on my ranch. I had been using earplugs during extended operation but then switched to Bluetooth sports ear buds with a mike on the pod. These cut down the ambient dB as well as the earplugs do and the BT lets me listen to my phone or radio. I can still audibly monitor my tractor and implement performance.

My TH-F6A gives me AM, FM, and all ham bands so I just added a BT pod to interface the two. The pod I bought doesn't support transmitting on the HT but I mainly listen anyway. I grab the HT when I want to talk. My phone obviously was already set with BT.

While the earbuds work even under my chainsaw helmet with earmuffs and under my welding helmet, I also bought a self contained BT speaker with internal battery for when I don't want to listen with the earbuds. Nice during a lunch or fishing break. I leave the radio in the cab and just bring out my waterproof BT speaker.

My total investment was around $60 for all of the accessories. Everything works great as long as I remember to put them all on charge at the end of the day...

- Glenn W9IQ
Logged
W9IQ
Member

Posts: 399




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: Yesterday at 11:04:48 AM »

Phillip,

I should have mentioned that I did look at this BT adapter to support transmit and receive but decided to start simpler. This unit has a lot of nice features and gets good reviews by hams:

http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/sena-sr10-bluetooth-two-way-radio-adapter


- Glenn W9IQ
Logged
KI7EST
Member

Posts: 7




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: Yesterday at 11:20:52 AM »

+1 on using a HT for this.

Quite a few of the Yaesu HTs support AF-DUAL which lets you listen to two UHF/VHF + FM/AM where the ham bands take priority. I know the FT1DR/XDR and VX-8DR both support this. Until I get the time to install a proper mobile I'm actually running a VX-8DR + Diamond NR770 on my car. I pick up all the repeaters within ~40mi or me and can reach out to the ones within ~15mi on 5W without issue. I imagine if you were to mount an antenna you could do the same(plus probably much higher than I get mine). Just have a BNC adapter so I can easily attach/remove.

The VX-8DR also supports BT for what it's worth.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 11:55:19 AM by KI7EST » Logged
N0TAN
Member

Posts: 6


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: Yesterday at 03:48:07 PM »

Thanks! All good points. I totally forgot that my VX-8DR already has bluetooth!

So, I'll now look into a mount for the VX-8DR and start figuring out how to get a 12v lighter plug wired up so I can use my cigarette lighter charger for the HT. I already have a mag-mount mobile antenna for my VX-8DR and it should plop right on top of the ROPS.

I also think I'll snag one of those cool bluetooth headsets and a weatherproof bluetooth speaker.

I'll post a pic once I get it set up.

Thanks again!     
Logged
N2XIW
Member

Posts: 17




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: Yesterday at 03:59:33 PM »

You might consider the FTM-10R if you can find one reasonably priced, especially if it has the bluetooth option.
Logged
KK4YDR
Member

Posts: 303




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: Yesterday at 09:57:20 PM »

First rule of driving a tractor.  You have to listen to the  music of the machine your  pulling.
I know the rythum  (spelling) of my baler and can tell if its working right with out looking.
It is also difficult to run a radio loud enough to over come the normal noise level of tractor and machines.
Just forget the whole idea. Concentrate on listening to the machines  for a change in behavior.


My oh my you hit the nail on the head. We have a family hay farm in Alabama. I know the instant my shear pin breaks on the fly wheel on my square baler by the thump and then free spin sound. Or the sound of when the baling twine isn't flowing properly or snaps on the round baler. And a list of other things. If I were cranking music I would never hear it. However, there is nothing wrong with listening to music while farming as long as you are aware that your senses are slightly diminished and distracted. The most important thing ever is being able to listen to the machinery behind you when that PTO is spinning and muscling about. Lots of disaster can be prevented by being aware of the sounds.

I know the OP is using his "advanced four wheeler" but we lost a neighbor once. He was just four wheeling about and when he was having fun and lifted the bucket on his front end loader it was not pinned down and it slid right down the loader arms and smashes his skull flat as a pancake. So anything can happen. Having your senses dulled makes chances of getting hurt even higher. I understand where K9YLI is coming from. So from a safety standpoint, regardless of 1 year or 100 years of driving farm equipment, is that they should never be regarded as a toy or a pickup truck cruising down the highway. These machines will literally keep chugging, spinning, turning the bush hog blades, extending hydraulic pistons, etc... after you have just rolled the thing over. And all it takes is a mistake, not paying attention, a distraction, etc... and your life is either over or you are seriously injured.

But you didn't ask for any of that. But there are other people that read these threads and it might help someone else whom didn't think of this stuff. Remember that just because you post a question, doesn't mean you are the only one that will ever read it. I have learned numerous things from reading other threads that were years old and I had nothing to do with.

My father before he passed away used to use a set of headphones that had an AM/FM radio built in with a cool rubber ducky antenna coming off of them. Very 1980's design or was it 90s?

I am unsure of anything other than a dedicated RX or HF radio that can receive AM broadcast bands? After all they are in the medium and longwave portion typically i.e. 600 and 2200meters. Not sure what AM radio you speak of that would use a VHF/UHF radio to tune into? So maybe any inexpensive rugged older model HF radio should work just fine. Just plug your headphones into the speaker and jack and jam away to your talk radio shows or evangelical hell and brim-fire screaming preacher than dominates ShortWave.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 10:12:29 PM by KK4YDR » Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!