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Author Topic: TS-480 HX Installation  (Read 3733 times)
NT6U
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« on: July 23, 2016, 01:09:14 PM »

Does it make any difference to the Kennwood TS 480 HX main unit when installed right side up or upside down.  laying flat?  There is a top and bottom.
Is heat dissipation effected?
I have mounted it in a 2016 Tacoma 4x4, access cab, on the floor on the transmission well ridge, behind front seats.  No back seats in installed. 
Thanks
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K0BG
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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2016, 01:46:11 PM »

It shouldn't as long as it has circulation all around the chassis.
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NT6U
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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2016, 06:12:01 PM »

Thank you.
I also appreciate your website.
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W8JX
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« Reply #3 on: Today at 05:47:07 AM »

It shouldn't as long as it has circulation all around the chassis.

I disagree. Bad advise because K0BG does not always think things thru as usual. This is a 200 watt rig in a car that can get warm at times so you want best possible cooling. This rig has a natural flow path thru it and uses fans to augment it. That path is drawing air thru front and bottom over main circuitry and then out over finals and out back. I ideally it would be best to installing it vertically face down as this is the flow path of fan cooling and it would would aid cooling when fans are off and assist its cooling quicker when power is off. (heat rises and it would use normal path) Second choice would be to mount it flat top side up. To mount it flat upside down places heat sink below rig and would tend to heat circuit up above it from convection as heat rises. Mounting it vertically fan down would be last choice choice because this would not only reduce cooling efficiency (because heat tends to rise) and when fan is off heat flow path would reverse and heat from heat-sink would rise into main circuitry in rig and heat it more than normal and this would result in larger temp swing there as fan cycles on and off. Also, air expands as it heat so air displaces a greater volume when heated and exit holes by fan are bigger than entrance surface area to assist flow. When flow it reverse, the expanded heated air flow is choked by smaller entrance holes now being used as exits.
« Last Edit: Today at 06:47:56 AM by W8JX » Logged

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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20 WPM Extra
K0BG
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« Reply #4 on: Today at 07:50:50 AM »

Well, the fire is calling the kettle black. The manual say not to mount the transceiver vertically! I wonder why?
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W8JX
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« Reply #5 on: Today at 08:06:57 AM »

Well, the fire is calling the kettle black. The manual say not to mount the transceiver vertically! I wonder why?

I own a 480 do you??? I have also had mine apart to study its design and add accessories to it have you?  I suspect recommendation is because someone would mount it vertically face up, which you do not do for reasons I mentioned and you must of missed.  So, rather than try to confuse users, like you,  between which way a vertical mount is okay they do not recommend it at all because mounted vertically face up would reduce cooling.

BTW how are your 3/4 wave 440 verticals doing that you said would work great when they do not?
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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20 WPM Extra
AG5BC
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« Reply #6 on: Today at 09:48:20 AM »

I agree with K0BG. Mounting it vertically gives them a far better chance of shaking something apart in a mobile installation, especially with the centrally located mounting bracket and the large mass of the radio. Mounting it pointed down (or up) would be worse than across because the bracket makes a great pivot point for shaking the rig.

Kenwood has done the thermal modeling as well. If they say to mount it flat, it's probably safe to say that they don't think any perceived cooling advantages that come from vertical mounting outweigh the mechanical disadvantages.

And before you retort about all of your TS-480 experience, you should know that I own a TS-480SAT, which has internal relays for its tuner that probably don't like extra movement, either.

I think that I'd follow the manufacturer's advice on this one - unless, of course, you've managed to design and manufacture your own HF rig and successfully market it without our knowledge. If you have, please let us know - people might like to hear about that.


Brian
AG5BC
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K0BG
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« Reply #7 on: Today at 11:30:50 AM »

I have owned a TS-480Hx, and used it long enough to learn more about it than you apparently have, John.

In any case, it would serve you better not to be so abrasive and indigent.
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