Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Noise in RV installation  (Read 363 times)
WB2LOU
Member

Posts: 11




Ignore
« on: March 24, 2005, 10:43:47 AM »

I recently installed a ICOM 706 and screwdriver antenna set up in my motorhome. For the most part operation has been great and I have made many DX contacts. I only operate when stationary and run on the 12 volt house battery system for power.

However, the operation is hampered by S-5 electrical noise most of the time. Yesterday I unplugged the AC 120 volt line and the noise went away and I heard stations that were buried in the noise. While this is fine for me, it is not for the XYL who wants her TV, microwave oven, etc..

Has anyone had this problem and found a way to isolate the batteries from the AC power converter/charger without running a seperate 12 volt line?
Logged
K0BG
Member

Posts: 9868


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2005, 11:14:19 AM »

Actually, it probably "IS" the battery charger and/or isolator circuitry causing you the problem. Running a separate power feed to the radio most likely will not solve it.

RV and trailer makers are not known for using topnotch components in their standard models. You have a couple of choices. First, you could replace the charger with a more robust one and hope that it is better filtered. However, the selling price has little to do with how much and how well the unit performs in the real world.

Assuming a multi-battery setup, if the charger runs through an isolator (most single ended ones do), the isolator may be causing some of the noise, if not all. After all, they are diodes, they get leaky, etc.

It's a big pain, but I'd go looking for the source with a potable AM radio. If you have a VHF radio with an AM mode, that's better yet. Obviously, knowing the source is 90% of the battle.

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!