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Author Topic: 1969 Chevy C-10 & Icom 706 MK II  (Read 452 times)
N0TJO
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Posts: 23




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« on: October 19, 2007, 06:26:52 PM »

Installed Icom 706 into 1969 C-10 (All american steel) Routed power pos lead to bat and neg lead to bat lead ground connection on motor. Radio is grounded to frame and mounted directly to underside of steel dash. Antenna is bumper mounted and grounded properly. As a test I only had a 20 amp and 10 amp fuse in power leads. The neg lead had the 10 amp and blew but the radio stayed on. Did I create a ground loop somehow or is radio at fault with possible broke ground stud internally? Incidentally swr was perfect. The truck is in exc cond with wood bed. Most part original reconditioned shape. Thanks for any info N0TJO/Brian
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K0BG
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« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2007, 04:59:17 AM »

Yes you did. When you turn the key to start the engine, there is an inrush of several hundred amps. This causes a voltage drop across the ground wire to the engine, and across your radio's ground. Enough in fact, to blow the negative lead fuse.

The negative lead should go directly  to the battery, or to the frame point where the accessory ground is connected. The fact the radio's chassis is grounded, is coincidental.

If you want the whole story, read my Wiring article on my web site.

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
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K0BG
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« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2007, 08:50:57 AM »

I tried sending you a reply to your question, but Yahoo returned it. Here it is:

With respect to the Icom IC-706, the negative lead is connected internally to the case of the radio through several circuit board traces, and three clip-on heat sinks which contact the outer case.

Remember, there are two negative, and two positive connections on the battery. This subject is covered in my Wiring and Alternator article on my web site.

Here is the scenario as best as I can explain it with out a schematic: The BIG negative lead from the battery goes to the engine block, close to the starter motor. The BIG positive goes to the starter relay/solenoid. When you start the engine there is a voltage drop across these leads. In cold weather, it is not uncommon for the voltage drop to be 2 or 3 volts. Remember, the inrush to the starter motor can be as high as 800 amps, and in some cases (shunt style starter motors), 1,200 amps!

When you connect the negative lead of your radio to the engine block, it had the potential of what ever the voltage is at that point on the engine block where it is attached. The frame of the radio is at a different potential. How much difference depends on resistance of the conductors, both in an out of the radio, the chassis resistance, the SMALL (accessory) negative lead (battery), and even the resistance of the fuse.

When you start the engine, the effect is to express a voltage across the negative lead of you radio's power wiring. As a result, the fuse in this negative lead had 2 or 3 volts expressed up on it. Since the resistance in this lead is about .2 ohms give or take, enough current flows through the lead to blow the fuse.

The radio still operates, because it is getting is negative return through the various chassis connections. Which, incidentally, isn't a wise thing to have happen! If you were to transmit in this fashion, there is a possibility to burn those aforementioned traces, and/or the heat sinks.

There are two schools of though on connecting the leads directly to the battery, or to the chassis point when the accessory ground attaches. The reason is, amateur radios chassises are NOT isolated, but commercial radios chassises are.

What I'm puzzled over is, why did you use a 10 amp fuse in the negative lead?

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2007, 11:55:34 AM »

>>What I'm puzzled over is, why did you use a 10 amp fuse in the negative lead?>>

You and me both.  

I would *expect* a 10A fuse to blow when placed in a 20A line as soon as the standard current requirements for the radio on xmit were demanded!


KE3WD
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N0TJO
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« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2007, 04:44:56 PM »

My concern wasnt with the 10 amp fuse. The fuse was all I had available at the time for a test. It now has the proper fuse installed. My question was really centered around the fact that the radio stayed on even after the fuse was removed? Is this normal? If so I would think it would negate the need of the fuse on the negative lead in the first place. Please explain if you can. Thanks.
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