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Author Topic: reasons some clubs fail.  (Read 51403 times)
WD8DK
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Posts: 48




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« Reply #30 on: March 04, 2017, 01:56:37 AM »

Yes many clubs have boring meetings and do not draw the younger people in. A lot of times you will find that in any club 10% of the club will end up doing 90% of the work, be it a hamfest, FD, bike race or whatever. Most would rather sit and socialize at the meetings.

People have other interests and a lot of them have families whose school age activities take up a lot of time. Those who are still able to work don't have the time to commit to club activities. So the retirees are usually the ones who end up doing the work.

How do you get the older generation to embrace the technology that drives the young generation? If a club wants to get more younger members then it has to keep abreast of the latest advances. If an older ham buys an IC-7300 or even IC-7610 they set the radio up with the use of a computer and then don't learn the different features. If a younger ham buys the same radio and needs help they get the "deer in the headlights" look when they ask another member for help. So the new ham or new member stops attending the meetings because all they see are a bunch of old men socializing about their medical ailments or they claim they're too busy being retired.

No matter what a club's interest is, being radio, trains, quilting or whatever that club will be hard pressed to attract new blood because of the myriad of activities and obligations that a person of the younger generation has.

Exactly! A club of 40 is lucky to get 10 at a meeting. We have done everything from Field Day, Street Fair raffles and more to get the club's name out. We operate one of the better repeaters in the area. Still it is the same handful of people who come to meetings, serve as officials. It's a shame, as there are over 100 licensed hams within a 10 mile radius.
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3387




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« Reply #31 on: March 04, 2017, 06:07:16 PM »

Yes many clubs have boring meetings and do not draw the younger people in. A lot of times you will find that in any club 10% of the club will end up doing 90% of the work, be it a hamfest, FD, bike race or whatever. Most would rather sit and socialize at the meetings.

People have other interests and a lot of them have families whose school age activities take up a lot of time. Those who are still able to work don't have the time to commit to club activities. So the retirees are usually the ones who end up doing the work.

How do you get the older generation to embrace the technology that drives the young generation? If a club wants to get more younger members then it has to keep abreast of the latest advances. If an older ham buys an IC-7300 or even IC-7610 they set the radio up with the use of a computer and then don't learn the different features. If a younger ham buys the same radio and needs help they get the "deer in the headlights" look when they ask another member for help. So the new ham or new member stops attending the meetings because all they see are a bunch of old men socializing about their medical ailments or they claim they're too busy being retired.

No matter what a club's interest is, being radio, trains, quilting or whatever that club will be hard pressed to attract new blood because of the myriad of activities and obligations that a person of the younger generation has.

Exactly! A club of 40 is lucky to get 10 at a meeting. We have done everything from Field Day, Street Fair raffles and more to get the club's name out. We operate one of the better repeaters in the area. Still it is the same handful of people who come to meetings, serve as officials. It's a shame, as there are over 100 licensed hams within a 10 mile radius.
   Interesting.  Do you know how many of those local hams in the area are active?  I've been to areas where a substantial number of hams are listed, but it seems that only a small number of them are actually still on the air.
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W1XWX
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Posts: 56


WWW

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« Reply #32 on: June 15, 2017, 08:41:39 AM »

In my area there are only 2-3 clubs that actually DO anything other than bicycle races. Smiley

Yes most of them hold a weekly net and a monthly meeting --- but that's about it. Others are stuck-on EMCOM only. 73
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Life's too short for QRP
KC4ZGP
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Posts: 529




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« Reply #33 on: June 15, 2017, 11:57:15 AM »


Hero worship of the ARRL is the main cause.

But the league says...

And the league means...

_ _ ... ... _ _

Kraus
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K1HMS
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Posts: 360




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« Reply #34 on: Yesterday at 10:02:36 PM »


Hero worship of the ARRL is the main cause.

But the league says...

And the league means...

_ _ ... ... _ _

Kraus

Kraus

Some of your post clearly shows you have real knowledge of radio and antennas, many are just trying to be funny but are flippant/annoying QRM on the threads, but "Hero worship of the ARRL is the main cause" given the question is "why clubs fail" I don't get. What does the ARRL have to do with whether a club is healthy and growing, or not?

We are a growing club (N1FD) due to "project nights", offering license and CW classes, hosting VE testing sessions, mentoring, having members write articles for a monthly news letter and much more. As Fred (AB1OC) writes above in this thread we reach out to the young to encourage STEM interests. The most recent was a high altitude balloon launch  (it went over 90,000 feet and crossed 3 state lines) with various sensors, APRS and GPS for live tracking, and a Go-Pro camera link. Local HS students participated.  None of these activities start or stop because there is a ARRL. ARRL is not the cause of clubs failing, or succeeding.

Now if the ARRL didn't exist it is likely Ham radio wouldn't continue to exist.

Spectrum is valuable real estate worth taking, making products RFI free costs money, and the thought of amateurs modifying/building non-type accepted equipment in non-channelized spectrum with ERIPs over 15kW scares a lot of people due to the potential impact to public safety and FAA comms, and the HOA lobby would be more than glad to see Hams put 10' under. Now throw in the concern over the preppers having a independent distributed comm solution without a single switch to turn it off.

There are a dozen organizations that have tried, and will keep trying to put pressure on the congresscritters to cut our coax for good.

We need guys in suits to put counter pressure on the congresscritters to keep the bands open. Guys that know their way around the Rayburn Building that have enough jingle in their pockets to live anywhere near Wash DC and cover a nice lunch for discussions with the congresscritters' staffers so they know our side of why Ham radio is important and the ability to sound the alarm to the Ham community if a threat appears. Those guys are the ARRL. 

We just wrapped up the ARRL field day with 3 towers and 4 beams, wire Vs, and a 3 el wire V beam array with 3 50' masts, 7 transmitters going the full 24 hours.  (I could have used you on CW). We put it up on a soccer field Friday and took it all down Sunday.  We got additional points by inviting State reps, the governor and congresscritters. It's a ARRL effort to counter weight the efforts of those making the case to pull our plug.

Unlike big pharma the Ham related industry isn't large enough to do the job, and if Hams went it alone what would that look like? If Hams showed up on the Washington Mall to protest it's likely they would be out numbered by tourist and other disorganized protesters by 4 to 1 on a typical day, and they wouldn't be noticed. Beside most Hams would never spend the money on a airline ticket.

Is ARRL perfect? No, far from it, I could write pages on the issues I believe they have wrong. But as a member I, and 170k other members, have a voice to try and fix it. If they stray too far we'll stop sending money and they will need new jobs.  QST is almost worth the $10/month to join.

Does ARRL always get what they want, no. They tried and couldn't stop the US Dept of Commerce from letting in non type approved LED noise generators light bulbs because it would irritate China. But look at it this way, ARRL only has 170k members, which isn't a position of strength.  AARP has 37 million members and nearly $1B/yr, and they don't always get what they want either.

73

K1HMS
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