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Author Topic: Disapointed in local clubs so far  (Read 5792 times)
VE3ES
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Posts: 9




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« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2008, 05:12:14 AM »

Whine, whine, whine.  Get over it.  Join a club and get involved.  A few months down the road you'll be one of the main shooters and players.  Go to your local service club, stamp club, model railroad club, etc, etc, etc.  Same story.  This is life.  Again, get over it.  Move on.  Get your Extra class ticket, learn code, get DX'ing, contesting, experimenting, building, stay off of the wasteland called 2m FM, et.al.  Clubs are not a waste of time but simply a reflection of the amount of time and effort that YOU put into them.  CQ DX...  Think Dayton!
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KC4RSL
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #16 on: March 28, 2008, 12:00:14 PM »

There are good clubs out there and I hope you can find one.  As has been said a couple of times, the members ARE the clubs so you can influence things by your own actions.  A hard road, but sometimes worth it.

My main point is about your plans to upgrade so you can get on HF....you have HF privileges NOW.  You have CW rights on 80, 40 and 15 meters as well as the CW, DATA and SSB rights on 10 meters.  If you're thinking about giving CW a try, DO IT!  General class will give you more frequencies and bands, but you don't have to wait to jump in.

73 and hope to meet you on air,
Doug/ KC4RSL
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KJ4CNN
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Posts: 11




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« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2008, 08:50:37 PM »

Sorry to hear about your less than friendly experience with the two clubs in your area.  There are ways to break the ice and the best suggestion is to get involved and to take the initiative to talk to the members.  Amateur radio clubs are no different than any other social gathering.  There are those who posture and those who are friendly and those who just don't give a darn.

It's not every club that has gregarious people who naturally approach strangers.  It's as hard for them as it may be for you!

And yes, there are those who want to impress you immediately with what they have, what they do and how they do it in amateur radio.  When I run across these folks I politely listen even if they're just blustering.    If they're really advanced (and they're just bragging about it) they can be a lot of help to me.  I listen to them and they become a valuable resource to me.

HF is the way to go although in my area (Northern Virginia) the 2 meter and 70 cm repeaters are not the new CB radio bands that a previous poster mentioned ... maybe in other areas of the country but not here.

Getting back to the original poster's situation, if there are only 2 clubs and clubbing is desired, don't give up.  Go back and break the ice.

Good luck!

73

KJ4CNN Ray
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W5ESE
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Posts: 550


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« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2008, 01:28:12 PM »

> although in my area (Northern Virginia) the 2 meter
> and 70 cm repeaters are not the new CB radio bands
> that a previous poster mentioned ... maybe in other
> areas of the country but not here.

It's the same here. 2m and 70cm are fine in central
Texas.

Scott
W5ESE


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KD4LLA
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Posts: 455




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« Reply #19 on: May 29, 2008, 08:07:59 PM »

I have been in three Ham clubs.  Two do not exist anymore--they just died for lack of interest.  It was fun while it lasted!  Could be the Internet took over has the big club, I do not know.  I do know a few local Hams and talk with them once in awhile.  Any club (Ham, garden, civic group) is pretty much the same, it takes time to find a niche.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6012




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« Reply #20 on: February 22, 2009, 08:06:39 AM »

You aren't alone--not at all.  I belonged to two clubs, volunteered to do the work nobody else wanted to do, made friends, got elected to club office and all the rest.  Got to the point I tried to do what was best to advance the club and get more participation--and was regularly kicked back by the member/s who thought they 'owned' the club and would dictate what they wanted.

Bottom line?  If you want to join a club, be prepared to be dictated to and led around.  If not, your participation won't count for beans--and you'll get shoe prints on your backside.
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N7ZM
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Posts: 131




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« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2009, 05:06:27 PM »

Be glad you have a local club too join. I live in the Capitol City of Nevada, Carson City, which has no local club at all. One has to travel to Lake Tahoe, Reno, or Minden for such activities. Could not understand why one was never started here as there are enough hams, but not enough wanting to join together as a radio club, weird.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6012




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« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2009, 04:21:35 AM »

I know what you're speaking of--but remember that a club is a group of people who come together for persuit of a general interest of a subject.  The specific ways of pursuing that subject are, however, as numerous as the the number of members of that club, and are becoming more numerous every day.

Clubs are going under because repeaters--the one major reason clubs have stayed together for so long--are being superceded by the marriage of the internet and ham radio.

They're becoming as outmoded as local communications with HF frequencies did when VHF and FM became widely available.  There is just too many options available in ham radio today--with the result being more different ways club members can differ on how to get things done.  

That is the main reason clubs are dying off--and the  reason they are becoming more focused, which alienates members and accelerates the results--the death of those clubs.
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N2UGB
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Posts: 179




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« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2009, 04:55:15 AM »

I agree with your comments. The days of amateur radio clubs being all things to all people are numbered.

However clubs that are focused with a fixed objective appealing to individual niches within the hobby can survive and prosper.

For example, QRP clubs do well. And QRP clubs with a membership that gets outdoors and participates in  
QRP/portable operating activities and events, some of an international nature, do very well.

That may be, and could be, the case for other specialized radio clubs.

73
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JLEVERIN
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Posts: 11




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« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2009, 08:18:30 PM »


  Sorry you had a bad experience. I just went to my first meeting of the Pueblo Ham Club and was very pleased. I was a bit skiddish to be begin with because I was afraid I might be the only female there. Suprisingly, there were two other women there and they went out of their way to make me feel welcome. The men were a mixed bag, some were kind of stand offish but a couple did walk up and introduce themselves and were very nice. They gave me a couple of copies of their lastest newsletters and a copy of the local repeaters and one of the ladies gave me her email address and clued me in on the clubs upcoming events. The meeting was pretty formal with them following strict meeting rules but overall it was a good experience. I will certainly try to go back next month. I am not normally a really extroverted person either.
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JLEVERIN
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Posts: 11




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« Reply #25 on: April 21, 2009, 06:08:11 AM »


  I even heard that said of churches, where someone visited and the people were "either friendly or "cliqish". We tend to gravitate to people like us that we know....
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K9FON
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Posts: 1012




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« Reply #26 on: May 21, 2009, 09:18:00 AM »

I am a board member of our local grass roots ham club the "Northeast Indiana Amateur Radio Club" and we try to welcome new members. Heck, i even try to get some of the local hams that are no longer active but still have a call to come to our meetings. So far, i have gotten a couple active on the air again after a long lapse.
There is a club in Fort Wayne that has meetings once a month on a Friday night that i was invited to once.
I went to 2 meetings and i have not been back. As soon as they found out that i was a board member of another radio club i was pretty much shunned.  
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NB3K
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Posts: 8




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« Reply #27 on: December 05, 2009, 02:19:43 AM »

Don't feel bad. I used to belong to the Susquehanna Valley ARC (W3VPJ) in Selinsgrove, Pa. I was having a bad year back in 2007 and got into trouble with the law. The club decided to kick me while I was serving 30 days in the county jail. They didn't even have the balls to confront me personally. When I wrote back and made a complant using their roberts rules, I get ignored. I tried to arrange pick up of my tower sections, which they stole anyhow "they ended up being sunk in concrete.)When I was in the club, there was nothing but discontent. No one cared about ham radio. It was politics and talking behind peoples' back. Come to find out they never liked me in the first place. But who cares. Now I have two of the clubs idiots monitoring my on-the-air activities because they didn't like the way   I talked. Their A.R.E.S group disbanded which isn't a surprise. They were very disorganized and self centered people. Since I have been out of the club, I have been a happier person. I feel for the folks that are in the club that really want to make something of it and have the idiot's ruining it for them.
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KL7AJ
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Posts: 329


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« Reply #28 on: December 27, 2009, 10:07:48 AM »

I have a whole chapter in the Opus of Amateur Radio Knowledge and Lore about starting and/or finding a radio club.

The worst thing that happened to the general purpose radio club was the 2-meter repeater.  When the entire resources of a club are absorbed in keeping a repeater afloat, it's no wonder "kids" don't stick around.  You need to find a club that's NOT centered around a repeater.   We have 12 PRACTICALLY UNUSED microwave bands, that are wide open frontiers for experimentation.  THIS is what kids want!   I KNOW, because I actually ASK them.

I've been in ARES, RACES and MARS for an accumulated time of nearly 75 years. (Concurrent sentences...HI!)   That being said, I've never run across a single ham under the age of 25 who could give a rat's patoot about EMCOMM.   This is verifiable.  ASK THEM!!!!

Find or start a club that's centered on AMATEUR.....the LOVE of radio.   This is what's going to keep the YOUTH in the hobby.


Eric
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