Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Mod questions  (Read 1331 times)
2ST123
Member

Posts: 56




Ignore
« on: February 09, 2007, 08:52:02 AM »

We are just getting into ham radio and leaving regular c.b. . I know modifications are illegal for c.b. , but what kind of mods can you legally do for ham radios as a technician class ? Can you make channel expantion modifications? Power modifications? and other mods?
My wife did a little work on generators in the military, Maby she can learn modifications.. Thanks

                              Roy

Logged
K8AC
Member

Posts: 1478




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2007, 10:13:01 AM »

Roy:  You may do any modifications that you're capable of doing, regardless of license class.  Of course, the results of your modifications should be respectful of the frequency assignments and power limitations.   The ham bands are not subdivided into "channels", although you'll find fixed frequency operation on the bands where there is repeater operation (2 meters, 440, etc.).  

One of the differences you'll find in Ham radio compared to CB is that the vast majority of hams follow the regulations pertaining to power output and assigned frequencies.  

Modern ham gear usually has all the bells and whistles that one could want and modifications are usually limited to installing filters.  Those who participate in MARS have a need to be able to operate on specific frequencies just outside of the some of the amateur bands and modifications are often available to effect such operation.  Unless you have plans for MARS operation, modifications to allow you to operate outside of the amateur bands could lead to more trouble than you want!

Logged
K8GU
Member

Posts: 719


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2007, 10:23:19 AM »

It's technically legal to make whatever modifications you wish.  However, the modification may make it illegal to operate the radio.  For instance, few, if any, amateur transceivers are type-accepted for use in services outside the amateur bands, EVEN IF YOU ARE LICENSED FOR THEM.  

There are a few legitimate modifications that actually improve the performance of radios with little or no detriment to the proper operation.  (Two examples are W8JI's noise blanker and key click modifications to the FT-1000* radios.) But, this is generally the exception...
Logged
WA9SVD
Member

Posts: 2198




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2007, 05:16:37 PM »

It's not a maytter of "MAY."  
    NO current (or past) AMATEUR equipmenthas ever been certified for operation outside the Amateur frequency allocations, nor is any likely in the forseeable future.
    Any radio may be modified for use on the Amateur bands, be it commercial, or CB equipment.  But once modified in any way that affects the transmit chain, (either RF or audio) that radio can no longer be used in it's original service; it's no longer certified.
    In addition, any equipment modified by an Amateur still has to meet the FCC standards for spectral purity.

    It IS possible that some commercial equipment can be PROGRAMMED to operate on some Amateur frequencies, as well as the original commercial frequencies.  THAT would be perfectly legal, and would normally preserve the certification for use in the original service.
Logged
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2007, 06:38:55 PM »

I get concerned when folks who do not yet have an amateur radio license start asking question about modifying equipment, especially when they start talking about frequency expansions.

Other than Military Affiliate Radio System (which requires a separate license issued by one of the three MARS services) there is no legal reason to modify the frequency range of amateur radios.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Baltimore, Maryland
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
KB5DPE
Member

Posts: 298




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2007, 06:48:03 PM »

"Other than Military Affiliate Radio System (which requires a separate license issued by one of the three MARS services) there is no legal reason to modify the frequency range of amateur radios"

I can think of one.  There are some earlier radios that meet stability and other requirements that can be modified to operate on the 60M band.  My FT-990 with TCXO is one example.  I agree, however, that caution is in order.  You also need a suitable frequency standard to assure that that TCXO is properly set and a spectrum analyzer wouldn't hurt to assure spectral purity as well.  You wouldn't rebuild a race car engine without a properly equipped machine shop available; similarly, you can't modify a ham transmitter without the proper test equipment to assure the results.
Logged
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2007, 07:00:27 AM »

<< I can think of one. There are some earlier radios that meet stability and other requirements that can be modified to operate on the 60M band.>>

That is not operation outside the amateur bands.

Lon W3LK
Baltimore, Maryland
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3734




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2007, 05:15:52 PM »

hi roy,

take a look at this link, it shows frequencies available based on license class and
the power levels allowed.

http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/allocate.html

plenty of room to explore many different types of
communications, cw (morse code), ssb, fm and am voice, digital modes etc.

take a look here to find a local radio club in your area,
many welcome those interested in getting their license and offer classes to help.

http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/club/clubsearch.phtml

73 james ke4drn
Logged
KE5FRF
Member

Posts: 12




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2007, 08:49:25 PM »

//We are just getting into ham radio and leaving regular c.b.//

Doesn't this statement trouble anyone else?

How do you leave "regular CB"? IS there another kind of CB that you wouldn't be leaving when you leave the regular one?

Oh, I know, you're leaving regular CB but not freeband CB, and you want to get a ham license to learn how to trick out a ham radio to make it go where you want.

I see now.

Gawd.
Logged
W9GB
Member

Posts: 2659




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2007, 08:31:23 AM »

Roy -

The FCC rules and regulations are codified in Title 47 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). They are initially published in the Federal Register.
The FCC does not maintain a database of its rules nor does it print or stock copies of the rules and regulations. That task is performed by the Government Printing Office (GPO).

Code of Federal Regulations - Title 47 [Telecommunications]
http://wireless.fcc.gov/rules.html

Part 95 - Personal Radio Service
Citizens Band is one of the services covered under these rules and regulations.
http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_06/47cfr95_06.html

Part 97 - Amateur Radio Service
http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_06/47cfr97_06.html

w9gb
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!