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Author Topic: license to qrp  (Read 4411 times)
WZ7W
Member

Posts: 14




Ignore
« on: April 27, 2000, 12:32:07 PM »

I took easy CW tests, if you call 20WPM multiple choice
easy.  And I took easy written tests after using the
question pool to make practice tests.  So I've been a
ham 3 years now, a VE almost a year, and I've got an
opinion on the education one gets to get a license.

I think I've learned alot more operating QRP than
studying to upgrade.  I think it would be a great place for
people to start out.  They will have their antennas and
transmission line bugs worked out if they're going to
have any success.  Speaking of success I'm thinking
they would know how to use the bands if they got a
multiband rig,  and it would be kind of hard not to notice
the advantages of code, if you weren't allowed 200W
right of the bat.  So I am sorry for the QRO lids, (I'm not
saying QRO=lid) but people who are both don't know
what they're missing.
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K0RS
Member

Posts: 778




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2000, 07:25:34 AM »

Sounds like a perscription for disaster to me.  Expecting newcomers with little or no experience to be skillful enough to be deal with QRP is a recipe for disappointment.  Once one builds basic operating skills first. Should they gravitate later to QRP then fine, but it's a lousy way to start out.  Not everyone is lucky enough to have someone elmer them thru the problems and build an effective QRP station at the outset.  Nothing like a little early success to maintain interest.  I think a "normal" 100w rig is the best way to assure that.  We don't need to run people off with our personal likes, dislikes and predjudices.  
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N6QTH
Member

Posts: 42




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« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2000, 11:00:40 PM »

Well, I started with a homebrew 10 watter....  and an old Hallicrafter military surplus receiver.  That forced me to focus on good antenna design/construction.  Graduated to a HW-16 about six months later and progressed on from there.  I tend to agree that newcomers need to keep the power down and work for the best performance with the least input, but I'm not sure QRP (in it's purest form) offers quite enough promise of success to keep the interest up in some of the newcomers.  
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K0RS
Member

Posts: 778




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2000, 04:23:27 AM »

Nothin' like a fake call...the FCC doesn't issue callsigns that contain "Q" signals.
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KL7IPV
Member

Posts: 984




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« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2001, 02:56:31 PM »

Yup - no database lists N6QTH as valid.. Must be April Fool's joke.
73,
Frank
Kl7IPV
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KL7IPV
Member

Posts: 984




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2001, 02:56:49 PM »

Yup - no database lists N6QTH as valid.. Must be April Fool's joke.
73,
Frank
KL7IPV
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W5HTW
Member

Posts: 729


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2001, 09:25:18 PM »

Wow!  Deja vu all over again!  

Let's see, how about a "learner's permit" in ham radio?  With, let's say, restricted bands?  And how about reduced power?  And what about limited modes to enable them to practice, learn operating procedures, and kind of "get up to speed?"  

Oh?  We did that already?  The Novice license?  Well, maybe the old timers had a couple of good ideas after all!  

Nothing like a brand new ham, licensed yesterday, for the first time ever, with an Extra Class ticket and 1500 watts (plus)  on 20 meters.  

Like taking your kid to the motor vehicle bureau for his first license and letting him drive off in a 400 HP Corvette at rush hour.  

OK, in all seriousness, the Novice ticket was exactly this - a 'beginner's' license, a chance to learn what the hobby was about, how to operate, how to conduct a QSO, get acquainted with radio safety, tuning, capabilities, etc., and even to learn "if this is really what I like to do."  

Ah, well --- infinite wisdom.

73
Ed W5HTW
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