Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Gel Cell Batteries  (Read 3418 times)
KG6GTH
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« on: November 27, 2001, 12:29:45 AM »

I hope someone can help. I would like to purchase a gel cell battery. A 17amp Hr is what I read recently on this Web Site. How long will this last by using an HT and a Mobile Rig?

I am a fairley new Ham and would appreciate some advice.


Thanks  73's
Sean KG6GTH
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20547




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2001, 05:14:26 PM »

Depends on the "mobile rig."  There are 5W mobile rigs, and 100W mobile rigs...

A 17AH gel cell will not power a 100W mobile rig for any length of time, insufficient current available.  In my experience, a 17AH gel cell will power a 25W mobile rig (like a 2m/70cm FM rig) for an entire weekend of "just receiving," or about two hours of transmitting, or any combination thereof.

73 de Steve WB2WIK/6
Logged
KE4SKY
Member

Posts: 1045


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2001, 07:49:25 AM »

A common rule of thumb we teach in Virginia RACES which works well in practical experience is to plan for a minimum battery in field deployments of one amp-hour per watt of transmitter output, for each 12-hour duty shift.

Your 17ah battery will power an HT, a TNC and a laptop for a portable packet or APRS station all day for a public service event.  It would also work well in powering a mobile rig in portable use on low or medium power, but you would have to severely limit higher power transmissions of over 25 watts.

It would work fine for QRP rig, but if using it for a higher powered HF rig such as IC706 or FT100D, you should reduce your SSB output to 25 watts to enable the battery to last for a useful amount of time.  This will work fine on 10 through 20 meters where background noise levels aren't as much of a problem.  An RF output of 25 watts is only about an S-unit in signal strength below 100 watts, but if the background noise level is high, as often is the case on 40 and 75 meters, you may not be able to maintain reliable contact on SSB at this reduced power, particularly on a compromise antenna such as a mobile whip.

A battery I can generally recommend for ARES ands RACES auxiliary power is something in the same class as the Yuasa NP65-12.  This is a sealed lead-acid 12V battery rated for 65 amp-hours at C/20 (3.25A over a 20 hours) discharge rate at 77 degs F.  It weighs about 50 pounds and has retractable handles.  You can see pictures of the battery or place an order at http://www.buck.com/yuasa.html

Tony Day, KC4AUF of Buckmaster is a battery supplier to Virginia RACES and we are very grateful for his support.

73 de KE4SKY
Virginia State RACES Training Officer

Logged
N2MR
Member

Posts: 13




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2002, 09:15:12 AM »

These people are good to deal with if you want, or can afford, a REAL battery.
http://www.aapspower.com/batteries1.html
Mark N2MR
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!