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Author Topic: Tuning Antenna  (Read 908 times)
KG4TZY
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Posts: 4




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« on: May 22, 2003, 09:48:28 AM »

I have an FT-897 and a AR-6 Ringo antenna for 6 meters.  I just can't seem to get the antenna to provide an adequate SWR.  I don't know if the 897 is overly sensitive to SWR (internal meter reads HSWR) or if the antenna is the problem.  Any recommendations?  I have strictly followed the instructions for installation of the antenna.  Any recommendations for tuners?  I have looked at the MFJ-906, but I am wary of their products based on other reviews.

Thanks
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20666




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« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2003, 12:20:41 PM »

First, I wouldn't trust the SWR metering circuit in the Yaesu at all, based on past experiences with the FT817 and other newer multi-purpose rigs.

But, then, assembling the AR-6 exactly per its directions means nothing when it comes to SWR, because there is no prescribed accurate pre-set for the tap on the ring at the base of the antenna, and that is a very critical adjustment.  If you "miss" the right spot on the ring, even by 1/8", the SWR of this antenna can be sky-high.  It's *very* critical.

Use a separate SWR bridge (not the one in the Yaesu), transmit with low power with the bridge connected directly to the antenna (or using a very short coax jumper cable between the bridge and the AR-6 feedpoint connector), loosen up the tap arm for the ring and slide the tap back and forth while monitoring SWR.  You'll find a point where the SWR dips to "perfect" (no reflected power), if you make this adjustment carefully while watching the meter.  When you find that point, tighten the machine screw that clamps the tap arm to the ring, and you're done!

But, there's no way to "pre-set" this, at all.  The adjustment must be made while monitoring SWR.

WB2WIK/6
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KG4TZY
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2003, 08:16:45 AM »

Thanks for the info.  I was patient last night and took my time tuning the antenna.  I now have an outstanding SWR from 50-51.5 MHZ and an acceptable SWR up to about 53 MHZ.  You were right on target about adjusting the tuning ring...boy that thing is sensitive.

Thanks for the help,
Brian
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WA4PTZ
Member

Posts: 528




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« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2003, 06:27:00 AM »

I had a ringo antenna once....and it beats nothing,
but just barely. There is more to tuning the Ringo
than just adjusting the ring. If you follow the
instructions you will also need to adjust the various
lengths of the rest of the antenna. Yes, the ring
adjustments can be very slight, so make adjustments
one eighth of an inch at a time and keep it at least
3 feet away from other objects. It reflects like its
going out of style.  Now, before you get too far
over your head...did you attach a dummy load to the
coax you are using to test the swr before you started
on the antenna. Remember good scientific principles.
If you don't know if the coax is good, why blame the
antenna ?
Good luck ,
 Tim
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KG4TZY
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2003, 03:06:20 PM »

Everything is working fine.  SWR is great.  In two days on 6 meters I worked 6 states and 1 country.  Not bad for a beginner.

Brian
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AA4PB
Member

Posts: 13032




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« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2003, 12:59:12 PM »

One downside to a Ringo Ranger for 6M SSB work is that it is vertically polarized while most SSB stations are horizontally polarized. In theory that amounts to a 20dB cross-polarization loss. The polarity of DX signals sometimes gets changed during propogation so you will probably not notice it to be quite as bad as theory says.

Personally, I'd recommend one of the omni directional horizontal antennas like the "squalo" for 6M SSB work.
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