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Author Topic: Would two ham stations on the street be a problem?  (Read 775 times)
VE3IOS
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Posts: 79




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« on: February 26, 2005, 05:23:41 AM »

I am looking at a piece of property in my town. There is a ham on the street already, about 1500 feet away. He is active on HF and has a tower and beam pretty much the same as mine. Would I have interference or receiver overloading problems with him being so close? I know the gentlemen and he is a pretty good guy.
Jeff
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W7DJM
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2005, 08:23:57 AM »

"""I know the gentlemen and he is a pretty good guy"""


You have just found the key to the potential problem, right there.

Discuss with him his interests, time of operating, favorite bands, and so on, and then try to form some sort of "gentlemans agreement" whereby you can co exist.

Depending on what he runs for power, operating times, etc, there might not even BE a problem.
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W7DJM
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« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2005, 08:24:46 AM »

I forgot to mention, there are people who make and sell various bandpass filters, made, for example, for multi-position field day and contest stations in close proximity.
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N3ZKP
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Posts: 2008




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« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2005, 02:58:23 PM »

I have a ham who lives next door!

His beam is approximately 150' from my vertical. He is not on the air all that often, but when he is, the only time we interfere with each other is if we are trying to operate on the same band.

Most of the time we both run 100w, but even when I run 750w it doesn't cause him problems.

Lon
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20636




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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2005, 08:37:44 AM »

If you both have beams, this helps mitigate problems quite a lot.  When you both aim in the same direction, except when this involves one of you aiming directly at the other one, you benefit a great deal from the side rejection properties of the beams.

I live only 3000' from K6SMF, who has five large towers on his lot with large monoband beams for everything from 2m through 40m and runs a kilowatt on all the HF bands, and I rarely notice when Neil's on the air (when he is!) because we're rarely aimed at each other.  If I am straight at him on 20m, he can cause me some problems; but if we're both aimed long-path with our beams parallel to each other, his signal is really just another signal on the band, and no stronger than some signals from a thousand or more miles away.

On VHF, if you and the other ham were actively using power and chasing weak signals, this would be a far bigger problem than on HF.

WB2WIK/6
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N4KZ
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Posts: 602




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« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2005, 01:51:13 PM »

Twenty years ago I lived a block from another ham. The only time we interferred with one another was when we both tried to operate on the same band and mode at the same time.

We both liked 40 meters but if he was on SSB and I was on CW, we had no problem. But if we both tried 40 SSB at the same time, that didn't work -- unless we talked with each other or got into the same roundtable, for example.

But there are some great filters on the market today that might help you guys coexist rather easily. But the most important thing is to talk with him before you buy to gauge how cooperative you all can be and what your favorite bands and modes are. Chances are it would work out fine.

Back in those days in suburban Detroit, I counted 20 hams that lived within a mile radius of my house but I seldom had any interference.

73, Dave, N4KZ
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NI0C
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Posts: 2422




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« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2005, 09:22:50 AM »

I live within about 1000 ft. of two hams who are active DX'ers on the HF bands as I am.  All three of us use our amplifiers when necessary. In addition to cooperation with each other, it helps to have good receiving equipment with the best dynamic range and IMD characteristics you can afford.  Attenuators and narrow roofing filters are important.

The other night, one of my neighbors and I were both in the same pileup on 80m CW.  When the DX was listening about 0.5 to 1.0 KHz from his transmit frequency, this was unworkable, because my neighbor's signal was still being passed by my 600 Hz BW roofing filter.   However, after the DX station moved the pileup about 5 KHz up, I could barely detect the presence of my neighbor's signal and we both made contacts.


 
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NS6Y_
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« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2005, 07:30:34 AM »

INRAD sells a book for $15 or so about interstation interference and how to avoid it, I'm considering getting a copy myself, this is useful info for contesting, living near other hams, etc.
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