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Author Topic: dissipate antenna static buildup  (Read 1305 times)
WS7X
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Posts: 25




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« on: September 30, 2007, 02:41:04 PM »

 Not looking for additional lightening protection but rather a way to drain static electricity from my antennas. I've several antennas that come into my shack to a 4 position antenna switch.  I'm convinced that either the wire antenna or multi element beam builds up static electricity that is not being shunted to ground via my ground system.  So, I'd like to drain or "short the center conductor" at the coax switch, yet not have it affect the SWR of my antennas when in use.  Anyone know of something commercial made or a simple way to do this.  

Noel
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K9KJM
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Posts: 2416




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« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2007, 10:42:31 PM »

That coax switch should really be mounted on your "Single Point Ground" panel right near where the coax enters the building.   That single point ground panel being grounded to your outdoor ground system with some wide copper flat strap.  (Roof flashing is a good source)
Installing it this way should drain static build up, AND provide a good lightning ground.

http://members.cox.net/pc-usa/station/ground0.htm
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K8AC
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Posts: 1466




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« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2007, 04:50:21 AM »

Some of the surge protectors for coax lines are grounded for DC and should provide what you're looking for.  Can't recall if it's the Polyphaser or ICE that do that, but a quick Google would provide the answer.
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KB9CRY
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« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2007, 05:54:12 AM »

It's lightning not lightening (that's bleach).

Anyone know of something commercial made or a simple way to do this.


All the good lightning arrestors do the same job for shunting off static.  I use ICE.
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W5GA
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Posts: 430




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« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2007, 09:22:06 AM »

I think the good folks at Array Solutions have what you're looking for.

http://www.arraysolutions.com/Products/staticsurgecoils.htm
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W3LK
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Posts: 5644




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« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2007, 04:52:19 PM »

Many antennas are already DC grounded by design. Check yours before you get too worried. Smiley

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12801




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« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2007, 06:03:41 AM »

Some antenna switches also ground the unused antennas. It doesn't take much current flow to discharge true static build up such as that caused by dust blowing across a wire antenna. A 10K carbon resistor across the line should do the trick.
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K1DA
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Posts: 486




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« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2007, 04:39:58 PM »

     You might want to put an ohm meter on that switch to see if the unused positions are grounded.  Really no need to wonder about it.  I use a plate choke to ground my hygain hytower at all times - that way there are no problems with a series resonance in the ham bands so it stays in all the time.  
The carbon resisor is a good idea but I would use at least a 2 watt.  "Voltage" baluns, (not the probably better current type) show a path to ground as well.  
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