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Author Topic: suggestions for garage station  (Read 842 times)
CLEBOT
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Posts: 100




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« on: October 21, 2007, 06:46:25 PM »

Good evening,

I am planning on moving my shack from its present location inside an extra room in the house to my garage, where I have a small workshop in the back.
I live in Southeast Texas, where it gets pretty hot and humid during the summers, and can get pretty cold and damp in the winter.
I have recently placed a dehumidifier in the area where the shack will be to help keep the humidity down.  There will be no air conditioning or heat in the new garage shack, and I'll just use a fan in the summers and bundle up in the winter when I operate.  Other than operator comfort, are there any special considerations I should be putting into the new shack?
Are there any precautions I should be aware of that will help my equipment avoid damage?
The structure is well-built, secure, insulated and doesn't leak.  I was just wondering what suggestions any of you might have who have similar setups.

Thanks!

Gerrit
KE5HVM
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W3LK
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Posts: 5639




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« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2007, 07:33:23 PM »

<< There will be no air conditioning or heat in the new garage shack, and I'll just use a fan in the summers and bundle up in the winter when I operate.>>

Having spent more than a few years all over Texas (including Houston), I think this is a mistake. Creature comfort is the number one consideration. If you are not comfortable. your operating pleasure will go down the drain real fast.

It isn't that difficult OR expensive to heat and cool the shack. A window A/C unit and an electric strip heater will make all the difference in the workd and shouldn't cost more than a couple of hundred dollars, not counting electricity. I bought a 10,000 BTU A/C for a little over $100 this summer.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
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W5GA
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Posts: 430




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« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2007, 09:05:46 AM »

I agree, get some heat and air in there.  Insulation is a good thing also.
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N5YPJ
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« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2007, 09:50:27 AM »

Get an A/C and heat in your new shack or consider staying put. Besides creature comfort I've found some PCs to not be all weather machines and to quickly shutdown when it gets hot, not to mention the condensation ruining your electronics. Mud daubers. I'd stay put or invest a little in climate control.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2007, 01:57:43 PM »

Comfort aside, most garages are a bit drafty since there's usually this big overhead door that opens with clearance around it -- so even when it's closed, drafts get in and blow much more dust around than you'd ever have inside the "house."

Open the door on a windy day, and you might have not only dust but also leaves and miscellaneous airborne debris blowing around in the garage.  I know I do.

That settles not only *on* the rigs and operating surfaces, but also *in* the rigs, and can do damage to the equipment over the long term.  Dust settles on everything including switch and relay contacts, etc.  It's a nuisance.

So I guess if I were investing in stuff to upgrade the garage for hamshack use, besides heat and A/C I might invest in a very good air purefier/filtration system and I think you'll find its filter gets filled every few days...

WB2WIK/6
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N6KYS
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« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2007, 08:57:35 PM »

Definitely reconsider this.  Your rigs will corrode in the humidity, and the skank and funk that will be on every surface inside of them will ruin them.  It's a combination of humidity and dust.....gets on them like a permanent epoxy primer.  Your rigs aren't designed with rugged use in mind....the metals are unprotected.  Keep them inside and away from dust and any extremes in temp and humidity.
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KD8Z
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« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2007, 05:58:14 PM »

I really like the air filters on the market today.  The Hepa filters are somewhat expensive for replacement filters, but they really benefit the equipment.
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KG4RUL
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« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2007, 08:28:22 AM »

I used to have the shack in the garage.  In the winter, I could not get it reasonably warm, and this is a South Carolina winter we are talking about!  In the summer, it was a sweat box even with fans and screens on the doors to allow ventilation without getting eaten alive by the skeeters.  And the icing on the cake was that everything got dirty very quickly.  Really not a good idea at all!
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KT8K
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« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2007, 06:47:18 AM »

When the weather gets cold and foggy your shack will experience a "condensing atmosphere", and every little thing including the individual parts in your equipment will be coated in moisture - NOT good.  You will definitely need "climate control" in your shack, and control of dust, etc. will be a big help, too.  You may be able to cool, heat, and control humidity passively - that would be very "green" and cost effective - but you will need to do it somehow.
Best rx & 73 de kt8k - Tim
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N3BIF
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Posts: 1190




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« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2007, 01:03:04 PM »

 A tent on the lawn would be better.

  For condensation think of the movie Apollo 13 when the capsule instruments were dripping wet.

 Unless you, in effect, build a self contained room in the garage as if it were part of the living quarters (climate controlled) you will regret this deeply.
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