Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Sound proofing  (Read 1263 times)
KC0YVW
Member

Posts: 17




Ignore
« on: May 08, 2008, 09:06:22 PM »

I'm developing a new station in the basement of my small home and I will need to acoustically damp a small area (about 6x10 feet) from the rest of the house. This area is already framed and rocked but sound travels in our limited space and I'm looking for sound dampening ideas that I can afford.  I'm thinking of simply paneling the walls with acoustic ceiling tile and overlaying that with conveluted foam but I wanted to float this out to others that may have had similar issues and resolved or mitigated the problem with some economical or creative solutions.

TNX

KCØYVW
Logged
KB9CRY
Member

Posts: 4283


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2008, 03:04:36 AM »

McMaster Carr
Logged
N1QOQ
Member

Posts: 188




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2008, 05:02:10 AM »

I've seen people use indoor/outdoor carpeting on walls to stop that "echo". 73 Paul
Logged
KG4RUL
Member

Posts: 2752


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2008, 06:59:11 AM »

I have used the old style, paper pulp, egg cartons with great results.
Logged
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2008, 07:16:39 AM »

What are you trying to do, make a totally sound proof room or eliminate echo and reverberation?

Actually, proper microphone technique will eliminate the majority of echo and reverberation and ambient noise at no cost. Close talking (mouth 1 to 2 inches away from the mike) and a lower mike gain will do it.

As for the room, carpet on the floor and two walls - to eliminate reflections - works.

If you are trying to totally soundproof the room, you will need more than a little carpet and tile. You will need thick, solid walls and commercial sound deadening foam, at the very least.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
KC0YVW
Member

Posts: 17




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2008, 07:44:10 AM »

Good ideas.  I'm mostly trying to reduce echo and deaden loud CW reception etc. when I'm off the head phones.  Too many years of working with machinery without proper ear protection have left me with some hearing loss so the volume tends to creep up without thinking.

Tom - KCØYVW
Logged
AI4NS
Member

Posts: 320


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2008, 09:00:01 AM »

If the walls are already up, you can also rent an insulation blower from your favorite home improvement store, drill holes between the studs, and fill up the walls with blow in cellulose insulation. That will take care of a lot of the noise, and is pretty cheap to do.
Logged
K8AC
Member

Posts: 1478




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2008, 04:44:08 PM »

I know you said the area was already framed and sheetrocked, but... One very effective way of killing the sound transmission through the walls is to use a different set of 2x4 studs for each side of a common wall.  You'd use a 2x6 for the top and bottom plate, and then align the 2x4s for each room flush with that room's side of the 2x6s.  The result is that sound hitting one side of the wall can't be transmitted to the wall surface in the adjacent room because there is no common structure to carry the vibrations.  If the sheetrock isn't finished in the operating room, it might be worth redoing the framing to accomodate the additional studding.
Logged
KC0YVW
Member

Posts: 17




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2008, 05:00:49 PM »

Floyd, that's brilliant!  It won't work in this specific situation but I will remember this trick in the future.  I'll bet if you stuff some fiber insulation in there it would help deaden any resonance as well.  This is the ingenutie that I'm looking for.


TNX
73 - Tom
Logged
K0XU
Member

Posts: 294




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2008, 05:33:49 PM »

Another trick I have seen, but never used. Take the studs before installing and rip through the middle of the board except for a half a foot or so on each end. Basically converting the 2x4 into 2 2x2s. Then insulate the wall with fiber bats or whatever. I wouldn't recommend it for a load bearing wall though. My shack has poured concrete walls, floor & ceiling with a minimum of 2 inches of foam behind the sheet rock. The XYL uses the intercom to yell at me (and I can shut that off!!).

Jim
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 13032




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2008, 05:47:35 PM »

I'm not sure the 2x2 would meet local building codes in most places.
Logged
KC0YVW
Member

Posts: 17




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2008, 08:56:18 PM »

Jim,
Sounds like the bomb shelter in my dads house that he built in the late 50's, at the height of the cold-war. That would be ideal, I remember my mom making me practice my trumpet in there when I was in Jr. High.

Fire saftey is also an issue as I don't want to use material that would cause a problem.  I'm thinking acoustic ceiling panels or some of the industrial stuff mentioned at McMasters Carr etc.  Only problem there is cost and I kind of what to do this on the cheap.

I remember doing the egg crate thing in my college dorm room, got the idea from WKRP in Cincinnati and Dr. Johnny Fever.  Difference is, back then I had access to a HUGE cafeteria with those big square, pulp paper egg crates.

Good ideas.......keep'm coming.

TNX
Tom

Logged
N9GXA
Member

Posts: 119




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: June 05, 2008, 12:10:34 PM »

The dual-studded wall idea is used around here. Especially in multi-family homes. For best results, the two studded walls should be separated by 1/2" of air. Even if they touch at the top and bottom, the sound will transmit through to the outer wall. At least that's what we have found.

73, GL
Paul
N9GXA
Logged
DWEISS
Member

Posts: 10


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: January 08, 2009, 05:35:45 PM »

I realize this is an old post, but just in case the information is still useful to someone, two thoughts:

1. The off-set 2x4 studs with insulation in between is one of the best and standard methods of helping to isolate rooms from one another acoustically.

2. During my earliest ham days - in my bedroom in my parent's house - my father and I were able to substantially reduce sound transmission between my room and others by covering the walls with cork board tiles.  It was either half or one inch thick, I cannot remember exactly.  We covered at least two of the walls with the stuff and it served both as a sound dampening solution and provided a lot of "bulletin board" space in the room - perfect for pinning up QSL cards, maps, and so on.  As far as sound proofing, it was good enough that I could work a contest all night as my parents slept in the room next to me.

   -Danny.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!