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Author Topic: Need help with VHF/UHF DXing  (Read 1109 times)
BEAST
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« on: October 18, 2000, 05:36:33 PM »

I am looking for useful information on VHF and UHF DXing.  I understand that this is a difficult thing to do, and it involves many things I currently have no access to, but I am researching right now.  Any web sites, books, or just regular old advice would be appreciated.  
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KB9UMT
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2000, 10:39:20 PM »

Hope these will give you a good start. I have spent hours on end reading from these pages and always learn something new.  Good Luck and happy dxing de KB9UMT Don

http://www.ac6v.com/pagew.html
http://www.dmoz.org/Recreation/Amateur_Radio/VHF/
http://n5xu.ae.utexas.edu/vhf/
http://www.anarc.org/wtfda/propagation.htm
http://home.cfl.rr.com/happysurfer/hamlynx/hamvhf.htmhttp://www.ilk.de/sites/gap/
http://www.globalserve.net/~hepburnw/tropo.html
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K2AXX
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« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2000, 01:57:19 PM »

There are a MILLION aspects to VHF/UHF DXing. Meteor Scatter, Digital, Moonbounce. . the whole ball o' wax.
Depending on what you are interested in, there are websites available to learn from.

Here are some sites, covering a variety:

http://www.go.to/beaconet - All about using packet radio to work DX via meteor scatter or other modes of propagation.

http://www.harrisonradio.com - Joel Harrison, W5ZN has an interesting collection of stuff to check out.

My club (The Rochester VHF Group) has a website which has tons of links as well.
http://vhfgroup.rochesterny.org

Start there. Depending on where you live, might try to find a specialty group that caters to VHF and above operations. They'd be more than willing to help you out.

Good Luck, hope to work you sometime!

Mark, K2AXX
Chairman, Rochester (NY) VHF Group
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N1GMV
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« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2000, 11:03:53 PM »

Try www.VHFOnline.com
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WF0H
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« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2000, 05:35:36 PM »

It's always safest to say that "it depends".

VHF/UHF 'DX' depends a lot on where you live and what you consider 'DX'.  

I live near the top of a substantial hill that gives me a good shot to the East, North, and South, and  a pretty obstructed path to the West.   From here in SouthEast Minnesota, with 100W and a small yagi, I can usually work stations to the East as far as Michigan regularly and Ohio, Kentucky, and New York under more unusually good conditions.  In my obstructed direction,  West, I can usually work South Dakota with difficulty on two meters and up, and have worked North Dakota a couple times.  To the South, I can generally work as far south as St. Louis under good conditions. Now, I am talking about conditions that are available most evenings. The biggest factor is finding another station to work when there is no VHF contest going on.

Band openings are not too unusual at certain times of the year.  I have seen several enormous tropo-ducting sessions between here and the southern US - there have been reports of people working Cuba that way, too.  Here, when we have a warm front moving in over very cold ground, you can generally count on terrific tropo openings all over the midwest.  

Aurora is more unusual,  but can provide a dramatic band opening when it happens.  However, on two meters,  CW is definitely the preferrred mode for aurora - SSB signals are very hard to copy due to the doppler shift 'hissing' on the aurora signals.  

Six and two meters both experience E-skip at various times of the year - usually peaking in summer and winter.  This is much more common on six meters, and often provides fairly consistent openings to other parts of the country.  This propagation is not as dependent on your location - when the band is open,  it does not take a huge, powerful station.  When I got my first 6 meter SSB rig years ago, the only antenna I could muster was a rapidly cut wire dipole thrown up on the roof - I managed to work lots of 6 meter E skip DX with just a few watts!  

So,  hope this gives you some encouragement to try VHF! We need more people up here above 50 Mhz!  

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MI0AEY
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« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2001, 07:32:49 PM »

Hi--Biggest thing left to do on vhf from this side of the pond is to have a 2meter transatlantic qso from europe to east coast usa/canada--Its been tried from Ireland and the UK that I know of -but with no definite success-I definitely plan to try it myself one day--its the last big acheivement waiting to be made on the vhf band from here.
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