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Author Topic: June VHF Contest Antenna Help  (Read 2801 times)
KA4NMA
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Posts: 341




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« on: May 27, 2013, 01:52:22 AM »

I am looking for some simple antenna's to use on the June VHF contest (6m-70cm). I am looking for dipoles, loops, big wheels, etc. It needs to be horizontally polarized and small. What do you have or suggest? How would a wire full wave loop work?  How would a dual band (2m and 70cm) dipole or full wave loop work?  I do not have much room, so a yagi would be difficult.
 

Randy Ka4nma
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K5TR
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« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2013, 11:18:50 AM »

I have used a full wave loop (quad element) on both 2m and 70cm with good results.
And dipoles and verticals have worked well for me on 6 meters.

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George
K5TR
KO1D
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« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2013, 10:40:19 AM »

If you can order it fast and get it up why not a log periodic? They look like TV antennas and give you a bit of gain and directionality on all those bands.

Another quick option would be the quad. Great antenna that could be whipped up quick.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2013, 02:47:41 PM »

Small, lightweight and simple horizontal antennas work best from mountaintops. Wink

For a home station, unless one happens to live on a mountaintop, they can be really disappointing.

Are you going to operate "hilltop portable?"  If so, I have lots of lightweight simple antennas that will work well for you.
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KA4NMA
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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2013, 06:15:53 PM »

Not many hills in the area I live.  What antennas do you have?  Any suggestions?

Randy ka4nma
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N9DG
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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2013, 07:31:13 PM »

Do a web search on "WA5VJB Cheap Yagi". They are a series of very good performing, easily reproducible, inexpensive antenna designs that you can build for the 144 through 1296 MHz bands. Kent, WA5VJB knows his antennas, practical real world antennas, not just theoretical ones.
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KQ6Q
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Posts: 979




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« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2013, 08:03:05 PM »

If VHF QSO's could come from any direction, a beam will normally be pointed the wrong way!
I had beams for years, got rid of them and now use OmniAngle loops. Phased for 2m, single for 6m.
Check out the reviews here on eham.net

Fred KQ6Q
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K5LXP
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« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2013, 08:33:48 AM »

Not many hills in the area I live.  What antennas do you have? 

Antennas themselves won't generate contacts.  A rubber duck on an HT can talk out 100 miles on top of a mountain, but you'd be lucky to work 10 miles with a big yagi close to the ground.

Focus first on location.  From there, a nominal gain antenna (3el yagi) will have plenty of gain to work anyone within line of sight.

If you're lucky 6M will open up, then things get interesting.  Otherwise this contest will be just working the same locals on as many bands as you have radios for.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2013, 08:43:41 AM »

Not many hills in the area I live.  What antennas do you have?  Any suggestions?

Randy ka4nma

I see you're in eastern NC.  Pity, since western NC has lots of big hills! Wink  Highest point on the east coast is in NC.

But from where you are, I'd take it "portable" to Cape Hatteras and set up as close to the beach as possible.  That is a very, very good VHF location (I've operated from there a few times) with a "shot" up and down the coast from Maine to Florida, and not a bad shot inland either because the whole area is quite flat and free of obstructions.

From there, I'd use small beams on a telescoping mast installed on a drive-on mount.  A drive-on mount is nothing more than a bracket that supports the bottom end of a tall mast and has a horizontal "footing" bracket that you drive a tire over.  Park on it, and it won't go anywhere -- the vehicle becomes the support system.  Wilburt makes professional powdered aluminum telescoping masts up to about fifty feet, which collapse down to five feet and can go "up" or "down" in less than 60 seconds (human power).  Those are very expensive if purchased new, but they can be found surplus at about 10-20% of the new price, and of course something similar can be homebrewed for less.

Using a 5L 6m beam at the Cape back in '86, and just 25W PEP on 6m SSB, I worked 48 states, all over the Caribbean, four Canadian provinces and Mexico in one weekend (June).  I heard some stuff I couldn't work, and more power would have helped.

From Chincoteague Island, VA (FM27) in June '87 and again in June '88 (went there two years in a row to activate FM27), we worked a lot of VHF and took 1st place for the Division, a record that held for several years.  In June '87, in 36 hours on 6m SSB-CW, we worked all 50 states and 13 countries (multiop operation, WB2WIK/4) during the VHF contest.  We were at two feet above sea level, right on the beach.  HUGE advantage to being "right on the beach..." we could work stuff that guys just 10 miles inland couldn't hear at all -- consistently.
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KA4NMA
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« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2013, 06:01:45 PM »

I used to live in Western North Carolina.  I would go to a certain mountain near where I lived I did hill topping with a 5 element 2m beam and 10 watts.  I had a 10ft tv pole attached to the truck and used an Armstrong rotor.  That was back in the 80's when I was in high school and college.  One time I brought along a 6m rig and with a vertical I worked the NM.  Those were the days....

Randy ka4nma
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KE4DRN
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« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2013, 06:32:33 PM »

hi,

how about a moxon, similar gain as a two element yagi
but it is direct fed with 50 ohm coax and takes up less space.
Can be used vertical for FM or horizontal for SSB.

http://www.moxonantennaproject.com/iz8hhq/IZ8HHQ.htm

http://w4.vp9kf.com/moxon_design.htm

Easy to build and you are on the air fast!

If you can't drive out to Hatteras, how about Beaufort, about 80 miles.

73 james
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