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Author Topic: Attitudes against CW over the years  (Read 6387 times)
AB9NZ
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Posts: 176




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« Reply #75 on: January 26, 2010, 06:46:05 AM »

WX7G said- "The CW folks can do their thing - and be thankful that we still have CW subbands". I've never wanted to call an electrical engineer a CBer just because she doesn't care to pound brass, however I am concerned that we don't actually have cw hf subbands. A fellow not schooled in telegraphy can download a program, and run modem noise in the traditionally morse parts of the band, wreaking havoc, yet unable to hear the cries of the keepers of the flame. Perhaps this thought could be a topic of continued discussion.
Take very good care folks, de Tom, AB9NZ, Mount Prospect,Illinois
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AB9NZ
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Posts: 176




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« Reply #76 on: January 26, 2010, 07:07:13 AM »

To continue my thought, perhaps the effort spent trying to force people to learn code could have been put to better use protecting pieces of the spectrum for cw only for eternity. I was surprised to see the debate rarely went in that direction.
Respectfully, Tom, AB9NZ Mount Prospect, Illinois
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K5END
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Posts: 1309




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« Reply #77 on: January 26, 2010, 08:30:06 AM »


K5END: "I couldn't care less if what I do impresses some old timer or if he thinks I am a complete lid."

Why not? Seems to me that if you're trying to learn something, such as Morse Code, the reactions of those who know the most about it should be a good indicator of how you're doing.

Not that anyone should kow-tow to OTs just because they're OTs, but there's the chance that those folks actually do know a thing or two.

I'm a firm believer in learning from the experienced.

Aside from that, what I do care about is useful information in their response. Vague, positive feedback has limited use.

But if someone says, "hey, Lid. UR RST is 191, with horrible clicks," I say "TU CUL" and I check out my gear.

It's a good thing I guess, that one "dah" is very dissimilar to "di-di-dah-dit," minimizing the temptation.

But, on the keyboard "T" and "F" are dangerously close.

Another good reason to use a key/paddle and not a keyboard.

Smiley  

« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 08:52:36 AM by K5END » Logged
WX7G
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Posts: 5987




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« Reply #78 on: January 26, 2010, 11:18:39 AM »

K5END I'm not hearing any digital mode guys except at the upper end of the CW bands. They must get bothered during CW contests as the first 100 kHz gets pretty much filled with contesters.
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N2EY
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Posts: 3877




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« Reply #79 on: January 26, 2010, 04:14:54 PM »

K5END writes: "I'm a firm believer in learning from the experienced."

Who are often OTs...

K5END: "Aside from that, what I do care about is useful information in their response. Vague, positive feedback has limited use."

But specific positive feedback is another story..

K5END: "But if someone says, "hey, Lid. UR RST is 191, with horrible clicks," I say "TU CUL" and I check out my gear."

Actually such an RST would indicate that you were completely unreadable, very strong, and had a note like a buzz saw going through a pine knot. There should be a K at the end to indicate clicks, too.

IMHO a better response would be something like "497K, snds like rig trbl"

There are ways to give negative feedback without being insulting.

Some folks are better at it than others.
 
73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
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« Reply #80 on: January 26, 2010, 05:56:18 PM »

WX7G: "Can one say that a new ham is 1/4 of what an old ham was?"

One can say it but that doesn't make it true...
 
WX7G: "However, a particular 'new' ham can possess technical knowledge sufficient to pass an old time amateur extra exam. He can also learn CW such that he could pass an old time (1 minute solid copy out of 5 minutes and a sending test) CW test. So, a 'new' ham could be the equal of an old time ham."

It all depends on the individual. What really matters is what someone does with the license.

I think what's really behind the whole license-requirement debate is two different mindsets.

The first mindset sees amateur radio as something where standards, skills and knowledge of various kinds are important. Where there should be meaningful license tests and where amateurs are expected to have technical and operating know-how. That doesn't mean every ham must have EE level knowledge or be a top CW op, but it does mean that we should all strive for more than the bare minimum required to be legal. And that we should take amateur radio somewhat seriously.

The second mindset sees amateur radio as "just a hobby", and thinks that there should be no real standards or expectations beyond the bare minimum - if that. You see the word "hobby" often used as a way of saying "don't take it seriously".

But after reading about the fine work done by amateur radio in conjunction with the Haiti disaster, "just a hobby" just doesn't seem very accurate. Sure, amateur radio didn't fill *all* the communications roles, but some very important work was done by hams.

Remember that next time you see someone use the H-word to describe amateur radio.
 
WX7G: "The CW folks can do their thing - and be thankful that we still have CW subbands - while the fone and digital folks do their thing."

In the US rules, the only CW subbands are (ironically) on 6 and 2 meters. All the other non-phone HF subbands are shared with data modes. Why data modes aren't allowed in the 'phone subbands is a mystery.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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KF5AHV
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Posts: 56




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« Reply #81 on: January 27, 2010, 06:37:16 AM »

Y'all leave poor old K6LHA alone! He probably doesn't have the strength in them old arms to pound brass...
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K5END
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Posts: 1309




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« Reply #82 on: January 29, 2010, 05:23:53 PM »

There should be a K at the end to indicate clicks, too.

Thanks, I had read that somewhere but forgotten about the K. I think that might even be a question on one of the license exams.

I don't hear a lot of clicks, but when I do they are on very strong signals. (I suspect amplifiers.)

Will be on tonight listening for a good QRS CQ I can answer, clicks or otherwise.

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KG4TKC
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Posts: 72




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« Reply #83 on: January 30, 2010, 08:59:56 AM »

Hi K5END,where do you hang out listening for QRS type QSO's? I may look into seeing if we could try one of those on a path between Texas and Kentucky,:) Maybe somewhere around 7.050 or 7.112 would be kind to us. 73-KG4TKC
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AB3KI
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #84 on: January 30, 2010, 06:35:56 PM »

The thread is titled "Attitudes against CW over the years", I have read most of the posts, some things I agree and some I don't.  
Just for background, a quick look in my logbook shows about half ssb and half cw contacts.  
My comment is that I want my ham radio hobby to be fun.  Otherwise, why do it?  To make it fun, fellas, let's tone down on the negativity.  If you have something good to say about your fellow ham...
Granted, there are things that need to be mentioned once in a while, to correct a situation.  But to go on and on with the griping and complaining is a downer.  
So, with that in mind, let's keep it fun.  
It's probably the most important thing, and would be the highest on the list of reasons that attract new people, especially kids.  
Ask yourself - is CW fun?  Do you enjoy it?  What characteristic or factor makes it so enjoyable?
AB3KI - JOE
P.S. Oh, I forgot - this is an eHam forum.  OK, go back to your gripes and complaints!
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K5END
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Posts: 1309




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« Reply #85 on: January 30, 2010, 06:58:43 PM »

Hi K5END,where do you hang out listening for QRS type QSO's? I may look into seeing if we could try one of those on a path between Texas and Kentucky,:) Maybe somewhere around 7.050 or 7.112 would be kind to us. 73-KG4TKC

Would be great. For some reason I have very few Kentucky QSOs. Lots of Ohio, and the midwest, but few in KY.

To answer the question, wherever I find QRS, which seems to occur anywhere from time to time. I usually listen around 3050 and tune up and down, or 7050 +/- and above 7100, depending on the RTTY traffic or if it is a contest weekend.

Sorry I did not see your post until tonight. We can set up for 80 tonight if you care to. Kentucky may be too close for 40 meters this late. I have a low inverted V for 3550 that seems to cover an area encompassing Arizona, Virginia and Ontario and most states in between.

I'm headed to the shack now, as I just turned the heater on out there a few minutes ago. Will have a laptop out there and will check periodically. Or U can email me at my call sign at the arrl address. I need to move the coax over to the "V", so it will take a minute after I hear from you.

73
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KG4TKC
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Posts: 72




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« Reply #86 on: January 31, 2010, 04:59:10 PM »

Sorry K5END,I missed your post yesterday. I was not very active on HF last night. The 6 inches of snow and -3 degrees F sort of messed up my Saturday. I will shoot you out an email later on and maybe we can check out the best frequency on a path from East Kentucky to Texas sometime very soon. 73 es CUL KG4TKC
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W7ETA
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Posts: 2528




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« Reply #87 on: January 31, 2010, 10:19:51 PM »

If you really wanna have FUN with CW, try the "glow-bug" forum and build your own CW xmitter.

I wanted to find out what state of the art was when I was born.  So, I bought 1 1948 ARRL HandBook.  I bought a 1949 first, it was cheaper than the 49.

I had a schematic for a dual 6L6, 6L6 osc driving a 6L6.  Since I had some 6L6G types hanging around, I started collecting parts from ebay.  I bought some oak wood from HomeDepot, ordered resistors from Mouser, got a 40 meter CW xtal, wound my own coil for the Pi network I made.

I learned a lot; have a new appreciation for going from a schematic to point to point wiring, and have a HUGE grim whenever I plug her in!

I feel sorry for new Techs.  I was limited to CW only in a Novice bands.

I can't imagine trying to make an SSB xmitter.

Maybe this summer I'll try looking at building an AM xmitter?

Building from a schematic, and not having it blow up when I plugged it in, gave me the confidence to try rebuilding a HeathKit intergrated mono that had been sitting in my garage for a couple of decades.  The I bought an integrated stereo Heathkit; Scott gear; Dynaco FM3.  Got some full rage speakers headed this way and a table saw for DIY stereo speakers.

Learning CW lead me back to Ohm's law, and then into unexpected new "old" vistas.

73
Bob
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