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Author Topic: What was I hearing on 7.218.0 MHz????  (Read 595 times)
KF5DIU
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Posts: 1




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« on: January 09, 2010, 01:34:56 PM »

I am located south of Houston Texas.  I listened in on an on-going conversation (on 40 meters ā€“ Freq: 7.218.0 MHz) between a group of three or more people this afternoon (1.9.2010, 20:00ā€“21:00 UTC).  All the stations had an equally strong signal.  They seemed to be conducting some kind of technical testing of some sort.  Their conversation (in English) went on for will over an hour without ever using an amateur ID or any other call-sign for that matter.  Every once in awhile Iā€™d hear a Morris Code tone which I assumed was some sort of Station ID.

Does anybody have any idea what I was listening to?


Thanks
Dave / KF5DIU
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W7ETA
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Posts: 2527




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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2010, 04:53:33 PM »

Well.  To start with Morse code is allowed in the phone bands.  And, can be used for ID.

73
Bob
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VE3PLO
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2010, 09:27:23 PM »

One does not have to identify itself verbaly. It can be done with morse code. Whatever method you preffer, but has to be done every 30 or 45 minutes, not really sure on that.
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AE5JU
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« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2010, 10:59:42 AM »

In the USA FCC regulations requires amateur radio operators' call signs to be transmitted at the end of a communication and every ten minutes during communication.
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AE5JU
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« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2010, 11:03:30 AM »

In Canada, from this Industry Canada publication:

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/vwapj/rbr4e.pdf/$FILE/rbr4e.pdf

"The operator of any amateur station shall transmit the applicable identification referred to in Section 9.1 or 9.2, in English or in French, at the beginning and at the end of each period of exchange of communication or test transmission, and at intervals of not more than 30 minutes throughout the period of exchange of communication."

Which is longer than in the USA's 10 minute intervals.
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K0OD
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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2010, 09:59:56 AM »

"Well. To start with Morse code is allowed in the phone bands."

True, except for 60 meters where only USB is allowed in the U.S.
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2010, 02:35:30 PM »

But we're not talking 60 meters here...

And don't overlook that much of 40 mtrs is a shared service, too.  It isn't all ham all over the world. 

Without being able to copy the CW, you really have no idea what it may have been that you heard or where it might have been coming from.  You don't even know if the CW you heard was from the same sources. 

A recording of what you heard, so that others could hear and analyze might shed more light, all should have some method of recording what is heard in their shacks...

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NT4G
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« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2010, 03:01:16 PM »

Sounds like you don't copy code. Not that it is a requirement anymore BUT it is an allowed form of identification during phone conversations. Some of us actually converse using old Sam-mule Morris' way of a clickin' and stuff.. Un Huh...
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