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Author Topic: ? on 'letter speaking' software  (Read 2071 times)
AF4XK
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« on: February 02, 2010, 04:18:00 PM »

Hello guys.

I'm still trying to learn to copy code in my head. I can copy lots of individual words but I loose the train of thought when I try to string them together and for a sentence... not very helpful in a qso.

So i thought it would be great if there was a pc program
that would take a text file (of a book or qso) and Speak each individual LETTER. That way one could learn to string the words together into sentences as if copying code.

Anyone ever heard of such?

thanks.
chuck
73
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AE4RV
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« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2010, 05:43:49 PM »

Chuck, I'm in the same boat. I've read that this is a useful technique. I hope there is something out there better than what I have found in the last 45 minutes, but until we learn of that, let me tell you what I found.

http://text-to-speech.imtranslator.net/

This site has a text box that you can paste text in to and it will read it to you. If you insert spaces between all the letters, and a comma between all the words, it is exactly what we are looking for. You can even vary the speed. In my quick testing, I can see how this would help us.

The problem is, you find some text, copy it, paste it, insert spaces and commas, and well, you become fairly familiar with the text! So, some simple script that would format text the way we need it is in order. I will research this, too. I should be able to do it myself in Flash or Java - shouldn't be too hard. Not going to happen tonight, though.

Thanks for asking this question - I want to pursue every avenue I can to prove that I am able to learn to recognize words and sentences in fast Morse, and string them together. I have hit 41 WPM in RufzXP but my on air ability is writing things down at 18 WPM. (sometimes I just take notes but not usually)

I don't think this exercise should be used much over actual Morse code practice (and QSOs)...but it's probably a nice supplement.

Best,

Geoff
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W4YA
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« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2010, 06:52:27 PM »

I have posted this before. You guys are going about this in a much too complicated way.

Try this ----

Get a pad of 3X5" note paper. The idea is that you will use only ONE (1) piece of paper per QSO. Write anything you want on the paper. Write as big or small as you want. When the paper is full, the QSO is over! 73, TU

After a very short time, you will find that you are  copying in your head and writing very little down on the paper slips.

Soon, you will use one slip of 3X5 for 5 or 10 QSOs.

73, Jim W4YA
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AF4XK
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« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2010, 05:31:42 AM »

Thanks for the suggestions guys.

73
chuck
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AA4PB
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« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2010, 06:09:59 AM »

I think the ability to copy in your head is related to the ability to copy the common words as a complete word rather than individual letters. There are some programs around that send, in Morse, words like "the", "and", etc. at high speeds so that you are forced to recognize the entire word. I think that would be most useful. Soon you'll find that you can recognize these words far beyond the code speed that you can copy individual letters and that ability will give you the time you need to copy the more unusual words by letters.
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AH6GI
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« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2010, 06:11:27 AM »

I'd like the opposite.

I'd like a training CD that would say the word, then send the morse at 35+.  

I'd like to learn the words, a few hundred words, not just, NAME, QTH, RST, HR, DE, RIG, WX, 5NN, etc.

A thousand words would be great.

Say the word, send it real fast.

Why doesn't such a CD exist.  The 1,000 common words.  Someone could make a little money.

What would be on it?  100 countries, 100 cities, ICOM, Collins, BOB, TOM, ED, common contest exchanges, CQSS.

The CD could start at 35 WPM, sending once.  Another might send the morse twice but at 40 WPM.

de ah6gi/4
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AF4XK
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« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2010, 06:32:51 AM »

With both G4fon and justlearnmorsecode (which i really like) you can send 100 or whatever number common words at your selected speed. While i think there is merit to training with recognizing 'common work patterns' i also think it can cause problems such as when you begin to hear a word/pattern, have a preconceived notion of what you expect the outcome to be (i.e. one of your known patterns) and then it changes halfway thru. That tends to throw me for a loop and i miss the next couple of words. If anyone gets all of this figured out please let me know.

chuck
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AE4RV
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« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2010, 07:04:16 AM »

I'm with you, Chuck. And though it might be changing as of recently, I don't operate much - I get 90% of my CW practice artificially. This weekend I'm going to make a Flash page that formats text so that the online text reader will say letters instead of words. I want to practice that way a few times and see if it helps.
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K6LO
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« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2010, 12:37:00 PM »

I think too many new to code focus too hard on transcript quality copy.  Example: "My name is Bi..."
Sure it could be Bigelow, Biff, or Bink, but 99 percent of the time it is going to be Bill.  Jot down Bill when you hear Bi.  You are that much farther ahead. The other station sent "San Fra", relax, jot down SFO, and you are that much more farther ahead. Copy with some intelligent assumptions, and use the extra time to jot down the essentials and refer to them if you need to refresh your memory. It is not neccesary to be be a court reporter.

73 Luke
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AA4PB
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« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2010, 12:47:19 PM »

There is no need to write down every letter for normal QSOs. Just listen and make notes of the important stuff just like you would if working voice.
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AE4RV
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« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2010, 01:35:59 PM »

What Chuck and I want is faster head copy. Hearing words instead of letters. I can (often) copy in my head below 20wpm, but I am stringing letters together and thinking about the words being formed. I can copy in my head at 30wpm, but I miss most of it, especially longer words, and I don't have time to think about it the way I do at 18wpm. I want it to be automatic.

The book The Art and Skill of Radio Telegraphy suggests having a friend read a paragraph to you out loud, saying the letters, not the words. This is supposed to help with head copy. It's something I want to try.

PS: I tried to get a friend to do this with me but she didn't seem to get the request and I dropped it. The problem started with "where do I get random simple text?" and went on from there...
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AE4RV
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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2010, 01:54:45 PM »

Actually, disregard my post above, unless you care to learn more about where I'm at.

What I was trying to say to the gents who said "Just copy in your head" is, that's the point of this thread. That's what we're trying to learn to do (better).
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K5END
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« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2010, 02:28:56 PM »

Yes, there is software that will spell the words instead of speak them. I've heard it used before on a machine with that "Stephen Hawking" voice.

However, from this newbie's point of view, I can tell you this.

I didn't try to learn head copy. But after working on code for a while I noticed that I would finish the words in my head before they were completed. Not long after that I found myself copying common words instead of letters.

Again, what this newbie believes is that it will just come with practice. Sure, there are plenty of WRONG ways to learn code, but all the good ways to learn have one thing in common: practice your butt off. There are no shortcuts.

I also noticed that the speed needs to be sufficiently high before head copy is even an issue. If it is too slow, I daydream or whatever in between the characters and find myself a bit bored, and getting all arrogant and s**t about how slow some ops are. Buncha lids, right? Then I realized that 15 wpm ragchew is still pretty slow, and was eating humble pie on a recent evening when I couldn't send more than 2 or 3 characters in a row without screwing something up, like leaving off a dit at the end of 5 and sending "H0 WATTS TO A..." Nuthin' like a good reality check to keep us humble, and practicing.
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AE4RV
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« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2010, 03:37:55 PM »

I've been practicing Morse since before I was a ham, just for sport. This netted me a 13wpm endorsement when I got my Tech and a 20wpm endorsement when I got General. Yes, I was a very happy camper! But I never got above 20wpm because I couldn't copy in my head. Lately I've made this my number one priority in radio and have been using several methods to practice. My practice hasn't left me empty handed - I can now copy most callsigns at 40wpm.

At slow speeds, I get the day dreaming. Around 17wpm (under good condx) I can more or less copy in my head. Above that and it's too much work - I can assemble the words but not the sentences, the meaning. Learning to hear words, effortlessly, is for some reason very challenging to me. That's why I'm seeking a new way to practice.
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AE4RV
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« Reply #14 on: February 05, 2010, 05:46:54 PM »

Alright I did it. It's a couple of hoops to jump through but not too bad.

Copy some text - news, email, whatever, best something that you are not familiar with.

Then go here:
http://ae4rv.com/tn/text2speech_formatter.html

Follow the instructions and click the link on that page to get to the text-to-speech page. Paste in your newly formatted text, press Say It, then close your eyes.

Chuck, I can see how this might be good head-copy practice to supplement listening to CW and getting on the air. Thanks for posting this thread and getting me thinking about this - I wanted to try it.

73,
Geoff
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