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Author Topic: Help me elmer over 200 at once!  (Read 863 times)
K8DJK
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« on: February 03, 2010, 01:38:50 PM »

I've submitted my presentation topic to Ignite Detroit (http://www.ignitedetroit.net) about Ham radio. I'd be presenting to over 200 people who generally have open and inquiring minds and could take an interest in the hobby.

Coming up with 20 slides to go through with only 5 minutes to do it in, and talk about ham radio in a way that will inform and interest, is going to be a difficult task. Since ham radio wouldn't be possible with community involvement and support, I'd like to ask for any suggestions on points to make or examples that I could use to help illustrate just how awesome our hobby and service is!

The hardest part however, is first getting selected! If you could please help out by voting for my presentation (up to 3 times), I'd stand a better chance of hoping to elmer lots of people!

I'll also make available the presentation, with audio, after the event so others can modify and use it wherever they please.

You can associate an already existing account with another site, so sign up is as easy as signing in.

http://bit.ly/ignitehamr

Thanks in advance and cheers!

Andrew, K8DJK

Though it'd probably bad luck to even talk about it, should I not get selected, I'll still work on creating a presentation that I'll be using at our Skywarn trainings and other public events.
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WA4IIF
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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2010, 02:32:41 PM »

I frequently give presentations to professional organizations and to the public. For planning a presentation, I estimate using about 2 minutes per slide. (Some slides may require less or more time to address during the presentation.) So if I have a 50-minute presentation, I would estimate using about 25 slides. If you have 5 minutes to speak, I think using 20 slides could make it very difficult to cover adequately all of your topics in the limited time. Think about it: with a 5-minute presentation and using 20 slides, you would, on the average, have to change slides 4 times a minute to stay within the allowed period. That's a lot of slide changing with not a lot of time to address the info on the slides. I suggest that you plan for about 10-12 slides (including intro and conclusion slides) and then "map" out what topics you want to cover per slide assuming 10 "core" slides. Then I suggest that you plan your presentation by identifying about 10 major topics -- or points -- you think would be appropriate for explaining ham radio and fit them one topic per "core" slide. If you think you need more slides to cover more topics or to amplify a topic, consider what effect it would have on your ability to stay within 5 minutes. Be careful not to spend too much time in the intro part of the presentation.

73, Chuck
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WA4IIF
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2010, 02:45:25 PM »

Wow, did I ever have a brain hiccup! Following my 2-minute rule would NOT allow you to have 10-12 slides for a 5-minute presentaion. I'm sorry for responding without my brain in gear. My basic concern is legitimate: using 20 slides for a 5-minute presentation would make it difficult for you to stay within the allowed time. For your purposes I'd plan for about one slide per minute or about five slides. You could have more slides if they were slides that required little or no comment on your part.

Good luck if you get picked to give the presentation.

73, Chuck
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K8DJK
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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2010, 03:22:40 PM »

Thanks for the tips!

If anyone has any thoughts on particular points I may want to include, please feel free to share!

The goal of these Ignite meetings is to get together, give a short presentation about a particular topic, and perhaps spur some discussion afterwards.

When you're dealing with shortened deliveries, as with Twitter, elevator pitches, or 5 minute presentations, you're forced to rethink what you're going to say, as well as what really is most important to the audience.

I can't expect the audience to want to know why AMSAT is totally awesome, or that our RACES members have to know what ICS courses. I think I'll be trying to relate (though not directly) what hams are up to with modern technology.

Please pass around the link to this thread or to the voting page itself, any and all help is greatly appreciated.

Cheers,
Andrew, K8DJK
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KASSY
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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2010, 03:28:52 PM »

1) You cannot Elmer 200 at once.  The Elmer process is one-on-one, hands-on, learn-by-doing.  Elmering is not:
- reading stuff on the internet
- writing stuff to post on the internet
- exchanging technical emails.

Elmering must first and foremost plant the notion that ham radio is primarily a people hobby and only secondarily a technical hobby and that must be done one-on-one.

2) 20 slides in 5 minutes is not Elmering.  It's not even a presentation.  It is phantasmagoria and will leave an audience utterly bewildered.

90 seconds to 150 seconds per slide.  At most, five bullets on the slide.  They must all speak to the same sub-topic.

3) I believe it has been demonstrated clearly that promoting ham radio primarily as a service to be used for emergency purposes is death to the hobby.  In 1993, with the new no-code tech license, we saw the biggest influx of hams ever in a single year.  In 2003, our roles dropped dramatically as 90% of these "in the door via the emergency comms route" hams let their licenses expire.

- k
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K8DJK
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« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2010, 03:55:57 PM »

I'm hoping that all 200 people will want more information from me, or actually ask me to help them get their ticket. It's high hopes, but the chance still exists. The bottom line is that doing this quick presentation makes it quite possible to bring new people into the hobby who would have otherwise never thought about it.

That's the point.
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W5HTW
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« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2010, 05:21:52 PM »

I hope you figure it out.  I would first of all get a rough presentation and present it in practice to a friend who is not a ham and who has no interest.  Or a spouse.  Someone not familiar with the hobby, which may leave a spouse out.  See if the presentation makes sense to that person, or gets them to ask a question.  If so, you may be on the right track.  

You are not "Elmering."  You are 'presenting' a program to people who, for the most part, will have no idea what you are talking about, and only two or three of that 200 will be curious enough to even pay attention.  You are 'introducing,' and expecting much return would be a bit over the edge.  In your five minutes you really can't cover enough about amateur radio to give anyone even an inkling of what it is, unless they already know.  

As already state, I would not go into the emergency communications aspects at all.  People with no understanding of amateur radio will get even more confused if they believe it is related to public safety (cops) radio.  I think the focus would be on the hobby and fun aspects of talking to people around the world.  A slide of a ham in the Netherlands, for example, at his radio, and you could mention he is talking to a ham in Ohio.  I'd also avoid any slides that depict large antennas!  No antennas at all.  I'd avoid slides that show cramped mobile installations.  Safety will immediately pop its head in your audience.  "How can he drive with all that junk in the car?  Worse than a dozen cell phones."  

You have a rough job!  Describing a 100 year old hobby with a thousand different aspects (or at least a hundred! ) in five minutes!  And to people who already have zero interest in it.  You have to 'hook' them with the very first slide and the very first comment.  And then not lose them with Slide #2.  

Good luck.  

Ed
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W5HTW
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« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2010, 05:25:00 PM »

Oh yes... you have to explain why this is NOT the Internet, Instant Messaging, CB radio, police radio, or iPods.  

Most of us can't do that here in 20 postings!  

Ed
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WD4ELG
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« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2010, 09:05:15 PM »

My suggestion is this...I read a great book by this Professor named Edward Tufte.  It was on the subject of how to present quantitative information via visual methods.  It changed my life...seriously.  I was a slide king, then I realized that I was not conveying my message with bullets on a PPT.  I started going with images and pictures and graphs and diagrams to get my points across.  20 slides in 30 minutes became 4 diagrams with key take-away points.  Wow, what a difference.
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K2DC
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« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2010, 11:29:02 AM »

Andrew,

   I've made hundreds of presentations over the last 25 years and I agree with many of the previous posts - 20 slides in 5 minutes will lose everybody in a hurry.  Anything more than about one slide a minute (not inclusing introduction and conclusion) is a pretty fast clip.  A few other ideas:

-  Use of pictures and graphics is key.  A slide full of bulletized text will just slow you down and make it difficult to get the point across simply.

-  Start with "What is Amateur Radio" (most of your audience may not have a clue).  A hobby that makes new friends, a place to talk to the World and promotes understanding between cultures, a hobby that promotes learning and experimenting.

-  Keep it extremely simple - very little technical information and no Ham jargon.

-  Agree that pictures of large towers and arrays may be a turn-off.  Pictures of elaborate shacks may also just ring $$ in everybody's eyes.  Think about ways one could start simply and inexpensively.

Good Luck with it.

73,

Don, K2DC
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AI7RR
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« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2010, 12:52:42 PM »

I'd say your best approach, given the time limit, would be not a slide presentation but a picture show. With a very brief introduction, provide many photos of ham radio in action. From an old timer rag-chew to Amsat and everything in between. Perhaps with minimal commentary during the show. Photos of highly recognizable personalities such as Walter Cronkite (SK) and photos of ham operators in crisis situations, i.e. Katrina, or hams in the Antarctica. There is something for most everyone in ham radio. Tell the story through pictures, plant the seed and then for those who are really interested, they'll come to you.

Good Luck, Roger
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K8DJK
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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2010, 03:35:03 PM »

Thank you all for the suggestions and support. This is the sort of discussion that I think 'Ignite' really stands for. The small time frame really does focus your energy on picking the few smart points you'll be able to make.

I've dropped down to 9th in the voting and only the top 7 get in, so I've got a little promotion (begging) to do before the voting ends on Monday.

I'm certainly going for the picture idea and my XYL, I love her dearly, is the perfect guinea pig for my presentation. If I can get her interested, I'll get anyone interested!

Thanks again and 73,
Andrew, K8DJK
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WD4ELG
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« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2010, 07:41:43 PM »

Let us know how it turns out
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KA2ODP
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« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2010, 10:23:19 AM »

Have you ever seen the short video clip on You Tube about Field Day 2008 by "Stormspotterkwp"?

Google "Amateur Radio Field Day 2008" or follow the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=varHL752Odk

In slightly over 2-minutes he outlines many aspects of Amateur Radio.  The video is very informative and great to watch.  Many folks do not know about the amateur radio station on board the International Space Station (ISS).

Perhaps this would help you with your slides.  Start with what the general public might think about Amateur Radio, then show them all the things we do today.
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K8DJK
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« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2010, 06:30:59 AM »

Thanks all the support that I've gotten. I need one last push today to make sure that I stay in the top 7!

If you could vote if you've not, or spread the link for others to vote, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks again and 73,
Andrew, K8DJK
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