Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: TX4T  (Read 579 times)
WB6RXG
Member

Posts: 73




Ignore
« on: February 23, 2010, 11:17:13 AM »

I've heard TX4T on 1.832 Mhz the last two nights at around 10:30pm PST (0630 GMT/UTC) at S9+ on my 80 ft vertical and TS-2000.  The first night he was sending CQ TX4T QRX 25.  On the second night he was sending CQ EU TX4T QRX 25 EU K.

I haven't made a CW contact in over 30 years due to being inactive for most of that time and I've never been a DX chaser.

My question is what did he mean by QRX 25, is he listening 2.5 khz up, 25 khz up or on 1.825?

Thanks,
Stuart
WB6RXG
Logged
WB6RXG
Member

Posts: 73




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2010, 12:12:23 PM »

I typoed that.  I mean't QSX 25.

Stuart
Logged
N3OX
Member

Posts: 8852


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2010, 01:02:39 PM »

In this case he meant 1825. 

I would say that usually if the number is bigger than about 5 or maybe 10 in a stupid pileup, and the "frequency interpretation" makes sense given the band plan, you should go with that interpretation.  I also think that "QSX 25" absolutely means they're listening on a frequency that ends in "25."  "UP 25" and "DN 25" are more ambiguous.

That said, one of my favorite DX moments was getting a DXPedition on 30m by one of the few people who caught the sudden switch to "UP 17," which was indeed up 17kHz.  VP6DX also kicked off their operation by calling CQ on 7002 with an "UP 25" that meant 7027.  Man, that was some ferocious dial spinning...

But I've also heard  "UP 25" to mean "UP, listening on 7025"

So to a certain extent if it's "UP" or "DN" and a big number, you just have to guess right or find the pileup.

73
Dan

Logged

73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
WX7G
Member

Posts: 5917




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2010, 02:13:05 PM »

You transmit on 1825 kHz. He transmits on 1831.5 kHz. When he says EU don't answer unless you are in Europe.

TX4T comes in quite well almost every night on 160 meters, so don't panic thinking this is a one time thing. Check the eham.net DX Cluster Spots (look to the left) to see when he is on. He is always on 1831.5 kHz when he's on the air.

160 meters has been good this season. I can work Europe from Utah running a 20 x 20 ft inverted-L. A fun band for sure.
Logged
WB6RXG
Member

Posts: 73




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2010, 03:31:08 PM »

Thanks for clarifying that.  

I've never actually copied a DX station on CW before and was suprised when I did.  My copy speed must be improving.  He wasn't making any contacts so there wasn't a pile up to listen for.

73,
Stuart
WB6RXG
Logged
N3OX
Member

Posts: 8852


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2010, 05:14:08 PM »

  He wasn't making any contacts so there wasn't a pile up to listen for.

Yeah, I think they've worked down the U.S. demand to a certain extent (I made a contact nearly two weeks ago)

The European guys couldn't hear TX4T much if at all last night.
Logged

73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
K5TN
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2010, 01:31:00 PM »

Stuart---
Methinks if I had access to an 80 foot vertical, I'd be on 160 when the sun went down....every night!!
;-)

Wade  K5TN
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!