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Author Topic: Extra Test bewilderment  (Read 5688 times)
KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #15 on: March 13, 2010, 03:59:18 PM »

I wonder how many of these old men complaining about how much better and harder the test was "back then" could repass a driving test today.

That would be a fun one to watch.

I'll take that bet. 

But just to make it real fun, let me add the stipulation that, after passing the written driving test, we both have to do the actual driving part while working CW mobile DX at the same time, kid. 

Oh, and I bet the rent money. 


KE3WD said that. 

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W7ETA
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Posts: 2527




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« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2010, 04:03:13 PM »

"I love these short sighted old man rants.."

Me too!

Nothing like someone stepping up to the plate, calling names, and then backing up his pejorative thinking with asymetric arguments.
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WX7G
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Posts: 6197




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« Reply #17 on: March 13, 2010, 05:55:20 PM »

KE3WD, I work mobile CW and could pass a driving test while doing so.

Yes things change and what we need to know as hams changes. Draw a schematic as part of the FCC test? In the old days of largely homebrew, Yes. Today, why?

Know about satelites, SSB, PSK, and other digital modes? In the old days, no. Today, yes.

I see there are as many CW questions on the 2010 Amateur Extra test as there are digital mode questions. If no keyboarding test for digital then no receiving test for CW.

Incidentally, CW was the first digital mode. The prime difference is that the coding and decoding was done manually while with new digital modes they are done automatically.

Which mode is older? Voice or Code?
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N3OX
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Posts: 8847


WWW

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« Reply #18 on: March 13, 2010, 07:34:08 PM »

Driving and DXing?

I propose we not be satisfied with anything less than simultaneous victory in the Daytona 500 AND CQWW RTTY WPX...





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73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
N3XP
Member

Posts: 80




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« Reply #19 on: March 13, 2010, 08:10:33 PM »

Daytona?  It's all left turns, and that is not tough.  Lets up the stakes and make it winning CQWW and winning the Monaco GP, while wearing an eye patch.
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N2EY
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Posts: 3909




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« Reply #20 on: March 14, 2010, 09:15:52 AM »


Yes things change and what we need to know as hams changes. Draw a schematic as part of the FCC test? In the old days of largely homebrew, Yes. Today, why?

Know about satelites, SSB, PSK, and other digital modes? In the old days, no. Today, yes.

I see there are as many CW questions on the 2010 Amateur Extra test as there are digital mode questions. If no keyboarding test for digital then no receiving test for CW.

Incidentally, CW was the first digital mode. The prime difference is that the coding and decoding was done manually while with new digital modes they are done automatically.

Which mode is older? Voice or Code?

Couple of points....

1) Drawing schematics as part of the written test ended in the early 1960s as FCC went to all-multiple-choice written exams.

Some of us still homebrew, though. And unlike practically all other radio services, US hams can all homebrew, and in fact are encouraged to. So some familiarity with schematics makes sense.

2) As for satellites, SSB, PSK and other digital modes, the first amateur satellites went up in the early 1960s.

SSB was first used by hams in the 1930s, became popular with hams in the 1940s-50s, and by the 1960s was prominent in the exams - along with AM and FM voice modes.

PSK and other digital modes either did not exist or US hams were not allowed to use them until the early 1980s. But there were RTTY and FSK questions on the 1975 exams.

btw, the 1970s repeater rules for hams were much more complex and involved than today. Repeaters had special calls and required a special application to FCC, including things like HAAT calculations. Test questions too.

3) CW is much more popular in ham radio than digital modes. For just one example, note how many CW QSOs were made in recent Field Days compared to all digital modes combined. Both count for the same points, and with modern rigs and laptops portable digital operation isn't all that complicated.

4) Keyboarding is a sending skill. Reading is the equivalent receiving skill. FCC stopped giving Morse Code sending tests for ham licenses more than 30 years ago.

There is still a reading test - I don't think someone who is illiterate can get an amateur license. Of course a blind person can't read a printed test, so there are accomodations, same as there were accomodations for deaf hams in the Morse Code tests.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




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« Reply #21 on: March 16, 2010, 06:30:28 PM »

Driving and DXing?

I propose we not be satisfied with anything less than simultaneous victory in the Daytona 500 AND CQWW RTTY WPX...

Nah. 

Autocross. 

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AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1581




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« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2010, 02:04:35 PM »

Jee-sus Christ! Why is it that the majority of threads on eHam degenerate into pissing-and-moaning contests. If this was the NRA you would all be lining up in a corn field to take shots at the other side. Then, 20 minutes later the survivors would line with with different criteria and shoot at the person who was standing next to you earlier.

Ok, here are the divisions;

1. No-code vs. code
2. Old-timers vs. newbies
3. Easy tests vs. hard tests (you decide which one)
4. Verticals vs. dipoles vs. beams
5. Coax vs. Ladder line
6. CW vs. PSK
7. Tubes vs. transistors vs. microprocessors

I think that by now, most hams are adults and should learn how to behave like adults. I experience better behavior when dealing with the 11 year old down the block on the 2 meter repeater. If your children or your grandchildren behaved like this you would shellac their behinds.

We wonder why people just don't connect with our hobby? Maybe it's because so many of us behave like asses.

Don't even bother responding to my post. It is not worth following this one. I made the mistake of "thinking" that the title had "something" to do with the real world.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
KI4NCX
Member

Posts: 20




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« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2010, 05:30:37 PM »

The older I get, The better I was. 06 newbie.

KI4NCX
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N3XP
Member

Posts: 80




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« Reply #24 on: March 19, 2010, 02:29:47 PM »

Don't forget the ecomm debates of late.
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KC5MO
Member

Posts: 36




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« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2010, 11:16:47 AM »

Take it with a slide rule;)You had to take it in front of the FCC in 1975 and you couldn't study via a computer.

Herb
KC5MO
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3909




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« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2010, 12:34:08 PM »

Take it with a slide rule;)You had to take it in front of the FCC in 1975 and you couldn't study via a computer.


Slide rule? Didn't have one when I took my exams in 1967, 1968 and 1970. Novice to Extra. Didn't need it.

(cue Four Yorkshiremen video)

73 de Jim, N2EY
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AE5MW
Member

Posts: 5




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« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2010, 06:14:45 PM »

Go to any local auto repair shop and find a certified master technician that can repair a vehicle that has no computer or eletronic ignition. Times have changed wether we like it or not. By the way I have seen a few mechanics that have never seen ignition points!

 Just my 2 cents and yes I am a mechanic that can do both old and new.
 73 Mike
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3909




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« Reply #28 on: March 29, 2010, 08:01:49 PM »

Go to any local auto repair shop and find a certified master technician that can repair a vehicle that has no computer or eletronic ignition. Times have changed wether we like it or not. By the way I have seen a few mechanics that have never seen ignition points!


I'm not sure what you're trying to say.

Cars pretty much stopped using points and carburetors 30 years or so ago. They had to, in order to meet economy and pollution requirements. As a side benefit, they need much less maintenance.

Amateur Radio, OTOH, is very different. You won't find many people driving cars 30 years old, but there are plenty of 30 year old ham rigs still in use.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




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« Reply #29 on: March 29, 2010, 08:26:27 PM »

Me, filling out a customs form, stating I'm mailing used glass tubes to a ham in Japan.

Clerk, "Why would you mail used glass tubes to anyone?"  

Me, "These are the glow in the dark vacuum tubes."

Clerk, with a puzzled look, "Do you want insurance or delivery confirmation?"

73
Bob
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