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Author Topic: How to Disassemble Icom-type, molex, six pin, power connectors.  (Read 6857 times)
N1AUP
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Posts: 15




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« on: June 16, 2010, 03:18:39 AM »

I own an Icom 730.  This radio uses the molex-type, six pin, power cables.  

The person who built my radio cut one of the 110 volt power wires that turns the remote power supply on and off short when assembling the connector.  Since it's nearly impossible to remove the connector from the radio by grasping same, you end up pulling on the cable itself.  The shortened wire meant that all of the pulling force was focused on one wire, which eventually broke the conductor.

I did not want to buy a whole new connector.  I just wanted to remove the one pin, and re-solder the wire.  I asked around various web sites, and pretty much got very vague answers on how to remove the pin.  People suggested I'd find the pin removal tool at Radio Shack, but no one there knew what I was talking about.  Worse, no one seemed to know the size of the pins, so that I could find the right tool.  Icom services techs were just as vague.

After four months of putzing around, I finally succeeded.  This is how I did it.



Go to your local hobby store - the kind that sells, remote control cars, balsa wood, model rockets, etc.  Buy a piece of brass tubing.  1/8 by .014 round (3.18 mm by .355 mm for metric fans out there).  The one I bought was made by K&S Engineering, and was stock #127.  UPC code is 14121 10127.  This piece is cheap - maybe a buck or two.

Once you get it home, take a Dremel tool with a cutting disk attached.  This disk is the carbide disk that fits in a chuck, and is approximately 3/4 of an inch in diameter.  The disk is used to cut metal.  

Carefully cut a 1/2 inch long slot, lengthwise in the tubing, starting at the very end.  You'll end up with a C shaped piece of metal if you're viewing the tubing from the end.

Measuring from the sliced end, cut the tubing off, making the entire length of the tubing maybe 1 - 1.5 inches long.  You want it long enough to be able to grasp it for removal from the Icom connector, but short enough that you can insert an appropriately sized nail into the inside of the brass tube to drive out the Icom pin (kind of like a syringe plunger going into a syringe barrel).

Using an electrical punch (used for making screw holes in wood or scribing lines), carefully flare out the inside diameter of the tubing.  Flare it big enough so that it fits over the metal pin in the Icom connector, but not so large that it won't fit in the plastic connector hole that contains the pin.  Flare deep enough into the brass tube so that the flared brass tube can take the entire length of the Icom metal pin into the inside of the brass tube.  

Carefully insert the flared end of the tubing into the hole containing the pin that you want to remove from the Icom connector.  Be firm, but gentle.  It won't take a ton of force to get it in if you did things right.  

Note:  There are two tiny tabs on the Icom metal pin that keep it from sliding out of the plastic connector shell.  Be sure that the metal of the brass tube is over these pins (and compressing them in).  Don't arrange it so that the cut, open slot of the flared brass tube sits over any pin (otherwise the tab won't get compressed).

The flared brass tube will now be inside of the plastic shell, surrounding the metal pin, and compressing the clips holding the pin to the shell.

Take a two inch nail that will slide into the brass tube from the non-flared end.  Cut off the pointy end of the nail, and stick the cut off end into the brass tube.  Press down, forcing the Icom pin out of the plastic shell.  The pins slide out in the direction toward where the wires enter the Icom connector.

Carefully remove the brass, flared tube from the connector.  You might need to use a pair of pliers.

Carefully remove the broken strands of copper wire from the pin.  Solder the wire back to the pin, insulate with electrical tape, and then carefully re-insert the wire and pin back into the Icom connector.  I chose to add 1 inch of length to the formerly broken wire so that there would be no more stress placed on this one conductor.

Repair accomplished!

Here are links to photos of the tools, the punch and the tubing.

http://i645.photobucket.com/albums/uu176/cshustak/Ham%20Radio/dremeldisk.jpg

http://i645.photobucket.com/albums/uu176/cshustak/Ham%20Radio/IMG_0294.jpg

http://i645.photobucket.com/albums/uu176/cshustak/Ham%20Radio/IMG_0295.jpg



« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 03:28:33 AM by Chris S. » Logged
KU5Q
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Posts: 90


WWW

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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2010, 06:22:18 PM »

I own an Icom 730.  This radio uses the molex-type, six pin, power cables.  

The person who built my radio cut one of the 110 volt power wires that turns the remote power supply on and off short when assembling the connector.  Since it's nearly impossible to remove the connector from the radio by grasping same, you end up pulling on the cable itself.  The shortened wire meant that all of the pulling force was focused on one wire, which eventually broke the conductor.

I did not want to buy a whole new connector.  I just wanted to remove the one pin, and re-solder the wire.  I asked around various web sites, and pretty much got very vague answers on how to remove the pin.  People suggested I'd find the pin removal tool at Radio Shack, but no one there knew what I was talking about.  Worse, no one seemed to know the size of the pins, so that I could find the right tool.  Icom services techs were just as vague.

After four months of putzing around, I finally succeeded.  This is how I did it.



Go to your local hobby store - the kind that sells, remote control cars, balsa wood, model rockets, etc.  Buy a piece of brass tubing.  1/8 by .014 round (3.18 mm by .355 mm for metric fans out there).  The one I bought was made by K&S Engineering, and was stock #127.  UPC code is 14121 10127.  This piece is cheap - maybe a buck or two.

Once you get it home, take a Dremel tool with a cutting disk attached.  This disk is the carbide disk that fits in a chuck, and is approximately 3/4 of an inch in diameter.  The disk is used to cut metal.  

Carefully cut a 1/2 inch long slot, lengthwise in the tubing, starting at the very end.  You'll end up with a C shaped piece of metal if you're viewing the tubing from the end.

Measuring from the sliced end, cut the tubing off, making the entire length of the tubing maybe 1 - 1.5 inches long.  You want it long enough to be able to grasp it for removal from the Icom connector, but short enough that you can insert an appropriately sized nail into the inside of the brass tube to drive out the Icom pin (kind of like a syringe plunger going into a syringe barrel).

Using an electrical punch (used for making screw holes in wood or scribing lines), carefully flare out the inside diameter of the tubing.  Flare it big enough so that it fits over the metal pin in the Icom connector, but not so large that it won't fit in the plastic connector hole that contains the pin.  Flare deep enough into the brass tube so that the flared brass tube can take the entire length of the Icom metal pin into the inside of the brass tube.  

Carefully insert the flared end of the tubing into the hole containing the pin that you want to remove from the Icom connector.  Be firm, but gentle.  It won't take a ton of force to get it in if you did things right.  

Note:  There are two tiny tabs on the Icom metal pin that keep it from sliding out of the plastic connector shell.  Be sure that the metal of the brass tube is over these pins (and compressing them in).  Don't arrange it so that the cut, open slot of the flared brass tube sits over any pin (otherwise the tab won't get compressed).

The flared brass tube will now be inside of the plastic shell, surrounding the metal pin, and compressing the clips holding the pin to the shell.

Take a two inch nail that will slide into the brass tube from the non-flared end.  Cut off the pointy end of the nail, and stick the cut off end into the brass tube.  Press down, forcing the Icom pin out of the plastic shell.  The pins slide out in the direction toward where the wires enter the Icom connector.

Carefully remove the brass, flared tube from the connector.  You might need to use a pair of pliers.

Carefully remove the broken strands of copper wire from the pin.  Solder the wire back to the pin, insulate with electrical tape, and then carefully re-insert the wire and pin back into the Icom connector.  I chose to add 1 inch of length to the formerly broken wire so that there would be no more stress placed on this one conductor.

Repair accomplished!

Here are links to photos of the tools, the punch and the tubing.

http://i645.photobucket.com/albums/uu176/cshustak/Ham%20Radio/dremeldisk.jpg

http://i645.photobucket.com/albums/uu176/cshustak/Ham%20Radio/IMG_0294.jpg

http://i645.photobucket.com/albums/uu176/cshustak/Ham%20Radio/IMG_0295.jpg



The Fry's Electronics here in the DFW Metroplex of North, Texas sells many types of molex connectors, contacts and the tools to crimp the contacts. They also sell an extraction tool AMP P/N 305183 that will work fine for extracting the contacts that are used in the MOLEX connector used for input DC power for the PROIII, 910H, 706. That same molex style connector is used on other brands too.

I have three large tool box drawers full of numerous electrical connector contact extraction tools, and crimp tools from AMP, Bendix, Daniels, Winchester Electronics that I've accumulated over many years from commercial aircraft electrics/electronics, and mechanical maintenance work. I was surprised to see the AMP P/N 305183 extractor there at Fry's for $3.00 so I bought a couple. These tools were meant to extract the 66105-4 type (and other similar) contacts used in the M-Series and other connectors made by AMP. However, they will also work extracting the contacts from the molex type connectors I mentioned.

Good that you were successful, but four months trying to find your solution is a long time. How many hours did you spend in those four months to find that solution?  

Again no disrespect to you, and good that you found a solution.

Molex connectors are never my first choice for anything I make for myself, but I understand why they would be okay for non-critical cheap hobby application in ham radio. I've fixed quite a few of these for friends that couldn't.

« Last Edit: June 17, 2010, 03:25:09 AM by Terry L. Perry » Logged
K1DA
Member

Posts: 525




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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2010, 07:05:04 AM »

Insert a small flat screwdriver on each side of the pin to compress the tabs and then pull gently on the wire or push on the pin.  Works every time.   
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KU5Q
Member

Posts: 90


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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2010, 05:56:09 PM »

Insert a small flat screwdriver on each side of the pin to compress the tabs and then pull gently on the wire or push on the pin.  Works every time.  

>Works everytime<

Only if the lock splays can be depressed enough to not interfere with the stop of the connector body. Most of the time they do.

Absolute circumferential compression of the contact  lock splays will assure they can be removed.It would be difficult for many to execute with a pick and you know that.

However, if you're facile and, can work the contact through the imperfect circle in the termination point/connector body, and also have depressed the lock splays enough, sometimes you have fortune and the contact can be removed, and the connector and contact can be repaired/serviced/replaced, and the article it supports restored to original service capacity.

One thing that fascinates me about amateur radio and it's core of peers, is that you will experience many abject, surreal, and contradictory ideas about RF technology, its relatives, and even the way to best use it.

Amateur Radio is technology and more. Much more!

One thing you will find in intense abundance is the variety of convictions, philosophies, and set reality in most things of the world.....but as a licensed Radio Amateur.

But we are a slice of society.

Many thanks to the access to life in a very old practiced technology.

Ham radio will die when we all die.

Nobody knows when that will be.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2010, 05:57:47 PM by Terry L. Perry » Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20633




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« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2010, 07:05:09 PM »

Molex actually sells the pin extractor tool for about $1.

That's what I use.
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KU5Q
Member

Posts: 90


WWW

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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2010, 07:47:42 PM »

Molex actually sells the pin extractor tool for about $1.

That's what I use.

So in your attempt to "one up" everyone, whats the P/N?

Checked with the FAA Airman Certification Branch, in OKC. You have never had a pilots rating of any kind. What else are you bull$hitting us about?
« Last Edit: June 17, 2010, 07:55:04 PM by Terry L. Perry » Logged
K7KBN
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Posts: 2825




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« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2010, 11:52:26 AM »

 http://www.lmgtfy.com/?q=why+don%27t+people+use+Google

Over 10,000 hits by Googling   molex pin extractor   .

...including http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062447&camp=PPC%3AGoogle%3ACablesPartsConn%3APhrase

73
Pat K7KBN
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20633




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« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2010, 02:31:33 PM »

Those are probably fine, but Molex sells their own extractors as well (a lot of them, depending on the pin size).

The list of P/N's is here: http://www.molex.com/pdm_docs/ats/ATS-011030006.pdf

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W4USC
Member

Posts: 3




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« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2010, 07:52:55 PM »

IF it was put together by MFJ ~~~your screwed Angry.
 Yank it out and start over. I HAVE BEEN THERE !!!!!!!
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20633




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« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2010, 09:08:10 PM »

IF it was put together by MFJ ~~~your screwed Angry.
 Yank it out and start over. I HAVE BEEN THERE !!!!!!!

Not sure about the MFJ reference, but Molex is the largest interconnection company in the world.  There probably isn't a computer, or an automobile anywhere in the world that doesn't use their connectors.

Actually, they "invented" many of the connectors we use every day, including the ones that plug into your disk drives and mother boards.
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