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Author Topic: New Radio and power supply, how much space? Also Power poles?  (Read 2817 times)
KF7LDW
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Posts: 33




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« on: July 08, 2010, 02:03:52 PM »

New ham here (obviously by the number of posts...).  Anyway just got my new Yaesu FT-8800 for use as a base and matched it up with a Samlex SEC 1235M power supply.  I really want to mount them both in a Tac-Comm rack, with the power supply on the bottom and the radio mounted to the top of the plate.  This would leave about .80 between the power supply and the radio for breathing room.  The PS doesn't have any vents on the top only sides.  I just thought the Tac-Comm rack would make a very efficient use of space for a semi portable setup, similar to and emcomm setup.

Also the radio came with a ungodly amount of power cable for a mobile install and I saw the hot side is fused twice.  I would really like to just cut the wires off the radio and install Anderson PP's with 15amp fuses to run to the power supply.  I don't really see a need for double fusing with the power supply as well.  I like the ATC prebuilt ones and again this would make for a very clean install.

Any opinions would be appreciated.  I've tried reading as much as I can on this stuff but electronics was never my strong suit.  I just don't want to melt anything. 

Thanks
KF7LDW
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6061




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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2010, 07:04:21 PM »

The double fusing is really only needed in a mobile installation.  Running the radio off a power supply for a home shack really doesn't need it.  BUT---  (You knew that was coming, didn't you)  If you intend one day to mount the radio in your mobile and wire the connections directly to the battery, you will need that second fuse.  And you should wire directly to the battery, especially in newer cars where the car wiring is small gauge wire.

What I would suggest is what I do to my rigs.  Cut the power leads about ten to twelve inches long and install your power poles.  Put the long power harness (with the dual fuse holders still on it) in the box for your radio along with the other parts you won't need.  Get a fuse holder with ten gauge leads and a matching length of ten gauge wire and make your home power supply harness out of that.  This way, if you want to put the rig in your car, all you have to do is put power pole connectors on the long power harness, run the wires to the battery, connect everything up, and you'll be in business.  Make sure the fuses are near the car battery for the harness' and rig protection.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2010, 07:09:46 PM »

Whoops!  Forgot the question of how much space.

You will probably want enough space to have the radio in a convenient position and enough room to write.  I suggest an area about the size of a card table.  You'll have enough room to sit comfortably and have your rig on the table--and also a table lamp.  You'll also have enough room to write comfortably and room to have a manual or two for reference.

If you're planning a larger station in the future and have the room to kit it out now, you may want to consider a surplus desk, which can be had for $10 or $20 in a resale store or flea market.
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KF7LDW
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Posts: 33




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« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2010, 12:51:12 AM »

Yep that is what I was thinking on the PP.  I figure just install the APP's off the radio and plug in one of the premade fused setups like the 12ga 15amp ATC fuse into the power supply and problem solved.  Quick, easy and reconfigurable at will (such as running off a battery or adding additional things to my PS).

As far as space goes desk space isn't a concern, the question was combining both the FT8800 and the PS in one of the Tec-comm rack/boxes  http://www.tac-comm.com/ with only about an inch of space between the two for airflow.  I figure the powersupply on the bottom strapped in, add the optional top cover and mount the radio from the top.  I don't think either would be too over worked.  I picked the power supply based on the ability to upgrade or change radios without having to buy another, I think the 8800 only draws up to 8.5amps on trx but the PS is up to 30-35amps.

Thanks for the reply, I just like to bounce some things around before doing them.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2010, 05:04:01 AM »

"I saw the hot side is fused twice"

This isn't necessary, even in a mobile installation. In a mobile installation where you connect both the + and - leads directly to the battery, both the + and - leads should have a fuse right close to the battery. The - line fuse protects the radio in the event that you have a poor ground connection to the starter motor and heavy starter currents try to flow through the radio's ground connection.

Obviously there is no starter motor in your fixed station so the - lead fuse is not needed there.
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KF7LDW
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Posts: 33




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« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2010, 01:53:10 PM »

Thanks,

Still looking for feedback on the tac-comm cases?
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N2IK
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Posts: 220




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« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2010, 06:38:14 PM »

The Tac-Comm carriers seem like a well-made way to unitize a radio setup if you can afford them. But they are easy to use.

There are other options such as velcro  or screw the radio mount to the power supply; fasten the radio and power supply to a plywood carrier which can stow in a standard size box to travel( this appeared in a QST article few years back);fasten the radio and supply to a flat pallet that fits into a case. I have seen the Igloo swing top lunch coolers used for the case as well as wheeled suitcases, Plastic sport tote boxes and Halliburton and Pelican cases. Mounting radio, power supply batteries and such into a relay rack case or a toolbox are also popular alternatives. I have a WX2NJ designed "ARES Toolbox" that I built using his design. I use it every day as my FM 144/444 station. I like the features it incorperates. It is not too space efficient on the shelf, or protective of the radio in transit. But it was economical and I could build it in a weekend.

If I had it to do again I would not put the batteries in the same case. Too heavy. I do like having it all pre-wired and just hook up the antenna and start operating. Have only drilled with it  and take it to field day and public service events so far in 9 years. Never deployed it for Em Comm.

Google around for "WX2NJ ARES toolbox" and you will find what I used. Google around for Go-kits and Em Comm radio Boxes and you will find Yahoo Groups and lots of folk's handiwork, some of which cost a king's ransom on top of the equipment involved.

Good Luck es 73 de Walt N2IK
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W5LZ
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Posts: 477




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« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2010, 05:32:13 PM »

Minimum space between devices?  I think you jsut about have it already.  Adding a circulatin fan wouldn't be a bad idea.  Just out of curiosity, where are the air vents on the radio?
Paul
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