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Author Topic: Woodworkers...whadaya call this??  (Read 3787 times)
K3GM
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« on: May 29, 2010, 04:49:32 PM »

I'm building a new riser for my operating desk, this time centered around the PC monitor, not the radio.  I'm using 3/4" sanded birch plywood.  You can see the plywood laminations all along the thickness of the material.  Is there a roll of wood or plastic veneer that can be glued to the edge to hide the laminations?  What's that stuff called?
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W3LK
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« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2010, 06:58:24 PM »

Veneer edging. It's usually installed with a hot iron. Home depot, Lowes, etc carries the stuff.
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K3GM
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« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2010, 08:31:47 PM »

Thanks, Lon.  Apparently it's referred to often as edgebanding (one word).  A big box home on Memorial Day weekend....should be interesting!
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W3LK
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« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2010, 01:02:13 PM »

Thanks, Lon.  Apparently it's referred to often as edgebanding (one word).  A big box home on Memorial Day weekend....should be interesting!

It all depends upon who makes the particular stuff you are looking at. <gg>
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AA4PB
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« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2010, 01:42:11 PM »

You can also cover the edges with 1/2 round molding using finishing nails.
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W3LK
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« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2010, 07:14:55 PM »

You can also cover the edges with 1/2 round molding using finishing nails.


And it won't peel off. Smiley
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K8AC
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« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2010, 02:09:25 PM »

For the edge banding, it's a good idea to stop by Walmart and buy the cheapest iron you can find.  I know from experience that the XYL won't appreciate your using her iron for such projects.  By the way, I've been using the edging for at least 20 years and if you do it right, there's no chance of it ever coming off. 
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N2IK
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« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2010, 06:58:26 PM »

Another approach is to glue and nail a 3/4 by 1 1/2 good quality wood strip to the front and back edges of the shelf. The long side is vertical. Thus concealing the edges of the plywood and adding a lot of stiffness to the shelf.  I like the rear strip to be up a bit from the plywood to prevent things form getting pushed off the back edge fo the shelf accidently. Clear pine or birch, maple and oak are widely available in that dimension at home centers. You also can find wide laminated pine boards, folding closet doors, Butcher block panels, stair treads,and other materials that make fabulous shelves with modest work.

As someone else mentioned the Global Industrial catalog and McMaster Carr have a selection of workbenches that have risers and shelves and such things that can be used for ham benches and shelves. Some of this stuff is reasonably prices for the durability and function. It may or may not meet your aesthetic goals.

 
73 de Walt N2IK
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K3GM
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« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2010, 05:08:06 AM »

I decided to try the "iron on" edge banding.  I selected the unfinished oak veneer which can be found at Home Depot.  The material comes with a heavy coating of glue on one side.  I used a clothes iron set to "Cotton" as recommended.  I put a piece of aluminum foil between the iron's sole, and the material to prevent glue from sticking to the iron.  I was skeptical at first, but the veneer really "welded" itself to the edge of the plywood.  I lefe it cool, and removed any bits of visible glue with a razor blade.  The shelf was then painted charcoal grey.  Overall, the edge banding was easy to apply, and the result is much nicer than leaving the laminations show.

A picture of the completed shelf can be seen here:
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a96/TwoSevenRight/shelf.jpg
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