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Author Topic: Need some antenna ideas for new home  (Read 3003 times)
K4SKA
Member

Posts: 43




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« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2010, 07:29:48 AM »

From a lightning protection standpoint, You will want to some how bond your ground rod to your homes electric (And telco, Cable TV etc) grounds.   Also, It is better to have the feedline enter the building low to the ground.

My entry point for electric service is on the opposite corner of my house.  Do I have to run an underground wire, from my ground rod (Point X), all the way around my house to that entry point ground wire(Point Y)?
         ______
         |     X|
         |       |
         |       |
         |Y     |
         -------
What if I tied a wire from the ground point of a standard 3-prong house outlet back outside my window to the ground rod, or must it tie in to the ground point in my house service panel ?

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K5TEN
Member

Posts: 146


WWW

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« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2010, 05:08:55 PM »

An Alpha-Delta double sloper in that tree as high as you can get it with a #10 ground wire down to a ground rod and a few radials would be a low-band MONSTER!
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WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13281




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« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2010, 08:58:29 PM »

Quote from: KB4AZX

My entry point for electric service is on the opposite corner of my house.  Do I have to run an underground wire, from my ground rod (Point X), all the way around my house to that entry point ground wire(Point Y)?
         ______
         |     X|
         |       |
         |       |
         |Y     |
         -------


Yes.  It doesn't need to be buried, but a #6 wire around the perimeter of the house (by the shortest
practical route) is the standard approach.  You HAVE to be sure that, even with high currents flowing
(as would happen in the case of a lightening strike) there is no voltage difference between the
two ground rods.  Otherwise one "ground" point can be a few thousand volts different than the
other.  That is not good for equipment or the buildings and people near them.



Quote
What if I tied a wire from the ground point of a standard 3-prong house outlet back outside my window to the ground rod, or must it tie in to the ground point in my house service panel ?

Do you know how many splices there are in that wire between your panel and the outlet?  Or how
much current might try to flow down that wire?  Let's say your computer is plugged into the same
outlet.  The power wires are +/- 120V with respect to the power ground rod.  What happens if
the green (ground) wire to your computer suddenly jumps up hundreds of volts relative to the
hot and neutral wires due to added voltage drop on the green wire?  It's not pretty.
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K4SKA
Member

Posts: 43




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« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2010, 07:26:11 AM »

Good information, thanks for the explanation.
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