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Author Topic: Two meter am cw crystal controlled transmitter.  (Read 7872 times)
KC4ETW
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Posts: 19




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« on: July 07, 2010, 06:10:13 AM »

I need a schematic for a two meter cw am crystal controlled transmitter.The theory is that I would be able to cover most of the lower half of the state of South Carolina.Then publish the schematic in our local club paper so others can follow in order to have reliable cw communications in which to practise code with.The cw deli ma seems to be a common one with many amatures and to build your own transmitter would be a bit of nostalgia for so many.
 Anyone with any ideas or web sites would be greatly appreciated.
Kenneth
kc4etw
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20666




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« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2010, 09:07:42 AM »

If you're interested in "nostalgia," a great circuit to simply "copy" would be the old Ameco TX-62, which was a current product in the mid-to-late 1960s.  I owned two of these and they are actually very good transmitters.  The design covers 6m and 2m, although you could leave out the 6m components if you wish to make it single-band for 2m only, and runs about 35W output power with excellent AM modulation and very good keying characteristics on CW.

It uses six tubes, all of which are still available.

You can also find these on the used market in good working condition for less than $100; it might be fun to "buy" one as a "sample," and then use it as a model, along with the schematics and part lists from the manual, to build more of them!

You can download the manual, including complete schematics, here:  http://home.comcast.net/~aa4df02/tx62.htm

This is a zipped file, but it's not very big and downloads in just a few seconds.
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KC4ETW
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« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2010, 09:37:05 AM »

So I could simply purchase the Ameco TX-62 for two meters and acquire a crystal for the desired frequency and have at it?I did a search for the little transmitter and it looks really neat.Will my plan with code on two meters work with this little rig.Home brew can follow later on.
Thank you very much for your knowledge.
Kenneth
Kc4etw
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20666




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« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2010, 10:18:55 AM »

So I could simply purchase the Ameco TX-62 for two meters and acquire a crystal for the desired frequency and have at it?I did a search for the little transmitter and it looks really neat.Will my plan with code on two meters work with this little rig.Home brew can follow later on.
Thank you very much for your knowledge.
Kenneth
Kc4etw

Sure.  CW is allowed "anywhere" on the two meter band, but to be friendly to your fellow local hams, I'd keep it down below 144.200 MHz, where about 99% of the 2m CW activity actually is (to prevent interference to other users).  Bear in mind, to go along with your original post about a "transmitter," the TX-62 is just that: A transmitter.  You still need a receiver.
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KC4ETW
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« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2010, 10:48:37 AM »

What kind of receiver would be a suitable duo for the venerable Ameco transmitter.I am having fun with this.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2010, 09:58:18 AM »

What kind of receiver would be a suitable duo for the venerable Ameco transmitter.I am having fun with this.

Any HF receiver with a 2m converter in line ahead of it; that's what we all did back in the TX-62 era.  In fact, Ameco sold several "matching" receiving converters for 6m, 2m and 135cm, with I.F.s of 28 MHz and even 14 MHz (28 MHz is a better choice) for use with the TX-62.
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KC4ETW
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« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2010, 06:37:19 PM »

I will keep a close watch on Ebay
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N2EY
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Posts: 3926




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« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2010, 07:10:18 AM »

I need a schematic for a two meter cw am crystal controlled transmitter.The theory is that I would be able to cover most of the lower half of the state of South Carolina.Then publish the schematic in our local club paper so others can follow in order to have reliable cw communications in which to practise code with.The cw deli ma seems to be a common one with many amatures and to build your own transmitter would be a bit of nostalgia for so many.

Why 2 meters? Why not 80 or 40?

A decent 2 meter transmitter and receiver for CW (not MCW) that can reliably cover half of SC aren't simple/easy projects, and you need a lot more than a schematic to build one. A simple crystal controlled 80/40 meter CW rig and receiver are much simpler to build, and there are many examples around.

73 de Jim, N2EY

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N3QE
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« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2010, 09:11:51 AM »

If you are trying to introduce 2 meter users (sort of an implied "no code ham") to Morse Code, you should be interested in the unofficial Q-code "QCW", which stands for "I am going to whistle Morse on 2 Meter FM", and the corresponding "QCW?", which means "Why are you Whistling Morse?"

Tim.
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KC4ETW
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2010, 07:38:00 PM »

I have seen whistle keys on ebay.The reason for two meter code is for relability and the logistics of the antenna.An eighty meter antenna is an ungainly and huge affair and so many people struggle with an increasingly hostile antenna restrictions.A two meter cw rig would require as we all know an antenna roughly the size of a coat hanger.
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N2EY
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Posts: 3926




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« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2010, 07:52:08 PM »

The reason for two meter code is for relability and the logistics of the antenna.

If all you want to do is to use code on 2 meters, any FM rig can be made to do the job by feeding keyed audio into it. A lot simpler than building an entire 2 meter CW station.


An eighty meter antenna is an ungainly and huge affair and so many people struggle with an increasingly hostile antenna restrictions.

Then how will they get on the air once they know the code?

A two meter cw rig would require as we all know an antenna roughly the size of a coat hanger.

And how far will such an antenna permit them to communicate? Remember that on-off keyed CW won't go through an FM repeater.

---

I'm not trying to discourage anyone from using CW, 2 meters, or homebrewing. But building a 2 meter CW transmitter and receiver from scratch isn't a simple undertaking, particularly if you want more than a watt or two output.

73 de Jim, N2EY
« Last Edit: July 09, 2010, 07:53:54 PM by James Miccolis » Logged
KC4ETW
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2010, 05:17:00 AM »

I thought two meter am would do the trick and skip the repeaters and FM simply because alot of repeater users do not care to hear the code on the machine.
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KC4ETW
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2010, 08:05:16 AM »

A little am cw mabye a tube transmitter would be very rewarding.Have a statewide two meter am cw frequency.I seriously doubt any one else would be there so it would be like an intercom for the state cw enthusiasts.I have a feeling that a good many people would participate.CW has proven itself once again as the most dependable mode of communication universally known on a global scale.
KC4ETW
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2839




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« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2010, 02:24:07 PM »

From reading the first question, about a "two meter cw am" transmitter, I thought the subject was a radio that had the capability to transmit either amplitude modulated 'phone, or CW.  From what I'm now reading, it seems that the OP wants to use the AM mode to transmit Morse code tones keyed by an audio oscillator into the microphone or something similar to that.

"AM CW" is amplitude-modulated audio; it isn't CW.  CW involves turning the carrier on and off with a switch, or key.  And while true CW is allowed on every amateur band except 60M, AM is not, and it doesn't matter whether you're speaking into the microphone or sending Morse code, it's still AM. 

The same question has come up about keying Morse code tones into an FM HT, calling it "MCW", or "Modulated Continuous Wave".  It isn't; it's plain FM.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
KC4ETW
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #14 on: July 10, 2010, 04:19:24 PM »

a crystal controlled cw ten watt rig for the code section of the two meter ham band.Thats the ticket.
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