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Author Topic: Two meter am cw crystal controlled transmitter.  (Read 7383 times)
WB2WIK
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Posts: 20611




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« Reply #15 on: July 10, 2010, 05:48:31 PM »

2m CW, with operators using reasonable antennas, will cover a much larger area than MCW on FM will...probably nearly 10:1 larger area.

I work 2m CW all the time.  Typical contact is 350 miles or so, just using simple beams on both ends.  With a dipole, it would be less, maybe 150 miles.  But it beats the heck out of modulated CW and FM.

I worked Colorado on 2m CW a few weeks ago, that was 690 miles.  FM ain't gonna do that.

I think the op's idea has fantastic merit, if others will go along.  It's also a throwback to "the way things used to be," which isn't all bad. Wink
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2813




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« Reply #16 on: July 10, 2010, 10:16:22 PM »

a crystal controlled cw ten watt rig for the code section of the two meter ham band.Thats the ticket.

Thanks for the clarification.  I fully agree with Steve, WIK.  Pure CW on 2M can be a lot of fun. I use an IC-211 which has been with me for dang near 30 years and still works like brand new.

73
Pat K7KBN
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
N3QE
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Posts: 2285




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« Reply #17 on: July 11, 2010, 07:40:17 AM »

a crystal controlled cw ten watt rig for the code section of the two meter ham band.Thats the ticket.
Go read up. A keyed but unmodulated FM transmitter is in fact a CW transmitter. But like we've been telling you, the transmitter is not the problem. The issue is a quality receiver.

I don't have anything against VHF CW work - especially weak signal work, I got to experience EME a while back and wow, is that fun - but to suggest that this is a mode that you'll get a lot of people who currently are no-coders interested in, is doubtful.

You might want to just look for some older but still somewhat modern (aka Kenwood, Yaesu, Icom) SSB/CW VHF equipment on maybe ebay.

Unlike AM and FM, for SSB or true CW (as opposed to "whistling CW on 2 meter FM", I'm not sure you got the joke) you really need quite good stability.

Heathkit sold the HW-20 Pawnee a long time ago. You might want to find one of those on E-bay if you want to experience a kind of marginal 2M CW nostalgia. With a crystal for each channel the stability is not too awful. But to make a "copy" of the Pawnee today out of tube nostalgia? $1500-$2000 easy. Remember it was not a cheap radio ($200 back in the 60's). And what you'll end up is actually quite below marginal by modern standards, when $200 or so will get you a used quality CW/SSB 2 meter rig.

If you really want to do 2 meter CW and learn the ropes, you want some not too old but quality Japanese rig.

Yep, that's right, right here on Eham I recommend a ricebox rig over anything else. On 2M CW/SSB I don't think there's any other choice. The old 60's US-built cheapish ham tube stuff is nowhere near up to snuff, falling down really bad on both transmit stability and reception noise figure/intermod.
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KC4ETW
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2010, 01:46:33 PM »

If any one has a schematic for a crystal controlled cw two meter rig It would be greatly appreciated.
KC4ETW
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KC4ETW
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #19 on: July 11, 2010, 05:48:50 PM »

An all mode two meter rig should do the trick?Is it reasonable to do it that way.I do think it would be so much more fun to build a little transmitter but ultimately the goal is to become a good cw operator.One thing I noticed and so did some others in the Charleston Armature Radio Society,is that the CW mode made far more contacts than any one else during museum ship weekend.I think it is safe to say that CW is still the most reliable way to communicate by radio.None the less I wanted to take a second and thank everyone who took the time to answer my call here on eham.It is heartwarming to see people coming to my aid in the fraternity of Amature Radio.One of the good sides to life as we know it.
73,s KC4ETW
« Last Edit: July 11, 2010, 06:23:12 PM by kenneth ezell » Logged
KB9HV
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Posts: 3




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« Reply #20 on: July 11, 2010, 09:06:26 PM »

Only you can figure out what's reasonable.  All Mode VHF rigs are rather pricey, even for used equipment.

There are a few companies producing 2M transverter kits that you can use as the front end to an HF rig or you can find plenty of used ones around.  The modern kits have very good sensitivity to them.

FAR circuits ( www.farcircuits.net ) lists a PCB for "A SIMPLE 6 AND 2 METER CONVERTER BY KREUTER QST Jan97".   The original QST article was "Junk-Box Converters for 6 and 2 Meters".  If you are an ARRL member you can access the article from the ARRL website, just look in the QST archive section.  It is a fairly simple circuit to build.  If you can kit this up at a reasonable price and offer it to other hams in your area you may generate some interest.

Off the top of my head I don't know of any simple plans for what you are looking for.  You may just have to piece it together yourself.  The simplest of the HF circuits that I've seen is a direct conversion, crystal controlled circuit called the Pixie 2 or find another HF circuit that suits you.  From there just build it up in modules; multiplier stages to 2M, T/R switching, power amp, what have you...

Mac, KB9HV
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N2EY
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Posts: 3894




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« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2010, 03:30:10 PM »

I work 2m CW all the time.  Typical contact is 350 miles or so, just using simple beams on both ends.  With a dipole, it would be less, maybe 150 miles. 

With how much power and what receiver at both ends? Antennas at what heights? How reliable?

What the OP wants is *reliable* coverage of a considerable area using small antennas at low heights, 10 watts or so, and a simple receiver. At both ends.

I worked Colorado on 2m CW a few weeks ago, that was 690 miles.  FM ain't gonna do that.

Sure it can - with enough power and antennas behind it, during an opening. The Ancient Ones covered similar distances with AM decades ago. But it's much easier with CW, for a whole bunch of reasons.

I think the op's idea has fantastic merit, if others will go along.  It's also a throwback to "the way things used to be," which isn't all bad. Wink

I think there's more to it. The OP's whole reason for going to 2 meters is to use small, low antennas. We're talking coat-hanger-and-an-SO239-in-the-attic stuff. With 10 watts and a simple receiver, how much distance can such a station cover *reliably*? Because the setup is intended for hams with little or no CW skills to get started. 

73 de Jim, N2EY
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KC4ETW
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #22 on: July 12, 2010, 06:24:59 PM »

yes it would be a practise forum for hams who really want the pleasure of building a home brew rig combined with the practicality of cw.I thought cw was a dying art untill some really young hams in our club were caught playing with it.It would be great fun indeed for pennies on the dollar for the low budget ham who really wants to participate.I have a feeling that their are many people who want to participate but cannot because of the price of ham equipment.In short,use your head not your wallet.
KC4ETW
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KC4ETW
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #23 on: July 12, 2010, 06:26:27 PM »

A home brew rig that has simple stamped all over it kind of like a pixie two.Something dummy proof.A rig your mother could build and make work etc.
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KI4ENS
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Posts: 80




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« Reply #24 on: July 13, 2010, 02:07:04 PM »

A home brew rig that has simple stamped all over it kind of like a pixie two.Something dummy proof.A rig your mother could build and make work etc.

I was thinking maybe a simple 20 meter to 2 meter transverter.  Hook your Pixie, SW+,  Rockmite etc to it.    Use a NE602 mixer maybe?
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20611




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« Reply #25 on: July 13, 2010, 03:36:47 PM »

A home brew rig that has simple stamped all over it kind of like a pixie two.Something dummy proof.A rig your mother could build and make work etc.

I haven't been following well but I thought the idea was to use 2m CW for training and fun, but also to cover a large area with it, like your whole state (or most of it).

A solid state QRP rig won't do that on 2 meters.  If you want stations 100+ miles apart to be able to reliably contact each other via 2m CW, you'll need some power and beam antennas.  A couple of watts to a simple antenna might work from the summit of Mt. Mitchell but it won't work for where people actually live.
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KC4ETW
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #26 on: July 13, 2010, 09:27:35 PM »

I have consistantly thought that ten watts and a small beam would do the trick.However I am certain that many people would start off with whatever they could get their hands on.In my original post I have already benefited from the idea by virtue of learning that CW and AM are two different modes all togeather.Amplitude modulation and Continuious Wave.It never crossed my mind even after all the tests I had to take to get my license that CW and AM were not one and the same.A pixie two is dirt simple.Now if I could just get one in the two meter range and ten watts output I would have it made.
KC4ETW
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KC4ETW
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #27 on: July 15, 2010, 06:13:06 AM »

A transverter would be very neat because you would have an hf rig too
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