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Author Topic: Your Radio's Display: Callsign, Frequencie, or Location?  (Read 1506 times)
KC2KMJ
Member

Posts: 89




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« on: July 12, 2010, 04:57:29 PM »

This has always been a thing that bugs me. When you don't have enough spaces on your radio, particularly a portable, to enter what you want for that "channel". For example, on my Ericsson M-RK portable I use for 2m its channel display is max 8 digits. I used to have the location of the particular repeater for each channel (or freq pair) entered, (eg. "Greenbrook" since the rptr was located in Greenbrook) but then I switched it to the repeater's Rx frequency. Sometimes I'd forget where the repeater was and though I could hit it, I still wanted to know where that repeater was. Hence, I changed my channels back to listing each repeater's location.

So I'm curious what you guys enter for your repeater channels (freq pairs) in your radio's display.
--
73's
Tony
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W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




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« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2010, 10:25:50 PM »

After a while, you'll know the repeater by the output frequency you listen to.

The concept of a channel will vanish.

73
Bob
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W0FM
Member

Posts: 2057




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« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2010, 12:46:24 PM »

Yes.  You will quickly learn to recall the repeater location, club name, etc by the frequency.  I know where the ".85" repeater is installed, as well as the ".91" repeater, and the ".97" repeater.  If you want to condense "Greenbrook" into eight characters, I recommend that you contact a local youngster who does texting on their cell phone.  THEY have an abbreviation for EVERYTHING.  ;O)

73,

Terry WØFM

« Last Edit: July 13, 2010, 12:48:22 PM by Terry Schieler » Logged
N0ZNA
Member

Posts: 115




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« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2010, 12:41:44 PM »

Yes,after awhile you will memorize what freq is what.I dont use the alpha numeric on my radios...its cool looking,but never use them.73s de N0ZNA/John
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KB1LKR
Member

Posts: 1898




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« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2010, 08:56:46 PM »

To condense long names start by dropping all vowels, e.g. Greenebrook becomes GRNBRK.
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KC9PTB
Member

Posts: 3




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« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2010, 09:00:20 PM »

I travel alot and several repeaters overlap frequency pairs with different PLs and a few hundred miles between them, plus I just moved so there's a little learning the area going on.  As some towns have 8 repeaters per band in them I've take to splitting the city (similar and when available matching with airport call letters) in two or three letters followed by the first 3 numbers following the decimal point.  For example my current local repeater is ID tagged as MAN610 and I've got a nearby GRB120 and before I moved I almost always listened to a repeater I have tagged as MCH410.  It makes it easy to pass along the frequency without having to fumble with microphone buttons (important while driving) and helps make it easy to learn .85 .91 and .97s out there while still not leaving me goofing it up and trying to put out my call on a repeater that I'm nowhere near.  It also helps me figure out what I'm hearing when I've got about half the state's active 2m repeaters programmed in. 

Simplex stuff is all frequency only display. With the exception of national calling channels those are labeled 2MCALL and 70CM-C and I've got an APRS-C for a tone squelched 144.39 PL100.0 as suggested by the ARRL APRS book, never heard anyone on it but it's supposed to be a good alternate method of being able to reach other hams you may see on the road though it certainly wouldn't be my first choice.

So that sums up what works for me.
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