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Author Topic: Small car hf moible installation questions  (Read 4521 times)
KC9RXE
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Posts: 14




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« on: September 01, 2010, 02:55:34 PM »

I am a new general class licencee and I am looking for some recomendations from my mobile instalation. I have a small car a Cavailer that I'll be working on. I am trying to get the best installation I can with the least cost because I have extream restrictions in my condo both from the assoiation and the room mates, non hams. I am seriously looking at a ic-7000 as the transiever. I am not afraid to spend money on it but I dont want to throw money away on extra stuff or less than ideal products. What tuners and antanne do you recomend  for my situation.

Mike
KC9RXE
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K0BG
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« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2010, 03:13:42 PM »

Well, spend some time on my web site. You never know what you might find.
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KC9RXE
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« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2010, 01:31:10 PM »

Thanks for the web site there is a lot of good information and I'll spend some time there. However I didn't see any product recommendations. That is what I am seeking so that I can further my research before I make my final decision. I would like to do a screwdriver but I am not sure about the mount mostly because I can't lay it down it will have to be removed constantly negating the convenience for the antenna. Please let me know if I have the wrong idea.
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WX7G
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2010, 07:04:58 PM »

The Hustler quick disconnect takes but a second to remove your mobile antenna. DX Engineering stocks this item.
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K0BG
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« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2010, 07:22:08 AM »

The first thing you have to decide on, is just how much performance you want. Hamsticks will garner you a lot of contacts, and fun in the process. They aren't too expensive either, and they're easy to install.

However, if you go with the likes of a Scorpion 680, you're ease of installation goes out the window, along with the low cost. The performance difference between the two is rather impressive, but so is the price.

I'm not fond of the Hustler QD. Over time they get rather floppy, and the connection they make isn't all that good, especially when used at the base. You might want to look at the Breedlove QD. I'm not sure I'd use one at the base to hold up a screwdriver, but they're great for Hamsticks.
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KC9RXE
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« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2010, 05:30:37 AM »

Thanks I will look into the Breadlove QD. I believe I will at least start with a hamstick with this being my first hf mobile installation. I am already expection to have to make a custom bracket for the antenna because the roof isn't going to be strong enough to support a large antenna at 70mph and mag mount on the trunk deck while convenient isn't the best way to go. So it is looking like a "frame" mounted bracket going around the plastic bumper.
Is there a tuner that works better as a mobile than others? I have seen lots of mixed reviews and am a little confused.
Mike
KC9RXE
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K0BG
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« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2010, 06:49:33 AM »

Tuner whip combinations aren't all that great performance wise. Owen Duffy, VK1OD, is currently working on a web page about this very subject. His preliminary findings aren't too encouraging, especially on 80 and 40. Even stainless steel whips become lossy enough to have a great effect on efficiency.

As for the frame bracket; they undoubtedly increase ground losses. When you low mount an HF antenna, a goodly portion of the return current is forced to flow through the lossy surface under the vehicle, rather than through the less lossy superstructure of the vehicle. This is especially true when you mount the antenna atop a post jutting from a frame mount. The rule of thumb is, it's the mass under the antenna which counts, not that along side.
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W9PMZ
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« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2010, 06:53:41 AM »

just my opinions:

having had an ic-7000 and am ic-706mkiig, unless you are feeding the video of the ic-7000 into a dash display i'd go with the ic-706mkiig.  the ic-7000 gets washed out in bright light too easy.  i've gone back to the ic-706mkiig; easy to see even in bright light.  besides all the dsp controls are pretty much useless when going 65mhp on the ic-7000; no time to look down and twiddle the knobs.  $ for $ the ic-706mkiig is probably one of the best hf mobles i've used.

on antennas, if your goal is 40m and 75m your better off with a hustler and resonators than the hamstick; unless you plan to go with a screwdriver later.  the hustler scheme is not all that more expensive than hamsticks.  

73,

carl - w9pmz
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WA8FOZ
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Posts: 190




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« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2010, 08:18:10 PM »

IMHO:
1. DEFINITELY go woth the Breedlove ball mount, and get the base plate. Mount this to the rear quarter panel (look at my installation on the k0bg.com site). This will absolutely be the most electrically efficient thing you can do (best image plane possible), and will be mechanically solid enough for anything in the future. This is an easy installation: drill five holes(one 5/8", four 5/16") - if you don't want to do it, a body or 2-way shop can do it easily. And it looks nice.

2. Want to start out with hamsticks? Fine, especially on 20m and above. Then you can move up to better things, even a screwdriver - the mount will hold it.

     Like you, I need to be able to take my antenna down and stow it. I used a MFJ "manual screwdriver"(MFJ 1668) for a while - easy to stow, a bit better than hamsticks on the lower bands. Now I have a "bugcatcher": 2-foot mast and 10-inch by 4-inch coil, then a 6-foot whip with a quick-disconnect at its base. It breaks down into two pieces that can be stowed in the back seat or trunk. My family thinks its ugly, but, heck, it's MY car - and the antenna really works well! But I still had fun with the hamsticks, and I can always put them back on, if the family complain enough!

     Have fun!

73,
Bill WA8FOZ
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AB2T
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Posts: 246




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« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2010, 09:02:23 AM »

A car can be used as a support for a portable station. 

You could put an antenna mount on the car but not mount the rig in the car.  Antenna wind load issues aren't a big deal when you're operating from a card table near the car with coax running from the rig to an antenna on a car mount.  Also, portable operating with a stationary car allows you to attach radials to the vertical etc.  Also, using your car as an antenna platform for a portable station allows you to operate CW, PSK, and other modes that are difficult or dangerous to undertake while driving.  (yeah, I know some hams send CW while driving.  But I have to be sitting down to send code.)

Portable operation with a stationary car offers the ability to create more sturdy and efficient antennas that don't need to survive overhangs, parking garages, or any place where cars and low clearances come together.

73, Jordan 

   
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