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Author Topic: WWVA in Wheeling, WV. All 3 towers down from a bad storm @ 8/4/2010.  (Read 7268 times)
K3ANG
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Posts: 179




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« on: August 07, 2010, 05:48:38 AM »

http://www.radioworld.com/article/104490.
WWVA is back on the air at 5kW on a longwire temporarily.
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WG8Z
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Posts: 200




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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2010, 05:43:58 PM »

Since when is a 3/8W inverted L considered a LONGWIRE?
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N0RHA
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2010, 01:05:14 AM »

Ouch! must have been one serious storm to have taken those beasts down!

Back in the '70s when my dad worked at WWVA, I got a chance to take a tour of the transmitter and tower site. As a kid I remember being a bit awestruck looking up at the towers. It's a bit sad, and yet morbidly fascinating, to see the twisted remains in the video.  Undecided

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W5RB
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Posts: 564




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« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2010, 03:01:56 AM »

Here's a video walk-through of the aftermath .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5ByhpBFriM
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12891




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« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2010, 05:27:56 AM »

So much for the theory that towers always twist and wind up in a pile near the base. It looks like these just folded at the base and toppled over.
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W5RB
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Posts: 564




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« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2010, 07:55:18 AM »

So much for the theory that towers always twist and wind up in a pile near the base. It looks like these just folded at the base and toppled over.


That is the normal failure mode for guyed towers . These were self-supporters , around 400 feet tall . The fact that they all broke at pretty much the same instant , and fell the same direction ,  suggests that there was a tremendous wind gust . This is unprecedented as far as I know , and deserves some serious study .
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20611




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« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2010, 08:53:55 AM »

I'm astonished 400' self-supporting towers appeared to be fabricated from angle stock for the legs.

All the BC SS towers I've seen around here use tubular legs; even the medium-duty Rohn SSV starts out with 5" diameter pipe legs at the base (20' base section weighs 3305 lbs and is 24' wide at the bottom with a 2' taper), and all legs are tubular right to the top.

Maybe I'm missing something, but the "down" towers look really light duty.
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K3GM
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Posts: 1815




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« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2010, 09:30:22 AM »

I'm astonished 400' self-supporting towers appeared to be fabricated from angle stock for the legs.....

For 18 years I worked next to a beautiful 600' free-stander on Mermaid Lane in Wyndmoor, PA (just outside of Philadelphia).  The major portion of the tower was constructed from angle steel and cross wires with only the upper portion built from tube stock.  I'd walk over on windy days, look up, and observe a deflection at the top of of many feet.  This tower is over 60 years old!  It's remarkable that given the age and dense residential location of this tower, that it still exists.  Here's some picture links to it:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/stevelogan/sets/72157600277656958/with/518119691/
http://www.broadcastpioneers.com/tower1.html
« Last Edit: August 11, 2010, 09:34:01 AM by Tom Hybiske » Logged
W7ARX
Member

Posts: 453




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« Reply #8 on: August 11, 2010, 10:10:21 AM »

Wow....glad God was watching over as no one on the ground got hurt.. wouldn't anticipate that around those towers but one never knows...

The towers don't look all that robust either....

Mother Nature frequently teaches us a lesson in humility....

The temp antenna sure will crank some power...can we borrow it for a 160 Meter Contest (Hi)....

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W5RB
Member

Posts: 564




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« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2010, 10:25:00 AM »

I'm astonished 400' self-supporting towers appeared to be fabricated from angle stock for the legs.

All the BC SS towers I've seen around here use tubular legs; even the medium-duty Rohn SSV starts out with 5" diameter pipe legs at the base (20' base section weighs 3305 lbs and is 24' wide at the bottom with a 2' taper), and all legs are tubular right to the top.

Maybe I'm missing something, but the "down" towers look really light duty.

These were built by Blaw-Knox , probably in the 1930s . They're insulated-base , "hot towers" for an AM directional array . The fact they've been standing this long suggests their engineering was good . They do look spindly compared to the 300-footer that stood over my old office at ETV . I'd like to look at the NWS radar archive for the time they fell , the "downburst" must have been tremendous . Links below may offer some more insight .

Russ , W5RB

http://forums.hamisland.net/showthread.php?12815-Storms-Knock-Down-WWVA-Towers

http://www.wwva.com/cc-common/mainheadlines2.html?feed=119921&article=7439986

http://www.wwva.com/cc-common/gallery/display.html?album_id=244870
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2813




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« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2010, 10:50:29 AM »

(In my best Crocodile Dundee voice):  "THAT'S not a tower!  THIS is a tower!!"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BREN_Tower

I used to work about 3 miles from the BREN Tower in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site -- not far at all from Area 51.

If you Google for images of the BREN tower, you can see the construction.  The Wiki site above describes it in words, but seeing it up close is just awesome.

73
Pat K7KBN
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
W0BTU
Member

Posts: 1703


WWW

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« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2010, 09:56:32 PM »

I'm astonished 400' self-supporting towers appeared to be fabricated from angle stock for the legs.
...

Reminds me of this one:
http://www.brainmist.com/wjjy_tv/wjjy_tv.htm

Doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out why that tower came down with that antenna with all the ice on it.

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