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Author Topic: FCC License Counts  (Read 200842 times)
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3875




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« on: August 22, 2010, 04:30:34 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on August 21, 2010 was:

Novice:            16,134    (2.3%)
Technician      341,643  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          154,598  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,867    (8.6%)
Extra              121,879  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,121

73 de Jim, N2EY
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KI4SDY
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Posts: 1452




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« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2010, 09:53:50 PM »

Gee, your "eHam.net expert" buddy K1CJS previously posted that ham radio was declining.Huh I guess he was wrong! Wink
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N2EY
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Posts: 3875




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« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2010, 03:35:17 AM »

Gee, your "eHam.net expert" buddy K1CJS previously posted that ham radio was declining.Huh I guess he was wrong! Wink

I didn't see that one. He wasn't "wrong" as much as "out of date".

To show some longer-term trends, here are the numbers from May 14, 2000, and Feb 22 2007, from the same source as the others I posted (percentages are rounded off):

As of May 14, 2000:
 
Novice - 49,329 (7.3%)
Technician - 205,394 (30.4%)
Technician Plus - 128,860 (19.1%)
General - 112,677 (16.7%)
Advanced - 99,782 (14.8%)
Extra - 78,750 (11.7%)

Total Tech/TechPlus - 334,254 (49.5%)

Total all classes - 674,792


As of February 22, 2007:

Novice - 22,896 (3.5%)
Technician - 293,508 (44.8%)
Technician Plus - 30,818 (4.7%)
General - 130,138 (19.9%)
Advanced - 69,050 (10.5%)
Extra - 108,270 (16.5%)

Total Tech/TechPlus - 324,326 (49.5%)

Total all classes - 654,680



73 de Jim, N2EY   
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KI4SDY
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Posts: 1452




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« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2010, 08:01:57 AM »

No, he was wrong at the time he made recent the statement. The number of licensees has been increasing for years, right after they eliminated the code requirement. Wink
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3875




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« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2010, 02:52:18 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on August 28, 2010 was:

Novice:            16,121    (2.3%)
Technician      341,583  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          154,720  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,852    (8.6%)
Extra              121,963  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,259  (new all-time high)

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3875




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« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2010, 04:43:13 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on September 4, 2010 was:

Novice:            16,102    (2.3%)
Technician      341,474  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          154,778  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,819    (8.6%)
Extra              121,982  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,155  

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3875




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« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2010, 03:37:18 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on September 11, 2010 was:

Novice:            16,081    (2.3%)
Technician      341,512  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          154,818  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,798    (8.6%)
Extra              122,015  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,224  

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3875




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« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2010, 04:49:18 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on September 18, 2010 was:

Novice:            16,067    (2.3%)
Technician      341,452  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          154,916  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,774    (8.6%)
Extra              122,092  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,295 (new all-time high)  

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3875




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« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2010, 04:12:21 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on September 25, 2010 was:

Novice:            16,049    (2.3%)
Technician      341,528  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          154,970  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,757    (8.6%)
Extra              122,168  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,472 (new all-time high)  

73 de Jim, N2EY

« Last Edit: October 03, 2010, 06:16:36 PM by James Miccolis » Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3875




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« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2010, 05:11:50 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on October 2, 2010 was:

Novice:            16,025    (2.3%)
Technician      341,546  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          154,983  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,714    (8.6%)
Extra              122,199  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,467  

73 de Jim, N2EY
« Last Edit: October 03, 2010, 06:17:10 PM by James Miccolis » Logged
KA4AAA
Member

Posts: 8




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« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2010, 07:00:50 AM »

Well, I was a 13wpm Tech Plus until March 14th of last year.  So, I was probably one of the last.

Now studying for my Extra.
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AC6IJ
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Posts: 53




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« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2010, 07:10:08 PM »

How does all this info. compare to the number of people in the U.S.A.?  I would think that if the population is increasing drasticaly then the number of Hams should follow. Without this info. how can we make any statement? Bill 
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3875




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« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2010, 03:23:09 AM »

How does all this info. compare to the number of people in the U.S.A.? 

Good question!

The following numbers have been posted by W5ESE on QRZ.com and elsewhere:
 
Year    Population     #Hams  Hams as % of US Population
1913   97,225,000     2,000  0.002%
1914   99,111,000     5,000  0.005%
1916 101,961,000     6,000  0.006%
1921 108,538,000   10,809  0.010%
1922 110,049,000   14,179  0.013%
1930 123,202,624   19,000  0.015%
1940 132,164,569   56,000  0.042%
1950 151,325,798   87,000  0.057%
1960 179,323,175 230,000  0.128%
1970 203,211,926 263,918  0.130%
1980 226,545,805 393,353  0.174%
1990 248,709,873 502,677  0.202%
1997 267,783,607 678,733  0.253%
2000 281,421,906 682,240  0.242%
2005 296,410,404 662,600  0.224%
2006 299,291,772 657,814  0.220%
2008 303,000,000 658,648  0.217%
2010 310,425,814 694,313  0.224%

The 2010 figures are from the US population clock

http://www.census.gov/main/www/popclock.html

and ARRL's FCC license counts as of today.

Some significant-to-US-ham-radio historical events:

1912: Mandatory licensing of all US radio amateurs
1917: US amateur radio shut down because of WW1
1919: US amateur radio reopened after WW1
1920s: Radio broadcasting boom; amateurs pioneer use of short-waves
1929: New regulations require higher quality transmitters and drastically narrow US ham bands. Stock market crashes
1930s: Great Depression
1941: US amateur radio shut down because of WW2
1945: US amateur radio reopened after WW2
1951: Restructuring doubles number of US license classes, Novice, Technician and Extra created
1957: Sputnik launched
1958: 27 MHz cb authorized
1960s: SSB replaces AM as most-popular voice mode on HF amateur bands
1968-69: Incentive licensing rules enacted
1970s: Novice becomes renewable, experience requirement for Extra eliminated. Repeater boom era.
1984: VEC system replaces FCC office testing. CSCEs created.
1990: Medical waivers for 13 and 20 wpm code tests
1991: Technician loses its code test completely
2000: Restructuring closes off 3 license classes and reduces test requirements for other 3.
2007: Code testing completely eliminated for US amateur licenses.

There are many more events; add your own.

Note how the growth has varied with time, both in percentages and totals. Oddly enough, the period of most-rapid-growth in terms of percentage was the 1930s, when the number of US hams almost tripled, despite the Great Depression.

The 1950s were high-growth time, in part because of the Novice license (started in 1951). This growth is even more remarkable when you consider that the population growth of the 1950s was mostly in the form of the baby boom. 

The 1960s saw very slow growth, but were followed by the faster growth of the 1970s, 1980s and most of the 1990s. The 1970s are particularly interesting because they were a time when the economy was terrible and the full effects of incentive licensing (imposed 1968-1969) were most felt. Yet we had tremendous growth then, and onwards to the mid-1990s.

Since 1997 we've seen ups and downs, and we're still behind where we were in 1997 in terms of hams as a percentage of the population. But the numbers are catching up.

Of course the numbers of licensees only tell part of the story. They don't tell how many licensees are active amateurs, in the form of having a station and getting on the air. They don't tell how many hams use a particular band or mode, or how much they operate, work on projects, etc.

FCC doesn't have age data on all licensees so it's impossible to accurately determine the mean or median age of US amateurs. (When you see "average age" figures tossed around, ask how they were derived.) 

The license term went to 10 years in 1984, which means there were no expirations at all from 1989 to 1994, and that a ham can drop out yet be carried on the license totals for almost a decade. 

There are lots of other factors - housing, economics, sources of population growth (immigration vs. babies), increasing lifespans, cell phones, the internet, and much more.

I became a ham in 1967, and for 43 years I've heard predictions of doom and gloom for amateur radio. Yet it's still here.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
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Posts: 3875




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« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2010, 04:28:37 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on October 9, 2010 was:

Novice:            16,011    (2.3%)
Technician      341,593  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,066  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,686    (8.6%)
Extra              122,237  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,593  (new all-time high)

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
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Posts: 3875




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« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2010, 05:01:06 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on October 16, 2010 was:

Novice:            15,993    (2.3%)
Technician      341,564  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,094  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,661    (8.6%)
Extra              122,290  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,602  (new all-time high)

73 de Jim, N2EY
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