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Author Topic: Average study time for general and Extra  (Read 2711 times)
KD4RLV
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Posts: 34




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« on: May 10, 2016, 05:31:36 AM »

Hi there,
What is the studying time for General and Extra?..It's been years since, I have had my tech license, and it's time for me to stop putting things off and take the exams. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in Advance.
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W2EM
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Posts: 58




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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2016, 12:35:30 PM »

Check this out:

http://www.eham.net/ehamforum/smf/index.php/topic,107562.0.html

You can do it at your own pace.  Read a chapter every night or whatever.

People have different ideas on this subject but this works for a lot of hams.
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N0IU
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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2016, 02:18:11 PM »

Don't judge your progress by other people's standards or you will just set yourself up for failure.
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SWMAN
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Posts: 807




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« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2016, 07:19:23 AM »

 I didn't really study for my Tech or General. I just looked over the Radio Shack books and looked at a few sample questions in the back. I guess I just got lucky. I figured if I failed I would just take it again. So I did get lucky. But a lot of the things asked were just basic and I already knew. Good Luck, Jim W5JJG and 73
« Last Edit: May 11, 2016, 10:25:07 AM by SWMAN » Logged
KM4OBL
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Posts: 34




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« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2016, 08:19:43 AM »

I  had no electronics background and have a terrible memory.  It took me a couple of months for each test (to the point of getting zero questions wrong on practice tests).
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AA4HA
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Posts: 1962




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« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2016, 06:01:56 AM »

For someone with technician-level skills and understanding to get competent enough to understand the concepts and to properly pass a general exam..

These are my observations of how successful adults are at integrating knowledge;

Between 40-120 hours of actually reading the materials, understanding the concepts, doing the exercises and then taking practice exams.

When I say "doing the exercises" it does not mean just jumping on to a practice exam site and repeatedly taking tests until you get a passing score. It is about going through the study guide, doing the lessons and working out a few problems until you gain an understanding of the concepts before you progress on to the next chapter.

I have been teaching communications and electronics subjects to adult learners for about 30 years. Most of the students were about on-par with the skills of a technician-class license holder (some electronics familiarity but not in depth).
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
Free space loss (dB) = 32.4 + 20 × log10d + 20 × log10 f
KA5ROW
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« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2016, 03:45:38 PM »

I would say a week to 10 days in the evening after work depending how much stress your job puts on you, High stress 3 or 4 weeks,  the questions are easy.
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W5WSS
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« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2016, 07:56:57 PM »

Do it quickly the question pool has been scheduled to change around June 2016 to include most of the existing questions and adding more digital oriented questions will probably result is a slightly larger pool of questions...more to prepare for.

73
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N0IU
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« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2016, 05:11:47 AM »

Do it quickly the question pool has been scheduled to change around June 2016 to include most of the existing questions and adding more digital oriented questions will probably result is a slightly larger pool of questions...more to prepare for.

73

The General Class question pool is good from July 1, 2015 until June 30, 2019. The pool contains 462 questions. The test is 35 questions. You need to answer 26 correctly.

The current Extra Class pool expires on June 30, 2016. The new test pool goes into effect on July 1, 2016 and is good until June 30, 2020. In either case, the test is 50 questions. You need to answer 37 correctly. The current test pool (2012-2016) has 700 questions. The new test pool (2016-2020) has 712 questions.

Questions removed from the 2012-2016 pool: 131
New questions added to the 2016-2020 pool: 143
Questions which have been updated: 60

So yes, the new test pool is slightly larger, but only by 12 questions which is only about 1.7% larger than the old pool.
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AA4HA
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« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2016, 08:52:49 AM »

IMHO,

The size of the question pool becomes irrelevant if you actually learn the concepts and can work the problems.

Question pool sizes are only important if you do not want to learn, but only seek to game the system by memorizing.

The question pool should be made much larger; to the point where it is easier to actually learn the theory, instead of memorizing 5000 answers.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
Free space loss (dB) = 32.4 + 20 × log10d + 20 × log10 f
K7KBN
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Posts: 3224




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« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2016, 10:02:30 AM »

The length of time this thread has been going on would have been plenty to study for the General back in 1960.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
HAMSTUDY
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Posts: 236




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« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2016, 09:13:13 PM »

It's hard to say how long it will take without knowing more about your background and current level of knowledge.  If you had to spend some amount of time to get your Tech I think it could be a similar effort to get the General.  Some of it might depend on how much time you let pass between the Tech and the General.  I think there is likely some benefit from doing them back to back as much as possible so you can better retain and build on the the Tech knowledge.  Another variable is whether you are going to emphasize learning the test questions or learning the underlying content in terms of concepts, math, etc - or probably do some of both.  Long story short, I think for people who are new to ham and radio and electronics the effort and time to study for a Tech will be comparable to the effort and time to study for the General, but YMMV, possibly a lot.

One thing I found after getting the Tech and before getting the General is this site:
https://hamstudy.org/

It's my Uncle's site.  JUST KIDDING.  I don't have any affiliation with it whatsoever - it just happens to have a URL similar to my eHam user name.  (I set my eHam name a few months ago and just recently discovered the hamstudy.org site.)  The site lets you study via practice tests and flashcards and there are several things about it that make it really helpful.  1. It gives you a progress indicator letting you know how what % of the way through the material you have gone - both in terms of having simply encountered the questions and in terms of how well you are doing with respect to learning/remembering the material.  2. The best part is that it remembers your misses and it emphasizes/re-asks the missed questions which means the repetition helps you get there as fast as possible with the material that needs the most attention.  It's pretty/very efficient.  3. When you want to see the correct answers you can easily get see the answers but it also gives you a chance to flip the question cards and see a concise explanation of the underlying concepts and/or math.  So you don't have to go here and there trying to figure things out - you can stay in the app quite a bit (of course you will have other reference material to consult). 4. If you find that you are strong in some areas but not so strong in others, you can focus just on the subelements that will be most useful for your study.

There are several other good sites out there and the ARRL guides and others books are very good, but if you are trying to get up to speed in a hurry and also want to learn the material with some broader comprehension hamstudy.org is pretty strong.

73
« Last Edit: June 01, 2016, 09:17:37 PM by HAMSTUDY » Logged
KC2QYM
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Posts: 596




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« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2016, 07:21:29 AM »

Just another silly study by Hamstudy.  Are the results of this pseudo scientific inquiry going to affect your study planning to take the test? 
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KC2QYM
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Posts: 596




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« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2016, 07:24:33 AM »

Sorry...misdirected toward Hamstudy...my bad...But my statement is meant to say to the poster that you should just get it done...and how can you judge how long it takes to study something to master the material...Isn't it obvious that people learn at different rates?
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HAMSTUDY
Member

Posts: 236




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« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2016, 06:49:24 PM »

reposting this post by wm6h

It has a link showing the founder of Adafruit using hamstudy.org to help pass all 3 license tests.

On a side note I agree with wm6h; think there can be good synergy between the "maker" community and the ham community, and that there are lessons in here for manufacturers.

The main point though for this thread is the efficacy of hamstudy.org

----

If you know about the "Maker" movement you may be familiar with Lady Ada (Limor--owner of adafruit.com.

She set off to get her technician and made a video http://youtu.be/XjAA8YxBkS0
Which can be either be an inspiring or intimidating story (she is super smart).
She uses license study software called "Ham Study" I think.

Ham radio manufactures should take note. They just might be disrupted hard.
At any rate, I think this is a good story for the hobby.

Bob
wm6h
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