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Author Topic: FCC License Counts  (Read 222007 times)
K1CJS
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Posts: 6046




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« Reply #15 on: October 19, 2010, 09:39:37 PM »

I got 'SDY on 'ignore', but I saw you quote him.  My mention was that ham licenses aren't increasing as fast as population growth is, therefore the percentage of hams when compared to the current world population is slowly dropping.  SDY is nothing but a pot stirrer anyway.  That's why I ignore his rants.

73, K1CJS
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




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« Reply #16 on: October 20, 2010, 02:32:03 PM »

My mention was that ham licenses aren't increasing as fast as population growth is, therefore the percentage of hams when compared to the current world population is slowly dropping. 

Well, I don't know about the current world population vs. ham population.

But I do know that for the past 2-3 years the USA ham population has been growing faster than the overall USA population. That's clear from the changes in percentage posted earlier.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




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« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2010, 04:32:42 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on October 23, 2010 was:

Novice:            15,974    (2.3%)
Technician      341,616  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,132  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,635    (8.6%)
Extra              122,361  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,718  (new all-time high)

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




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« Reply #18 on: October 31, 2010, 07:56:18 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on October 30, 2010 was:

Novice:            15,951    (2.3%)
Technician      341,802  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,199  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,610    (8.6%)
Extra              122,426  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,988  (new all-time high)

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




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« Reply #19 on: November 07, 2010, 07:18:27 PM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on October 30, 2010 was:

Novice:            15,924    (2.3%)
Technician      341,733  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,171  (22.3%)
Advanced         59,578    (8.6%)
Extra              122,472  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,878

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




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« Reply #20 on: November 21, 2010, 05:39:25 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on November 20, 2010 was:

Novice:            15,890    (2.3%)
Technician      342,030  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,421  (22.3%)
Advanced         59,521    (8.6%)
Extra              122,587  (17.6%)

Total               695,449

73 de Jim, N2EY

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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




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« Reply #21 on: November 28, 2010, 06:41:53 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on November 27, 2010 was:

Novice:            15,861    (2.3%)
Technician      342,018  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,463  (22.3%)
Advanced         59,489    (8.6%)
Extra              122,624  (17.6%)

Total               695,455

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2010, 07:06:59 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on December 4, 2010 was:

Novice:            15,844    (2.3%)
Technician      342,154  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,520  (22.4%)
Advanced         59,466    (8.5%)
Extra              122,706  (17.6%)

Total               695,690

73 de Jim, N2EY
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KD6EVH
Member

Posts: 33




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« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2010, 08:42:58 AM »


Year    Population     #Hams  Hams as % of US Population
1913   97,225,000     2,000  0.002%
1914   99,111,000     5,000  0.005%
1916 101,961,000     6,000  0.006%
1921 108,538,000   10,809  0.010%
1922 110,049,000   14,179  0.013%
1930 123,202,624   19,000  0.015%
1940 132,164,569   56,000  0.042%
1950 151,325,798   87,000  0.057%
1960 179,323,175 230,000  0.128%
1970 203,211,926 263,918  0.130%
1980 226,545,805 393,353  0.174%
1990 248,709,873 502,677  0.202%
1997 267,783,607 678,733  0.253%
2000 281,421,906 682,240  0.242%
2005 296,410,404 662,600  0.224%
2006 299,291,772 657,814  0.220%
2008 303,000,000 658,648  0.217%
2010 310,425,814 694,313  0.224%


Some significant-to-US-ham-radio historical events:

1912: Mandatory licensing of all US radio amateurs
1917: US amateur radio shut down because of WW1
1919: US amateur radio reopened after WW1
1920s: Radio broadcasting boom; amateurs pioneer use of short-waves
1929: New regulations require higher quality transmitters and drastically narrow US ham bands. Stock market crashes
1930s: Great Depression
1941: US amateur radio shut down because of WW2
1945: US amateur radio reopened after WW2
1951: Restructuring doubles number of US license classes, Novice, Technician and Extra created
1957: Sputnik launched
1958: 27 MHz cb authorized
1960s: SSB replaces AM as most-popular voice mode on HF amateur bands
1968-69: Incentive licensing rules enacted
1970s: Novice becomes renewable, experience requirement for Extra eliminated. Repeater boom era.
1984: VEC system replaces FCC office testing. CSCEs created.
1990: Medical waivers for 13 and 20 wpm code tests
1991: Technician loses its code test completely
2000: Restructuring closes off 3 license classes and reduces test requirements for other 3.
2007: Code testing completely eliminated for US amateur licenses.


73 de Jim, N2EY

Thanks, looking at this, it looks like some of the biggest "shots in the arm" to ham radio have come form the things that Amateur Radio operators have reviled the most. CB seems to have sparked interest in the radio communication hobby. Reducing, and eliminating, the code requirements seem to have made that interest accessible.
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aka. AF7JA
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: December 05, 2010, 04:38:31 PM »

Thanks, looking at this, it looks like some of the biggest "shots in the arm" to ham radio have come form the things that Amateur Radio operators have reviled the most. CB seems to have sparked interest in the radio communication hobby. Reducing, and eliminating, the code requirements seem to have made that interest accessible.

Not really.

Consider the following:

1930 123,202,624   19,000  0.015%
1940 132,164,569   56,000  0.042%

During the 1930s, the number of US hams almost tripled. The percentage of the population took a giant leap as well. Yet those were the years of the Great Depression, and immediately after the 1929 regulations which cut the size of several amateur bands and imposed strict new regulations on transmitters. Also, in 1936 the code test speed went from 10 wpm to 13 wpm and the written exams were upgraded.

1950 151,325,798   87,000  0.057%
1960 179,323,175 230,000  0.128%

The 1950s were a decade of tremendous growth in US amateur radio as well - almost a much as in the 1930s percentagewise. Yet this was the decade when TV became widespread in the USA. And it was almost all before 11 meter CB, which was created by FCC in 1958.

Now look at the 1960s:

1960 179,323,175 230,000  0.128%
1970 203,211,926 263,918  0.130%

Why so little growth in that decade? We had good economic times, the Space Race, and much more. Yet US ham radio barely kept up with the population growth. This was the decade when 11 meter cb went from a few users to millions.

Some might blame incentive licensing, but those changes didn't happen until November 1968 and 1969. So their full effects wouldn't be seen until the 1970s - which were also economic hard times. But look at the numbers:

1970 203,211,926 263,918  0.130%
1980 226,545,805 393,353  0.174%
 
The growth in the 1970s was far more than in the 1960s despite the increase in license requirements and the economic troubles. About 33,000 more hams in the 1960s, almost 130,000 - four times more! - in the 1970s. Why?

73 de Jim, N2EY



 
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




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« Reply #25 on: December 11, 2010, 08:51:46 PM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on December 10, 2010 was:

Novice:            15,824    (2.3%)
Technician      342,249  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,574  (22.4%)
Advanced         59,428    (8.5%)
Extra              122,765  (17.6%)

Total               695,840

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




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« Reply #26 on: December 30, 2010, 10:13:55 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on December 29, 2010 was:

Novice:            15,733    (2.3%)
Technician      342,176  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,794  (22.4%)
Advanced         59,399    (8.5%)
Extra              122,955  (17.7%)

Total               696,057

73 es HNY  de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




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« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2011, 10:05:35 AM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on Januiary 15, 2011 was:

Novice:            15,701    (2.3%)
Technician      342,191  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,885  (22.4%)
Advanced         59,361    (8.5%)
Extra              123,022  (17.7%)

Total               696,160

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




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« Reply #28 on: January 27, 2011, 04:51:29 PM »

Updated numbers from:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on Januiary 26, 2011 was:

Novice:            15,672    (2.3%)
Technician      342,274  (49.1%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          155,991  (22.4%)
Advanced         59,327    (8.5%)
Extra              123,147  (17.7%)

Total               696,411

73 de Jim, N2EY
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KH2BR
Member

Posts: 103




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« Reply #29 on: January 27, 2011, 04:57:09 PM »

Can you do a japanese count for us and place side by side? It would be interesting to know if JA land has more hams then the US.
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