Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 [13] 14 15 16 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: FCC License Counts  (Read 193480 times)
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3844




Ignore
« Reply #180 on: November 21, 2013, 11:07:46 AM »

Jim, do old novices renew at Technician?

No, they do not.

In fact a Novice gives no upgrade credit towards any other license.

From April 15, 2000 to some time in mid-2010, FCC was renewing all Technician Plus licenses as Technician. That's why the Tech Plus totals are zero. All other license classes stay the same upon renewal or modification (name or address change).

If a currently-licensed Technician can show that s/he held the Technician class license before March 21, 1987, s/he can get a no-test upgrade to General through the VE system. This is done because the Technician and General used the exact same written exam before March 21, 1987. All other upgrades require passing the tests.

I know Advance can renew at Advanced.

The license class name has been "Advanced" since 1951. Before that, it was "Class A".

We are now at the point where more than 90% (9 out of 10) of US hams with current licenses hold either Technician, General or Extra. Fewer than 10% are Novices or Advanceds.


73 de Jim, N2EY


Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3844




Ignore
« Reply #181 on: December 03, 2013, 11:04:54 AM »

From http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on December 2, 2013 was:

Novice:            13,116     (1.8%)
Technician      348,776    (48.7%)
Technician Plus         0     (0.0%)
General          166,974   (23.3%)
Advanced         54,488     (7.6%)
Extra              133,276   (18.6%)

Total              716,630

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
WN2C
Member

Posts: 429




Ignore
« Reply #182 on: December 05, 2013, 07:08:04 AM »

From http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on December 2, 2013 was:

Novice:            13,116     (1.8%)                 
Technician      348,776    (48.7%)
Technician Plus         0     (0.0%)
General          166,974   (23.3%)
Advanced         54,488     (7.6%)
Extra              133,276   (18.6%)

Total              716,630

73 de Jim, N2EY

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on August 21, 2010 was:

Novice:            16,134    (2.3%)
Technician      341,643  (49.2%)
Technician Plus         0    (0.0%)
General          154,598  (22.3%) (new all-time high)
Advanced         59,867    (8.6%)
Extra              121,879  (17.6%) (new all-time high)

Total               694,121


Although the total number of hams has increased, the percentages have not changed very much in just over 2 years.
Logged
AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1378




Ignore
« Reply #183 on: December 18, 2013, 10:40:32 AM »

Since the last Tech Plus license expired on June 10th, 2010 and the two year grace period expired (as of June 10th, 2012) should we just stop counting the tech plus as a category? It is gone-gone-gone and can never come back now. It is impossible for anyone who held one that has expired to apply for a renewal. They would need to re-test inside of the current license classes.

Logged

Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
K9AIM
Member

Posts: 938




Ignore
« Reply #184 on: December 18, 2013, 11:05:13 AM »

agreed, but i think the data is copy & pasted from the FCC site.  Deleting the Tech Plus line of data would be appropriate, but more work.  Wink
Logged
K7RNO
Member

Posts: 279




Ignore
« Reply #185 on: December 21, 2013, 03:54:02 PM »

My neighborhood is way out of whack then.
In my zip code (84601), the share of Extras is all of 5.3% (five.three)!

Well, I raised that share to 6.0% today.
Logged

73,
aRNO
NAQCC #6870, SKCC #11131
AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1378




Ignore
« Reply #186 on: December 24, 2013, 08:34:33 AM »

My neighborhood is way out of whack then.
In my zip code (84601), the share of Extras is all of 5.3% (five.three)!

Well, I raised that share to 6.0% today.
Congratulations!
Logged

Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
K9AIM
Member

Posts: 938




Ignore
« Reply #187 on: January 08, 2014, 07:32:39 AM »

Anyone know what percentage of US licensed hams have callsign numbers outside of their district of residence? I am just curious as to how far it has moved since back in the day... 
Logged
W3HF
Member

Posts: 677


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #188 on: January 08, 2014, 12:53:27 PM »

Anyone know what percentage of US licensed hams have callsign numbers outside of their district of residence? I am just curious as to how far it has moved since back in the day... 
That used to be a statistic on the home page of the now-defunct VanityHQ. The last page I can find archived (on web.archive.org) states "88.40% of hams have call signs which represent their home QTH district."
Logged
K9AIM
Member

Posts: 938




Ignore
« Reply #189 on: January 08, 2014, 01:16:32 PM »

That used to be a statistic on the home page of the now-defunct VanityHQ. The last page I can find archived (on web.archive.org) states "88.40% of hams have call signs which represent their home QTH district."

Thanks for the research & response!  I am surprised it is that high as I thought it would be much lower.  If it is not too much trouble, what was the date of that statistic and was it from an archived Vanity HQ page?

73, and thanks again

Rob K9AIM
Logged
HURRICAINE
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #190 on: January 08, 2014, 01:26:01 PM »

Quote

Agreed! There are some other factors:

1) The difference in privileges between an Advanced and an Extra isn't all that great unless you are interested in certain specific parts of ham radio. What I mean by this is that all the Advanced-to-Extra upgrade gives is some small parts of a couple of HF bands, and a few more choices of vanity call. If an Advanced isn't really interested in those particular things, why bother?


73 de Jim, N2EY

I think Jim that you miss the point entirely.
The point is that you should not just take from amateur radio, you should also give back!
If you only have an advanced class license, you cannot give all classes of license examination as a VE.
This would make me wonder how many Advanced Class Licensee's are VE's and how many of them are just out for themselves.

No point in the ladder was designed to be a stopping point in the ladder of success in Amateur Radio...

Yes a Technician class license will get ( YOU ) on most bands with CW and gives you some phone privileges on 10 meters, but it doesn't permit you to contribute much towards amateur radio as a whole.

Yes an Advanced Class license is slightly better then a General Class License, but does it really prove that you did anything much past getting the license?  I mean, if you are not giving VE test sessions or doing anything much with it beyond rag chewing on the HF, are you really contributing anything towards the good of amateur radio?

When I took my exams, 3 poor people had to sit there and administer those exams to me, and if I chose to take it three times, they sat through all three times, even though they had better things to do.

Those very same people offered me a ride to the next VE test session elsewhere in their own private vehicle just so I could have more opportunities at taking the exam.

If they had chose to stop learning at the Advanced Level, there would have been no one to give me the Amateur Extra Class license exam.

Without frequent license examinations, most people would give up when they got to the General Class License Examination and would think that this is all that there is and this is all that ( I ) need!

Isn't it better to give back something to amateur radio instead of just being the person that takes all the time?
Logged
HURRICAINE
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #191 on: January 08, 2014, 01:59:07 PM »

>>The growth in the 1970s was far more than in the 1960s despite the increase in license requirements and the economic troubles. About 33,000 more hams in the 1960s, almost 130,000 - four times more! - in the 1970s. Why?<<

It is a puzzle. Of course there is the baby boom (which you have already mentioned). Many statisticians define this group, to which I belong, as anyone born between 1946 and 1964. The oldest members of this group were about 14 years old in 1960 and the youngest were about 16 years old in 1980. The 1950s, '60s and early '70s when many of us were in High School were a time of worry about the "missile gap" and stress on languages and science in schools --

But the baby boom data do not explain why, in the United States, the ham population grew a lot more in the 1970s than '60s. The opposite should have happened, because the biggest "baby bulge" came in the years immediately after WWII. About the only (really lame) explanation I can think of is that, in the lingo of the times, ham radio might have been less "groovy" among the politically activist 1960s teenagers than among the recession-hit 1970s cohort.

Some other factors:

1) In the USA in the 1960s, cb radio was growing by leaps and bounds, and initially probably distracted many potential hams.

2) One of the most-common ways people learned about amateur radio used to be hearing amateurs using AM 'phone on "shortwave" receivers. But by the 1960s US interest in SWLing was beginning to decline. More important, large numbers of US hams had switched from AM to SSB, which typical SW receivers could not demodulate easily. So that method
of spreading the word decreased.  

4) From 1957 to the early 1960s, the USSR led in the "space race", making most of the "firsts" in space. But once the USA got going, the gap closed, with more and more impressive manned and unmanned successes in space. Finally the USA "won" the race by sending humans to the moon in 1969. In the USA, all this happened live on TV.

With such rapid progress in space, amateur radio seemed to many to be "old hat" even in the 1960s. How could terrestrial HF DX be "leading edge" when we were watching astronauts on the moon live on TV, or seeing pictures of Mars sent back over tens of millions of miles from unmanned probes?

73 de Jim, N2EY

Jim,
Where did the technology come from - to get those videos from the moon to the earth with a limited amount of expenditure of power from the space capsule to send those video's?

SSTV - which came from the Amateur Radio.....
Logged
HURRICAINE
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #192 on: January 08, 2014, 02:38:16 PM »

Depends on how old the youngest Advanced licensee is, whether or not any of those Advanced class upgrade---and whether or not the FCC changes the regs and eliminates the Advanced class altogether!  (Remember, they've done something like that before.)

The FCC has done something similar only twice.

First, in the 1970s they eliminated the Conditional class. Then in the 2000s they eliminated the Technician Plus class.

In both cases the elimination was handled by changing the license class when the license was renewed or modified. Conditionals became Generals, Technician Pluses became Technicians. But nobody got additional operating privileges from the change.

So hanging on to an Advanced in the hope of a no-test upgrade to Extra is a very long shot. There are no proposals pending to change the way things are.

---

As can be seen, the number of US hams with an Advanced or Novice is now less than 10% of the total, and is steadily dropping. AFAIK it costs FCC practically nothing to keep these old license classes separate in the database. So they will simply let time do the job.

Fun historical fact:

The FCC closed the Advanced to new issues at the end of 1952 and reopened it in 1967. IIRC, the reopen date was Nov. 22 1967 (but don't take that as absolute fact). So the Advanced was closed to new issues for 14 years, 10 months and 22 days the first time.

The FCC reclosed the Advanced to new issues on April 15, 2000. As of this writing, it's been closed off 12 years, 10 months and 6 days.

73 de Jim, N2EY

But Jim, if you remember back to the 1950's, when there was only two classes of license, a Technician type license and a General class license.  The General Class license had all privileges.
When the multi tiered license came about, had they demoted the General to just the General Class bands, they would have taken away license privileges.  So in fact the change was 3 times and not two.
When they went to the multi tiered license system, they had to Grandfather in all General's as Amateur Extra's, else they would have lost license privileges.  My Elmer friend had told me this story on many occasions.
Logged
HURRICAINE
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #193 on: January 08, 2014, 06:14:32 PM »

Depends on how old the youngest Advanced licensee is, whether or not any of those Advanced class upgrade---and whether or not the FCC changes the regs and eliminates the Advanced class altogether!  (Remember, they've done something like that before.)

The FCC has done something similar only twice.

First, in the 1970s they eliminated the Conditional class. Then in the 2000s they eliminated the Technician Plus class.

In both cases the elimination was handled by changing the license class when the license was renewed or modified. Conditionals became Generals, Technician Pluses became Technicians. But nobody got additional operating privileges from the change.

So hanging on to an Advanced in the hope of a no-test upgrade to Extra is a very long shot. There are no proposals pending to change the way things are.

---

As can be seen, the number of US hams with an Advanced or Novice is now less than 10% of the total, and is steadily dropping. AFAIK it costs FCC practically nothing to keep these old license classes separate in the database. So they will simply let time do the job.

Fun historical fact:

The FCC closed the Advanced to new issues at the end of 1952 and reopened it in 1967. IIRC, the reopen date was Nov. 22 1967 (but don't take that as absolute fact). So the Advanced was closed to new issues for 14 years, 10 months and 22 days the first time.

The FCC reclosed the Advanced to new issues on April 15, 2000. As of this writing, it's been closed off 12 years, 10 months and 6 days.

73 de Jim, N2EY

Your right, my friend changed his story, guess he must have sobered up or something.  That is the problem with listening to the stories told by these old hams!
Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3844




Ignore
« Reply #194 on: January 09, 2014, 03:32:29 PM »

But Jim, if you remember back to the 1950's, when there was only two classes of license, a Technician type license and a General class license.  The General Class license had all privileges.
When the multi tiered license came about, had they demoted the General to just the General Class bands, they would have taken away license privileges.  So in fact the change was 3 times and not two.
When they went to the multi tiered license system, they had to Grandfather in all General's as Amateur Extra's, else they would have lost license privileges.  My Elmer friend had told me this story on many occasions.

There are so many mistakes in that short little post that it's hard to know where to begin. Either your Elmer didn't know what he was talking about, or you misunderstood.

In the 1950s there was never a situation where there were only two license classes in the USA. Never.

Before the 1951 restructuring, there were three license classes: A, B and C. After the restructuring, there were six: Novice, Technician, General (old Class B renamed), Conditional (old Class C, renamed), Advanced (old Class A, renamed), and Extra.

Before February 16, 1953, you needed an Advanced/Class A or Extra to operate 'phone on the ham bands between 2.5 and 25 MHz. Generals had no voice privileges on those bands. None at all.

In late 1952 the FCC changed their mind and gave all privileges to Conditionals and Generals. But Novices and Technicians still had limited privileges.

The changes of the 1960s that became known as "incentive licensing" were an attempt to get back to the pre-1953 sort of system. A lot of hams lost privileges - I was one of them, having earned my Advanced in the summer of 1968. I got full privileges in 1970 by passing the Extra. (In those days you needed two years' experience as a General, Conditional or Advanced just to take the Extra test).

There's a lot more to the story.

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 [13] 14 15 16 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!