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Author Topic: FCC License Counts  (Read 634304 times)
N2EY
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Posts: 4441




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« Reply #600 on: September 27, 2017, 07:05:47 AM »

From http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on September 26, 2017 was:

Novice:                  9,264      (1.2%)
Technician          374,598     (50.3%)
Technician Plus             0      (0.0%)
General              173,552     (23.3%)
Advanced             42,848       (5.8%)
Extra                  144,658     (19.4%)

Total                  744,920


Percentages may not add up to exactly 100.0% due to rounding.

No new Novice or Advanced licenses have been issued since April 2000. However, the totals for those classes may sometimes show an increase over prior numbers due to renewals in the grace period.

This is a new all-time high record.


73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
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Posts: 4441




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« Reply #601 on: September 28, 2017, 07:30:45 AM »

From http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on September 27, 2017 was:

Novice:                  9,262      (1.2%)
Technician          374,679     (50.3%)
Technician Plus             0      (0.0%)
General              173,574     (23.3%)
Advanced             42,854       (5.8%)
Extra                  144,670     (19.4%)

Total                  745,039

First time over 745,000


Percentages may not add up to exactly 100.0% due to rounding.

No new Novice or Advanced licenses have been issued since April 2000. However, the totals for those classes may sometimes show an increase over prior numbers due to renewals in the grace period.

This is a new all-time high record.


73 de Jim, N2EY

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N2EY
Member

Posts: 4441




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« Reply #602 on: September 29, 2017, 06:40:18 AM »

From http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on September 28, 2017 was:

Novice:                  9,263      (1.2%)
Technician          374,722     (50.3%)
Technician Plus             0      (0.0%)
General              173,574     (23.3%)
Advanced             42,846       (5.8%)
Extra                  144,664     (19.4%)

Total                  745,069


Percentages may not add up to exactly 100.0% due to rounding.

No new Novice or Advanced licenses have been issued since April 2000. However, the totals for those classes may sometimes show an increase over prior numbers due to renewals in the grace period.

This is a new all-time high record.


73 de Jim, N2EY


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N9KX
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Posts: 2061




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« Reply #603 on: September 29, 2017, 09:56:42 AM »

Quote from: PLANKEYE
Ok I think I get it now.  I think if we would do away with testing those numbers would really go up.  If it's just a numbers game I guess that would be good.  Right or wrong?

Quote from: N9KX
the idea that we should embrace quantity without regard for quality is wrong -- but you already knew that; enough with the feigned ignorance Wink

Quote from: N2EY
1) How do we define "quality" in this context?

Quote from: N9KX
that is an open question.  for me it would include licensed ham operators who have respect for the history of radio, radio operation, and science as well as international respect and a lack of jingoism or partisanship

Quote from: N2EY
2) How do we get more quality?

3) License tests aren't going away any time soon - or even long term. They're required by treaty. Plus FCC has almost 60 years' experience with what happens without licensing.

4) A big part of the reason some new (and not-so-new) hams seem so "dumb" is because there's so much more to know today.

Quote from: N9KX
certainly as the circumference of our light beam of knowledge about this mysterious universe that we are part of grows, so too does how much we realize we dont know.  but that is just the nature of knowledge.  but i would not have framed this around some idea that new hams are dumb.  i just think society in general is less courteous.  if ham radio is to continue to promote goodwill among amateur operators both within and between nations -- then i think we need to ask what would improve the tenor of on air ham radio discourse?  and i suppose one good answer can be taken from Ghandi -- be the change we wish to see in the world. ...

Jim, i would be interested in your own response to the questions you've asked above...

anyone have an opinion here or were these merely rhetorical questions? 
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SWMAN
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Posts: 1068




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« Reply #604 on: September 29, 2017, 10:38:30 AM »

 Jim, Keep up the good work and keep the count going, I like to watch them. Thanks, Jim W5JJG
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N2EY
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Posts: 4441




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« Reply #605 on: September 30, 2017, 07:05:24 AM »

From http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on September 29, 2017 was:

Novice:                  9,257      (1.2%)
Technician          374,797     (50.3%)
Technician Plus             0      (0.0%)
General              173,583     (23.3%)
Advanced             42,837       (5.7%)
Extra                  144,668     (19.4%)

Total                  745,142


Percentages may not add up to exactly 100.0% due to rounding.

No new Novice or Advanced licenses have been issued since April 2000. However, the totals for those classes may sometimes show an increase over prior numbers due to renewals in the grace period.

This is a new all-time high record.


73 de Jim, N2EY
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W3HF
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« Reply #606 on: September 30, 2017, 07:48:06 PM »

anyone have an opinion here or were these merely rhetorical questions? 

I'll take a shot...

"What is quality?" I like your definition. I'd add a desire to learn (as opposed to thinking you already know it all), a desire to help others, and a desire to "give back" to the hobby in some way.

"How do we get more quality?" Part of it is education, part is effective recruiting, part is elmering, but the best strategy is each of us being that kind of quality ham ourself.
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K3NRX
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Posts: 2867


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« Reply #607 on: October 02, 2017, 04:56:06 AM »

From http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on September 29, 2017 was:

Novice:                  9,257      (1.2%)
Technician          374,797     (50.3%)
Technician Plus             0      (0.0%)
General              173,583     (23.3%)
Advanced             42,837       (5.7%)
Extra                  144,668     (19.4%)

Total                  745,142


Percentages may not add up to exactly 100.0% due to rounding.

No new Novice or Advanced licenses have been issued since April 2000. However, the totals for those classes may sometimes show an increase over prior numbers due to renewals in the grace period.

This is a new all-time high record.


73 de Jim, N2EY


A new all time high record, eh?.....I must say Mr. Bond....you certainly are very spry for a dead (or dying) hobby!..... Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Roll Eyes......I am curious though as to the number of Tech licenses as opposed to the higher classes......does anyone have an explanation as to why Tech has the most holders?......lousy HF conditions perhaps?.....lack of motivation?.......ya know, I thought that dropping the code requirement was supposed to increase those numbers.......

V
K3NRX

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W3HF
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« Reply #608 on: October 02, 2017, 06:13:10 AM »

...I am curious though as to the number of Tech licenses as opposed to the higher classes......does anyone have an explanation as to why Tech has the most holders?......lousy HF conditions perhaps?.....lack of motivation?.......ya know, I thought that dropping the code requirement was supposed to increase those numbers.......

It's interesting watching these numbers change over time. Another good source of data is AH0A's web page. Joe has been collecting month-end license data for over twenty years now. Comparing the current data to that from March 2000 (just before License Restructuring went into effect):

- Total license count is up about 10%, but the distribution has changed.
- Numbers of Advanced and Novices dropped, as no new licenses of those classes have been issued since April 2000. Advanced dropped from 15.2% to 5.7%; Novices from 7.5% to 1.2%.
- Numbers of Extras and Generals increased as did their fraction of the total population. Extras went from 11.2% to 19.4%; Generals went from 16.2% to 23.3%.
- Interestingly, though the number of Tech licenses went up, the fraction of population stayed about the same: 49.9% to 50.3%.
- Net effect of the above is that the fraction of hams with higher-level licenses (i.e., General or higher) went up from 42.6% to 48.5%. I think this is the bump you were expecting for the drop in code requirements.

There are likely many reasons for the percentage of Tech licenses staying the same, and all we can do is speculate. My speculations fall along the following lines:

- This is the entry-level license. Almost all newbies will start here.
- Some fraction of these will never do much, and will either drop out without renewing, or will renew and never get active. So there's an inactive base number that won't change much.
- Some of these are EmComm folks whose only interest is local VHF/UHF. These have no need to upgrade.
- Some of these are in the "I'll get to it sooner or later" category, and there are a significant number of upgrades happening. Since the license structure has been stable for a while, this is likely also a relatively static percentage.
- Many licensees are in a "I'm satisfied with the privileges I have" category, which is fine. Some may really truly be satisfied with amateur radio as they use it. But I think some of these are also in a "don't know what they're missing" category. They're the ones who don't pay attention to sunspots or propagation conditions, which HF contest is this weekend, and when the next DXpedition to KH3 is going to happen because they don't know how much fun some of those activities can be.

Turning all those speculations into hard numbers is really hard, and I'm not sure what we'd do with them. I think the best approach is continued education and exposure. That means presentations and demonstrations at club meetings, publications (both print and Internet), and personal contacts.
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N9KX
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« Reply #609 on: October 02, 2017, 03:05:43 PM »


It's interesting watching these numbers change over time. Another good source of data is AH0A's web page. Joe has been collecting month-end license data for over twenty years now. Comparing the current data to that from March 2000 (just before License Restructuring went into effect):

- Total license count is up about 10%, but the distribution has changed.
- Numbers of Advanced and Novices dropped, as no new licenses of those classes have been issued since April 2000. Advanced dropped from 15.2% to 5.7%; Novices from 7.5% to 1.2%.
- Numbers of Extras and Generals increased as did their fraction of the total population. Extras went from 11.2% to 19.4%; Generals went from 16.2% to 23.3%.
- Interestingly, though the number of Tech licenses went up, the fraction of population stayed about the same: 49.9% to 50.3%.
- Net effect of the above is that the fraction of hams with higher-level licenses (i.e., General or higher) went up from 42.6% to 48.5%. I think this is the bump you were expecting for the drop in code requirements.

There are likely many reasons for the percentage of Tech licenses staying the same, and all we can do is speculate. My speculations fall along the following lines:

- This is the entry-level license. Almost all newbies will start here.
- Some fraction of these will never do much, and will either drop out without renewing, or will renew and never get active. So there's an inactive base number that won't change much.
- Some of these are EmComm folks whose only interest is local VHF/UHF. These have no need to upgrade.
- Some of these are in the "I'll get to it sooner or later" category, and there are a significant number of upgrades happening. Since the license structure has been stable for a while, this is likely also a relatively static percentage.
- Many licensees are in a "I'm satisfied with the privileges I have" category, which is fine. Some may really truly be satisfied with amateur radio as they use it. But I think some of these are also in a "don't know what they're missing" category. They're the ones who don't pay attention to sunspots or propagation conditions, which HF contest is this weekend, and when the next DXpedition to KH3 is going to happen because they don't know how much fun some of those activities can be.

Turning all those speculations into hard numbers is really hard, and I'm not sure what we'd do with them. I think the best approach is continued education and exposure. That means presentations and demonstrations at club meetings, publications (both print and Internet), and personal contacts.


so, if i am reading you and the numbers correctly -- Generals and Extras tend to maintain their licenses for longer periods of time than Technicians (which also makes intuitive sense).
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W3HF
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« Reply #610 on: October 02, 2017, 04:21:52 PM »

so, if i am reading you and the numbers correctly -- Generals and Extras tend to maintain their licenses for longer periods of time than Technicians (which also makes intuitive sense).

Well I didn't actually say that, and I'm not sure if you can really infer that level of detail. There's nothing in this data that actually says that any of the licensees in 2017 were licensed in 2000, though I know that's a fact--I'm proof of it. In fact, what the data DOES say is that there are over 52,000 hams who hold EXACTLY the same license class they held 17 years ago, as everyone who is now either a Novice or Advanced must have held that same license class when the doors closed.

But I think it's a truism that hams who bothered to upgrade have more invested in the hobby. Furthermore, it's logical that those who have more invested are less likely to drop out, but this data doesn't prove that premise. To really figure that out, one would have to find data that shows the rate at which the different license classes expire and are not renewed, and somehow make a distinction between "expire due to death" and "expire for other reasons" (such as lack of interest). I'm sure someone could mine the ULS to determine expiration rates by license class, but there's no data available on reasons for expiration.
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N9AOP
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« Reply #611 on: October 03, 2017, 08:49:25 AM »

In this county the number of new hams has doubled due to ham-in-a-day classes but to what end?  They don't get on the air and use their licenses so that the actual number of active hams has decreased due to those that vapor locked.
Art
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KS2G
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Posts: 732




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« Reply #612 on: October 03, 2017, 07:21:14 PM »

... the actual number of active hams has decreased...

And you base that statement on?Huh

First -- what's the definition of "active"?
You appear to mean that they're on-the-air.
But there are many hams that are not on-the-air for a variety of reasons, but are "active" in off-air activities with clubs, license classes, VE teams, etc.

Besides, there's never been a way to determine how many licensees are on-the-air.

The best GUESS has long been that about half of licensees are "active" in some way or another ... and that's still the case.

You are correct, however, that a large proportion of new licensees never get on the air.

Bottom line: the proportion of licensees who are "active" is probably what it's always been -- about half, which means that that number  --like the number of licensees-- is at an all time high.
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N2EY
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Posts: 4441




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« Reply #613 on: October 05, 2017, 07:02:47 AM »

From http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on October 4, 2017 was:

Novice:                  9,249      (1.2%)
Technician          374,838     (50.3%)
Technician Plus             0      (0.0%)
General              173,617     (23.3%)
Advanced             42,812       (5.7%)
Extra                  144,700     (19.4%)

Total                  745,216


Percentages may not add up to exactly 100.0% due to rounding.

No new Novice or Advanced licenses have been issued since April 2000. However, the totals for those classes may sometimes show an increase over prior numbers due to renewals in the grace period.

This is a new all-time high record.


73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 4441




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« Reply #614 on: October 13, 2017, 07:46:31 AM »

From http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on October 12, 2017 was:

Novice:                  9,240      (1.2%)
Technician          375,127    (50.3%)
Technician Plus             0      (0.0%)
General              173,604     (23.3%)
Advanced             42,726       (5.7%)
Extra                  144,689     (19.4%)

Total                  745,386


Percentages may not add up to exactly 100.0% due to rounding.

No new Novice or Advanced licenses have been issued since April 2000. However, the totals for those classes may sometimes show an increase over prior numbers due to renewals in the grace period.

This is a new all-time high record.


73 de Jim, N2EY
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