Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 1 to 8 was yesterday's QSO ratio  (Read 1749 times)
KF6VCI
Member

Posts: 79




Ignore
« on: September 23, 2010, 05:48:15 AM »

All HF bands seemed dead despite a S9 noise floor. None of my CQ calls was answered. Then Finn, OZ1HET took over sending some quick CQ calls.

Unexpectedly, a mini pileup ensued and a few minutes later, he had made 8 QSos with Japanese stations. Of those, only Kiyoshi-san JR3TOE was sticking around to answer my CQ. TNX, Old Man!

One never knows when someone makes QSY or is hanging around. But to me, it felt like most ops would not want to deal with a bad beginner.

To avoid the dreaded counting at too slow speeds, I was sending with extended pauses (Farnsworth). As even at character speed 35 (effective speed 4 wpm or 8 wpm) my brain sometimes plays back a character at a slower speed, allowing me once again "to count". H or 5?

Back to the software and practice at home. Am closing my eyes and practice writing without looking.

Once I'm on the air, it's like a receiver getting overloaded and I kind of stop copying. It's emberrassing. I bet others have been asking themselves "what's wrong with me". too.

When you hear a beginner struggling and screwing up even his own call, why not help him along?
73s de Chris HS/KF6VCI

Logged
N3QE
Member

Posts: 2422




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2010, 06:07:09 AM »

Once I'm on the air, it's like a receiver getting overloaded and I kind of stop copying. It's emberrassing. I bet others have been asking themselves "what's wrong with me". too.
There's a "beginner's nervousness" that will go away. I encourage you to spend a lot of time listening... jump in when you get a chance.
Quote
When you hear a beginner struggling and screwing up even his own call, why not help him along?
There are Old Farts who have been doing this for most of a century, have a vibroplex, and can't even send there own call.

I will be far more likely to help a beginner than the OF's who can't send their own call. If the beginner is trying to send faster than he can reliably... I'm less likely to step up and help.

Tim.
Logged
KF6VCI
Member

Posts: 79




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2010, 09:50:05 PM »

TNX, Tim: what you say makes perfect sense!
Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3925




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2010, 03:59:03 PM »

There is a 20 dB gain built into a rare callsign.

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
AB2T
Member

Posts: 246




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2010, 08:52:18 PM »

This is how I practice code skills off the air:

I listen to W1AW every night either on the radio or over the internet.  Relax, lie down, listen to all the code (even if it's fast).  Don't copy a word down! Don't try to think about what's happening.  Your code skill will climb gradually, and contextual abilities will improve as well.  In other words, you will anticipate very common English words by their most common sentence positions.  From that point you'll develop the ability to complete words and even phrases mentally before they are fully sent.

For sending, I follow the advice given in one of the forums: download one of the archived W1AW text files from www.arrl.org and send along to one of the mp3 transmission recordings!  It works!  Great way to keep the fist strong.  I know some hams might cringe at an operator's attempt to mimic a computer.  I think it's a fine exercise.   

73, Jordan
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!